Ancestors of Tim Farr and The Descendants of Stephen Farr


Thomas PARDOE III [scrapbook] was born 1 on 15 Nov 1864 in Stratford upon Avon, Warwickshire, England, United Kingdom. He was christened on 7 Jun 1865 in Saint James, Stratford Upon Avon, Warwickshire, England, United Kingdom. He died 2 on 11 Oct 1935 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. He was buried 3 on 13 Oct 1935 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. Thomas married 4 Lenora FARR on 10 Dec 1883 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States.

Lenora FARR [Parents] [scrapbook] was born 1, 2 on 22 Mar 1867 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. She died 3 on 25 Jul 1954 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. She was buried 4 on 28 Jul 1954 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. Lenora married 5 Thomas PARDOE III on 10 Dec 1883 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States.

Lenora was counted in a census 6 in 1870 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States.

CENSUS: Age 3.


David BALLANTYNE [Parents] [scrapbook] was christened 1 on 7 Aug 1748 in Earlston, Berwickshire, Scotland, United Kingdom. He died on 12 Dec 1831 in Springhall, Kelso, Roxburghshire, Scotland, United Kingdom. He was buried in Ednam Churchyard, Kelso, Scotland, United Kingdom. David married 2 Ann BANNERMAN on 28 Oct 1808 in Earlston, Berwickshire, Scotland, United Kingdom.

David was a member of Member of the Relief Church in Kelso, Roxburgshire, Scotland, United Kingdom.

Other marriages:
WALLACE, Cecelia

Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, p.733
BALLANTYNE, RICHARD (son of David Ballantyne, born 1748 near Roxburgh, Scotland, and died Dec. 12, 1831, and Ann Bannerman, born 1789 at Dundee, Scotland

Ann BANNERMAN [Parents] [scrapbook] was born in Oct 1790/1791 in Kildonan, Sutherland, Scotland, United Kingdom. She died on 11 Oct 1871 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States. She was buried in Oct 1871. Ann married 1 David BALLANTYNE on 28 Oct 1808 in Earlston, Berwickshire, Scotland, United Kingdom.

Ann was counted in a census 2 in 1860 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States.

Dates for ordinance work were taken from family group sheet in Tim Farr's possession.
Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, p.733
BALLANTYNE, RICHARD (son of David Ballantyne, born 1748 near Roxburgh, Scotland, and died Dec. 12, 1831, and Ann Bannerman, born 1789 at Dundee, Scotland


A SKETCH OF THE LIFE OF
Ann Bannerman Ballantyne

BY DELECTA BALLANTYNE BURTON

FOREWORD
Beyond the achievements of every successful man or woman lies a motivating force that has moulded the life of the individual and is a reflection of his early training, a mirror as it were in which we see his home environment from childhood through the years, his training and teaching by precept and example of father and mother.

As with Lincoln so was it with Richard Ballantyne, whose father died when he was six years of age, also his sister, Jane. I knew and revered them both. Jane married the future President John Taylor. Her very presence breathed refinement and culture. To me she seemed a veritable queen with her dainty white lace cap and apron over her flowing dark gown. Richard likewise was gentile and manly, quiet, always so neat and clean, kind and friendly, and deeply religious.

When a little child I loved Richard, and to the close of his life I adored and admired his virtues. That his mother, Ann, was the motivating force in his life is shown in his diary. She was his confidant and advisor. She, it was, while in Nauvoo, who told him of a dream that foretold him of his early meeting with Huldah Meriah and their marriage. Ann seemed to have vision and f oresight. She was prayerful, full of faith in God, and fearless in doing what she felt was right; a true pioneer well prepared to meet the vicissitudes of life.

Thus I have written the life s story of Ann as I see it reflected in the lives of her children, and from her son, Richard's, diary. May it help us to appreciate our ancestry and live worthy of the great heritage they have left us.


STORY OF ANN BANNERMAN BALLANTYNE

Ann, or Annie Bannerman, was born of good sturdy parents, Peter Bannerman and Ann or Annie Mattheson, both of whom were born in Kildonan, Sutherlandshire, Scotland. She was born in October, 1789, the fifth of eleven children (all of whom were also born there).

Iseby                    Abt. 1780 in Kildonan, Sutherland, Scotland
Christiana             Abt. 1782
Catherine             Abt. 1785
Grace                  Abt. 1787
Annie or Ann       Oct. 1789                 Died Oct. 12, 1871
Isabella               Abt. 1790
Wilhelmena        Sept. 6, 1791
Donald               Abt. 1794                    Died under 8 years
William               Abt. 1796                Died age 6 years
Isabel                May 14, 1799                   Died under 8 years
Mina                  Nov. 17, 1805


Peter Bannierman's birthdate is not definitely known but Anne Mattheson's birth is given as the year 1752. Her son Richard's diary gives the information that her parents were of Swedish descent but no mention is made of their parentage.

Bannerman is not a common name but one given as a special award by his king to the standard or banner bearer who has for unusual valor been instrumental in winning the king s battle. This title has been awarded to a banner bearer in two different clans in Scotland and it is a much coveted and highly prized honor to this banner bearer and upon his descendants who inherit the name.

Since Ann Bannerman, who was my great grandmother, passed away some five years prior to my birth, I have no personal recollections to record, and her nearer kinsmen who did know her, have little to pass on to me. However, to her son, Richard, who kept his diary for many years, we are greatly indebted. From this I shall quote, it being my greatest source of information. Ann told practically nothing of her early life which is not unusual as reticence is a strong characteristic of a Bannerman.

During Ann's early motherhood which is usually the story telling time for mothers, her days were filled to the brim with the problem of filling hungry mouths and clothing the little bodies of her wee lads and lassies. Night time found her weary body ready for rest with little energy to even recount her own happy childhood when she tended the cows and sheep as they grazed on the lovely green hills and fields of Kildonan. It was probably her task also to churn the rich cream into chunks of golden butter and help with work around the home. In those days children early learned the value of work and were skilled in the various trades of these sturdy people.

It is a Scotch tradition that no young woman is considered eligible for marriage until she with her own hands has spun the flax for an ample supply of bed and table linen for her home. She was also skilled in the art of converting wool from their sheep into beautiful plaids for blankets, dresses, and kilts for the family and in leisure hours her nimble fingers turned yarn into warm stockings, mittens, and scarfs for members of the household. In those days sewing machines were unknown, so all sewing of clothing for the family was done with just the needle and thread.

Researchers have long been puzzled over the dearth of early parish records from the north of Scotland. This seemed strange to us until a few years ago we decided to try to contact Bannermans from that section for family history. An advertisement was inserted in a leading Scotish newspaper. Replying to this, a Bannerman descendent sent us a book entitled "Memorabilia Domistica t or Parish life in the North of Scotland, written by Donald Sage, a minister.

This book gives the Sutherland Clearance of 1800-1809 and the complete clearance in 1819. He pictures the life of the people there from 1725-1869, by giving the memoirs of his grandfather, his father, and himself. All three men were ministers. He tells of the ejection of the people of Sutherlandshire from their farms which had "from time immemorial, been in possession of their mountain tenements." Quoting, "This sweeping desolation extended over many parishes but it fell most heavily on the parish of Kildonan, where it had its beginning. The whole north and south sides of the Strath, from Kildonan to Caenon the left bank of the river, and from Dalcharn to Marcel on the right bank, were at one full sweep, cleared of their inhabitants. The measures for their ejection had been taken with such promptness, and so suddenly, and brutally carried out as to excite a tumult among the people."

In 1819 the lordly proprietors of Sutherland climaxed their system of oppression by the Clearance of 1819 which proved to be the extinction of the Highland Peasantry in the north. One day, at a weeks notice, the people were cast out of their "tenements and told to go -- many knew not whether." Quoting, "The middle of the week brought on the Strathaven Clearance (1819). It was on a Tuesday. At an early hour of that day, Mr. Seller, accompanied by the Fiscal, (William Young) and escorted by a strong body of constables, sheriffs-officers and others, commenced work. Their plan of operations was to clear the cottages of their inmates, giving them about half an hour to pack up and carry off their furniture, and then set fire to the cottages and churches alike, To this plan they ruthlessly adhered, without the slightest regard to any obstacle that might arise while carrying it into execution."

It appears to us that in this clearance Ann may have been separated from her family. We learn from Richard's diary that Ann's mother died in upper Canada which makes it appear that her parents went there with others in the Lord Selkirk Company.

We do know that Ann Bannerman came from the north of Scotland as she spoke the Gaelic language when she came to Edinburgh which is so different from that spoken in the south that she had difficulty making herself understood. She must, however have resided there for a time and learned the Southern dialect before meeting David Ballantyne, a widower, whom she married the 28th of October 1808. She was 19 and he 60 years of age, but it proved to be a most happy and congenial union from which were born seven children:

Ann, born August 7, 1809, died February 20, 1819.
Peter, born June 15, 1811 in Shielfield, Co. Beruch, Scotland, died Sept. 18, 1893.
Jane, born April 11, 1813, in Shielfield, Co. Beruch, Scotland, died Dec. 1904.
Robert, born Dec. 9, 1815, in Whitridge Bog. Beruch, Scotland, died in infancy-1819.
Richard, born August 26, 1817, in Whitridge Bog. Beruch, Scotland, died Nov. 8, 1898.
Ann, born September 2, 1819, in Whitridge Bog. Beruch, Scotland, died March 16, 1908,
James, born August, 1822 in Millerstain, Scotland, died March, 1833.

David was a large handsome man six feet tall and weighing over two hundred pounds. He was a good devout and faithful follower of Christ and a lover of His divine truth and mission. His first wife, Cecelia Wallace had died and left him with the following children, William, Margaret, Henry, and Cecelia. Quoting from her son Richard's diary, "By profession my father was a farmer and owned a homestead of 80 or 100 acres of land. The name of the place was Shielfield, about two miles from Earlston, a village in the south of Scotland, which then contained about eleven hundred inhabitants, In addition to the property named he owned in the town of Galashiels five two-story rock houses which he rented, and from which, and the farm, he derived a comfortable support for himself and family." "When about seventy years of age he was stripped of all his property and reduced, with his family, to actual want. The accumulation of years of patient and persevering industry were wrested from him in a moment. The hope of being able to live in ease and comfort during the decline of life with his devoted and beloved wife and family was blasted in an instant. Through being security for other parties, and to pay their debts, his entire property was seized, sold at public auction and himself and family turned out of doors with only a cow and a few articles of household furniture. In this distressing situation he hired a small cot on a neighboring farrm from the proprietor of which he received employment at common labor. "But as age increased upon him, he became unable to do much of that and the support of the family gradually came to devolve upon my mother who was 19 years the youngest. From this responsibility she never flinched. Her devotion to him and the family knew no bounds. For years she toiled unaided, never seeking for, but ever refusing public charity. She would rather have worked herself into the grave than to have lost her native independence of character. By and by, however, the children gradually grew up and could help share the responsibility; but even their aid did not much lighten her burdens until most of them were able to do for themselves, and also to help her. It was a characteristic of the family to help each other. No one called that which he earned his own. All went to Mother to be used as she thought best, and never was any dissatisfaction manifested in regard to her management or distribution of their little earnings. At ten or eleven years of age until I was fourteen, I worked hard, ten hours a day at farm labor, for ten cents a day. And my elder brothers and sisters wages were correspondingly low. From this it may be seen, that though Mother never relaxed her own efforts, the strictest economy was required to maintain a respectable appearance. The accomplishment of this aim with proper moral and religious training was the acme of her ambition, but even in this she might have failed had not some wealthy neighbors, who had learned the sad misfortunes of the family, come occasionally to their relief. But with this generous private aid, though in all really amounting to but little, made up in the kind of aid furnished a lack that otherwise would have been keenly felt, but with this she was able to clothe, as she thought, her children like little princes, at least on the Sabbath day, and was saved that deep mortification, which otherwise would have been felt, in looking at the condition of the objects of her most devoted affection. To be able to accomplish this was a balm and solace to her heart which filled her with a cheerful and happy contentment. In stature she was small, but in ambition and every domestic and Christian virtue she was truly great.

Before closing this brief but dutiful sketch of her valued life a more graphic picture may be presented to the mind by relating the incidents and labors of a single day as illustrative of many another day of her busy life, It being time of harvest, when wages were high, she availed herself of the opportunity for several years of working about a month in the harvest field in order to pay the annual rent of the home. During the time she arose between three and four o clock, milked two cows, prepared breakfast, and cleaned the house, travelled two miles to begin work at six, there used the reaping hook till eleven, took dinner and rested till one, then worked again five hours till six, then she went home, ate supper and milked the cows, went with the milk a mile and a half, distributed it to customers. Returning home faint and weary she retired to rest to again resume the performance of the same duties each succeeding day till the harvest should end, without a murmur ever falling from her lips.

In thinking over the sturdy accomplishments above referred to, I do so with gratitude to God, my Heavenly Father, believing that such a course of events was necessary to prepare our minds for the reception of the gospel. Had we been raised on the lap of ease and comfort, where pride is apt to be engendered, we might not have been sufficiently humble to receive the gospel with Joy and gladness. Therefore I relate these things with thanksgiving that God in his infinite mercy did thus prepare our minds to receive this glorious truth.

Both Father and Mother had a sacred regard for the Sabbath and its religious duties. After Father's death she kept up the same order of religious worship and duty in the home. And on the Sabbath the same punctual observances at Church and Sabbath School, She received the gospel with myself and my sisters, Jane and Annie, and was baptized December, 1842. Next year she emigrated with all her living children to Nauvoo, arriving there on the 11th of November, 1843, then the place appointed of God for the fathering of His saints. She received all the ordinances of the Church in her faith, and every tenet of its doctrines, had the happy though toilsome privilege of gathering with the saints to the Rocky Mountains, arrived in Salt Lake City, probably September, 1848, then spent the remainder of her life in Salt Lake City at the home of her daughter, Jane Ballantyne Taylor. She passed away October 12, 1871 and was buried near her daughter in the lot of President John Taylor in the Salt Lake City Cemetery.

This sketch would hardly be complete without adding the tribute Richard pays to his father whose religious habits were of such great value to his children. He died before hearing the gospel but his example was worthy of being imitated by his family. Morning and evening he called his family together for worship. A Hymn was sung, a chapter of the bible was read, and a prayer most sincerely and devoutly offered up to God. Each one of the family was taught to attend to sacred prayer as well. He was likewise attentive to public worship and the duty it imposed. He was a member of the Relief Church, a body of worshippers who had dissented from the National Presbyterian Church. He always took the family to Sunday School and Church with him as long as he was able to do so. I cannot remember an instance when I was not taken or sent to both meetings. It never seems to have occurred to my mind that I had a right to stay away from either. Having had these advantages of pious parental care, the habit of attending meetings and Sabbath School became in later years more of a pleasure than a duty. In fact, in maturer years I have felt that attention to these things has been indispensable to my happiness, A habit had been formed and desires and tastes gradually created which could only have their fullest gratification in these pleasing and profitable associations.


Written by Delecta Ballantyne Burton

CENSUS: Age 70. Born in Scotland.

Marriage Notes:

MARRIAGE: I find a marriage record of a David Balantine to Anne McDonal on the 22 Oct 1808 in Maxton. This must be where the date on the IGI came from. Ann was taken in by another family when her parents left Scotland. This could be the correct marriage record.

They had the following children.

  F i
Ann BALLANTYNE was born on 7 Aug 1809 in Sheatfield, Berwickshire, Scotland, United Kingdom. She died on 10 Feb 1819. She was buried in Feb 1819.
  M ii
Peter BALLANTYNE was born on 14 Jun 1811 in Sheatfield, Berwickshire, Scotland, United Kingdom. He died 1 on 12 Sep 1893. He was buried in Sep 1893.
  F iii Jane BALLANTYNE was born on 11 Apr 1813. She died on 26 Dec 1900.
  M iv
Robert BALLANTYNE was born on 9 Dec 1815 in Merton, Berwickshire, Scotland, United Kingdom. He died on 20 Mar 1819. He was buried in Mar 1819.
  M v Richard BALLANTYNE was born on 26 Aug 1817. He died on 8 Nov 1898.
  F vi Annie BALLANTYNE was born on 2 Sep 1819. She died on 10 Mar 1908.
  M vii
James BALLANTYNE was born on 15 Aug 1821 in Kelso, Roxburgshire, Scotland, United Kingdom. He was christened 1, 2 on 8 Oct 1822 in Kelso, Roxburgshire, Scotland, United Kingdom. He died on 2 Nov 1833. He was buried in Nov 1833.

Richard BALLANTYNE [Parents] [scrapbook] was born 1 on 26 Aug 1817 in Whiterigg Bog, Roxburghshire, Scotland, United Kingdom. He died 2 on 8 Nov 1898 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. He was buried on 13 Nov 1898. Richard married 3, 4 Huldah Maria CLARK on 18 Feb 1847 in Winter Quarters, Douglas, Nebraska, United States.

Other marriages:
PEARCE, Mary
SANDERSON, Caroline Albertine

Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, p.733
BALLANTYNE, RICHARD (son of David Ballantyne, born 1748 near Roxburgh, Scotland, and died Dec. 12, 1831, and Ann Bannerman, born 1789 at Dundee, Scotland; married Oct. 28, 1808). Born Aug. 26, 1817, at Earlston, Berwick, Scotland. Came to Utah Sept. 20, 1848, Brigham Young company.
Married Huldah Meriah Clark Feb. 18, 1847 (daughter of Gardner Clark and Delecta Farrer who were married 1813 at Geneseo, N. Y.; the former died 1847 at Winter Quarters, Iowa, and the latter came to Utah 1848). She was born Oct. 26, 1823, and came to Utah with husband. Their children: Richard Alando b. June 1, 1848, m. Mary Ann Stewart Dec. 27, 1875; Delecta Annie Jane b. Nov. 22, 1849, m. Louis F. Moench Feb. 15, 1874; David Henry b. Nov. 16, 1851, d. Aug. 31, 1863; Meriah Cedenia b. June 25, 1856, m. Austin C. Brown Feb. 2, 1874; John Taylor b. Dec. 28, 1857, m. Mahala E. Wilson March 18, 1885; Annie b. July 15, 1860, m. Louis F. Moench; Roseltha b. March 10, 1862, m. Jesse G. Stratford Nov. 23, 1882; Isabella b. Aug. 3, 1864, m. Louis Alvin West Nov. 23, 1882; Joseph b. Feb. 20, 1868, m. Rosannah A. Brown. Family homes Salt Lake City, Nephi, Ogden and Eden, Utah.
Married Mary Pearce Nov. 27, 1855, Salt Lake City, Utah (daughter of Edward Pearce and Elizabeth Bennett), who was born Oct. 1, 1828, at Ratcliffe, London, Eng., and came to Utah Sept. 25, 1855, with her husband's company. Their children: Zachariah b. Oct. 31, 1856, m. Martha Ferrin; Mary Elizabeth b. Sept. 7, 1858, m. Willard Farr; Jane Susannah b. Feb. 10, 1861, m. Edward H. Anderson; James Edward b. Nov. 1, 1863, m. Sarah H. Critchlow; Eliza Jane b. June 8, 1866, m. Henry J. Garner; Heber Charles b. Feb. 28, 1867, m. Ada Belnap. Family resided at Salt Lake City, Nephi and Ogden, Utah.
Married Caroline Albertine Sanderson Nov. 7, 1856, at Salt Lake City (daughter of Kanute Alexanderson and Ingebor Christina Larsen), who was born Sept. 19, 1837, at Roken, Norway. Their children: Thomas Henry b. Dec. 12, 1858, m. Martha Carstensen Sept. 6, 1883; Caroline Josephine b. Jan. 30. 1861, m.Marcus Farr; Matilda b. Dec. 30, 1862, d. Sept. 4, 1882; Catherine Mena b. Dec. 29, 1864, d. Nov. 18, 1866; Jedediah b. Nov. 18, 1867, m. Nettie Wilson; Brigham b. Feb. 18, 1871; Laura Elizabeth b. June 23, 1874. Family resided at Salt Lake City, Nephi, Ogden and Eden.
Missionary to Hindoostan, India, 1852, laboring in Calcutta and Madras, and publishing a paper there. Brought a company of immigrants to Utah Sept. 25, 1855. Pioneer to the Salmon river 1857 and returning moved to Nephi, 1857, and to Ogden 1860; located the town of Eden 1866, and there served as bishop until 1871. High councilor 37 years and superintendent Sunday schools of Weber stake. Organized the first Sunday school in the dominant church December, 1849, and therefore is known as "father of the Sunday schools." County commissioner of Weber county 12 years; alderman of Ogden several terms; school trustee. Publisher and editor of "Ogden Junction" 1877. Merchant and farmer.

LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, Andrew Jenson, Vol. 1, p.703 Ballantyne, Richard, founder of the great Sunday School system of the Latter-day Saints, was born in Whitridgebog, Roxburgshire, Scotland, Aug. 26, 1817, son of David Ballantyne and Ann Bannerman. Both his parents were born in Scotland, his father in Merton or Earlston, in 1743, and his mother, in the Highlands, in 1784. His father was first married to Cecelia Wallace, who died leaving three children, William, Henry and Margaret, all of whom died in Scotland. When sixty years of age he married his second wife who was then nineteen years of age. Her children's names and the dates of their birth are as follows: Ann, born Aug. 7, 1809; died Feb. 10, 1819. Peter, born June 15, 1811; died in Ogden, Sept. 12, 1893. Jane, born April 11, 1813, died in Salt Lake City Dec. 26, 1900. Robert, born Dec. 9, 1815; died in infancy. Richard, born Aug. 26, 1817; died in Ogden, Nov. 8, 1898. Annie, born Sept. 2. 1819. James, born August, 1821; died in 1833; buried in Earlston cemetery. Richard's father, David Ballantyne, a large, handsome man, six feet tall and weighing over 200 pounds, died in 1829, in Springhall, near Kelso, Roxburgshire, Scotland, and was buried in Ednam churchyard, without hearing the gospel; but he was a good, devout and faithful follower of Christ, and a lover of his divine truth and mission. His mother and all her family joined the Church, becoming devout believers in the doctrines of Christ as restored through the Prophet Joseph Smith. After gathering to Nauvoo, Ill., with her family in 1843, she continued a faithful member of the Church, cheerfully bearing all the severe trials and privations of the expulsion the travels in the wilderness, and the settling of a new country in the Salt Lake valley, finally passing away from the troubles of this life in peace, in October, 1871. She was buried in the Salt Lake City cemetery, in the lot of President John Taylor, who had married her daughters Jane and Annie. Richard Ballantyne, who was early taught to be moral and religious, was baptized by sprinkling when an infant, into the "Relief Presbyterian Church," being later taught in its doctrines. When twenty-one years of age he became an elder, and later a ruling elder whose duties consisted cf visiting among the members with the priest, and looking after the finances of the church, in which he was greatly blessed. It was while still a young man that he began his labors as a Sunday school teacher, which work he [p.704] continued to his dying day. After due investigation, he was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by Elder Henry McCune, president of the branch in Edinburgh, in the waters of Leith, on a beautiful moonlight night, in December, 1842. "All nature seemed to be at peace," he writes; "to look at the broad expanse of waters, and to contemplate the mysteries of the unfathomed deep, might well suggest the mysteries of the unknown future that now lay before me; and what if a picture thereof had been unfolded to me! What would I have seen?" What, indeed, but persecution at home; pilgrimage to a foreign land; tempestuous seas; Nauvoo, with its sore trials and martyred Prophet and Patriarch; the pioneer journey over the deserts to the Rocky Mountains, surrounded by wild beasts and savages, in the midst of sickness, hunger and death; the new and barren home where there was supreme war with the elements and crickets for a scant livelihood; himself, moved upon by the spirit of God to build a house, without money or other help, in which to teach the children the gospel of Jesus Christ, and establish the Sunday Schools which, under the fostering hand of God's providence, were to grow in his lifetime to be a mighty aid in God's "marvelous work and a wonder;" travels over unknown seas to proclaim the gospel to the heathen, until, without purse or scrip, he should girdle the earth in his mission of love; the peculiar days of the "Reformation" in his desert home; the armies of the nation unwittingly sent to Utah with a view to accomplish what other trials and sufferings had failed to achieve; again the abandonment of home in the "Move;" the return in peace and the marvelous growth of his chosen people until the silence of the mountain valleys is broken by the voice of thrift and industry; himself standing as the husband of three wives, and father of twenty-two children, and over one hundred grandchildren, with sons-in-law, and daughters-in-law; the "raid" and legal persecution of 1882-90, with its fearful apprehensions, imprisonments and fines; the light and prosperity of the decade closing the nineteenth century, darkened to him by financial failure; the end of his days, marked by the peace of a life well spent; and the joy of beholding a united and honored family, and having a mind full of faith and hope and trust in God, which could in the end exclaim: "I know that my Redeemer lives." Having at length reviewed most of these incidents, he writes: "The foregoing, to show how wise it is in God to keep the future mostly hidden from our view!" As to the employments of his life up to this time: When seven years of age, he herded his mother's cows on the public roads: at ten he tended garden, walks, and the lawn of a wealthy gentleman, working also on the farm; from twelve to fourteen, he worked exclusively on the farm. His education was obtained during the time from nine to fourteen that he occasionally attended school, mostly in the winter months. At fourteen he was apprenticed as a baker, to a Mr. Gray, serving three years. When he was sixteen, he was made foreman of the business; he also served one year as baker's foreman in Kelso, under a Mr. Riddle. His former master, Gray, dying, he purchased his business for $25 and became his own master, for five years conducting his business in Earlston; quitting to remove to Nauvoo when he quit baking forever, for he never liked it. Leaving his native country in 1843, with his mother, two sisters and a brother, he came by way of New Orleans, to Nauvoo, Ill. Here he became the manager and bookkeeper of the Coach and Carriage Association, where many of the wagons were built which aided the first emigrants to cross the plains to Utah. In 1846, he settled the affairs of John Taylor's printing establishment, hired a flouring mill with Peter Slater, 36 miles east of Nauvoo, and he also engaged in farming on the east bank of the Missouri river. During the troubles in Nauvoo, he with others, was in the hands of the mob for over two weeks, suffering greatly from exposure and hardship. In 1846 he went with the scattered remnants of Nauvoo to Winter Quarters, where he remained about eighteen months, until May 18, 1848, at which date he started for the Valley, crossing the plains in Pres. Brigham Young's company, which arrived in Salt Lake City in September. In the year previous, he married Huldah Meriah Clark, and their first son, Richard, was born while crossing the plains. Arriving at the "Old Fort," he again went to farming, on [p.705] Mill creek. He lost his crop for three years in succession, and finally obtained five acres on Canyon creek. Here a terrific hail storm destroyed his crop. In 1846, he was ordained a Seventy by Pres. Joseph Young, and shortly thereafter a High Priest by Apostle John Taylor, which latter office in the Church he held and honored to the time of his death.
He labored with constancy in the Priesthood, considering all his duties a pleasure, but his Sabbath school labors were his chief delight. Upon arriving in the Valley, he immediately began to consider how the moral and spiritual welfare of the children might be advanced; and, having obtained a little home, he asked his Bishop for permission to establish a Sunday school. Permission was granted, but there was no prospect for obtaining a house to meet in for months to come. Under this predicament, he resolved to build an addition to his home, and there begin the work. In the summer of 1849 he hauled rock from the Cottonwood quarries and laid the foundation of red sand stone, and also made the adobes, hauled logs to the saw mill for a share of the lumber, exchanged work with a carpenter who made the doors and windows, and so the first Sunday school house was built, and the first school, numbering some fifty students, was held in it on the second Sunday in December, 1849. Later it was held in the Fourteenth Ward meeting house. I asked him at one time, why he was so desirous of organizing a Sunday school. He replied in writing: "I was early called to this work by the voice of the spirit, and I have felt many times that I have been ordained to this work before I was born, for even before I joined the Church, I was moved upon to work for the young. Surely no more joyful nor profitable labor can be performed by an Elder. There is growth in the young. The seed sown in their hearts is more likely to bring forth fruit than when sown in the hearts of those who are more advanced in years. Furthermore, I had passed through much trouble, had been sorely tried by friends and foes, and in it all the gospel had proved such a solace to me that I was very desirous that all the children of the Saints should learn to prize it as I valued it. And more, I saw that the children, from the very nature and circumstances of the people, were being neglected, and I wanted to gather them into the school where they could learn not to read and write, but the goodness of God, and the true gospel of salvation given by Jesus Christ." In this way he was engaged temporally and spiritually, when in the fall of 1852, he was called to go on a mission to Hindoostan, India. After a long and perilous voyage, he arrived, with twelve other Elders, in Calcutta, July 24, 1853. In St. Thomas Mount, near Madras, he helped to organize a branch, Aug. 3, 1853, with three members, he having been appointed to labor in that vicinity, with Elders Robert Owen and Robert Skelton. He also published several issues of the "Millennial Star and Monthly Visitor," in which many of his writings on the gospel are set forth. Sailing for England, via Cape of Good Hope, July 25, 1854, he arrived in London, Dec. 6, 1854, and then made his way, in charge of a company of Saints, to St. Louis, Mo., via New Orleans. In the spring of 1855 he was placed in charge of a company of emigrants numbering about five hundred, with fifty wagons, all of whom arrived in Salt Lake City in first class condition, Sept. 25, 1855. Thus, in so early a day, he had encompassed the earth on his mission. He was met by Pres. George A. Smith, who remarked: "You have accomplished a journey around the world without purse or scrip, and brought in your company with a band of music and flags flying." Immediately upon his arrival, Pres. Young appointed him to a home mission to preach to the Saints in the well-remembered "reformation." In this he devoted his time till May, 1857. He was married to Mary Pearce, Nov. 27, 1855, and about two years later to Caroline Sanderson. Taking a fencing contract on the Jordan, after his release, he earned a team with which, making several trips, he moved his family to Nephi, prior to the coming of Johnston's army. Here he remained farming for two years, raising 400 bushels of wheat each season, returning to Salt Lake City in the fall of 1859. In 1860, having been offered a $3,000 stock of merchandise, he removed to Ogden, becoming one of the first business men of that city, where he opened a store and prospered exceedingly. Reasons of a religious nature induced him to quit business and go to farming: Brigham Young had [p.706] publicly said that "unless the Elders of the Church quit their merchandising, they will all go to hell." He thought so much of his religion, and believed in the word of President Young (although the latter had privately told him to do as his judgment dictated) to such an extent that he immediately abandoned his business pursuit. Said he: "I did not want to go to hell, and I had previously noticed that nearly every 'Mormon' merchant I had known had apostatized." He then purchased a farm in Eden, Ogden valley, where he raised some large crops, and had six successively destroyed by grasshoppers.
He assisted in building the Union Pacific railway in 1868, and also the Central Pacific. He became the manager, later, of a combination of three cooperative stores, on call from Pres. Franklin D. Richards, which he afterwards purchased and closed out in 1871. For the next six years he returned to farming, until, in May, 1877, he sold his farm and purchased the "Ogden Junction," established in 1870, successfully publishing the paper for eighteen months, to November, 1878, when he sold out. Then he went to railroading, helping to build the Oregon Short Line. Returning in 1881, he entered 480 acres of land under the Davis and Weber Counties Canal, and, with others, began and completed the stupendous task of building that waterway. In 1889 he sold his interests for $16,000 and purchased the lumber business of Bernard White. The "boom" in Ogden followed; he was induced to dabble in real estate, which, with reverses in business, brought about by the panic of 1893, completely ruined him financially, and doubtless hastened his death, which took place in Ogden, on Nov. 8, 1898. Elder Ballantyne was fourteen years a member of the Weber county court, and several times an alderman in Ogden city, with an unimpeachable record for honesty and conscientious work. In 1872 he was chosen superintendent of Sabbath schools for Weber Stake, which position he held and magnified until death. Prior to this, he was a zealous worker in the schools, being the founder of the Sunday school idea in Weber, as well as he had been in Salt Lake City. From him and from his labor the work gradually extended to the whole Church. He helped to erect the Central and other schoolhouses, being one of the trustees, and was ever an advocate of the system of schools which would place a good common school education within easy reach of the people. He was the senior member of the High Council at his death, having been a member thereof for over seventeen years. Here he was known as a firm defender of the right, and a lover of fair play and justice. Aug. 26, 1897, he was honored by a public celebration of his natal day, he being then eighty years old. Thousands of children, with their teachers from all parts of the county, marched in procession through the streets of Ogden, with music and banners, in his honor; at Lester Park, where the festivities were continued, he was literally covered with a wilderness of flowers, contributed by the little ones from every settlement and Ward in the county. The Sunday schools, upon request of General Superintendent George Q. Cannon, contributed towards assisting him to build a small home in which the last three months of his life were spent in quiet peace, marred only by the weakness of his body. He was conscious to the last, and full of ideas and plans for the progress and welfare of the schools. His work in this line kept him young in spirit, his interests being entwined about the hosts of Sunday School children whom he dearly loved. Elder Ballantyne was, in his early days, very strict and sometimes austere; close in business, but strictly honest. In later years, he was full of sympathy and affection. He was a strong-minded man, but ever moved by justice to the oppressed, and mercy to the sinner and the weak. He was one of the strong characters common to the pioneers and the early members of the "Mormon" Church to whose cause his whole soul was devoted.
He was a thorough Christian, of whom it is truly said: "He sought first the kingdom of God and his righteousness." His labors and devotion to Zion, and his noble life, will shed sunshine upon many generations yet to be. Edward H. Anderson.

Company:
Richard Ballantyne Company (1855)
Narrative:
Most people in the fourth emigrant company of 1855 were Perpetual Emigration Fund (PEF) passengers who, under Elder Richard Ballantyne, had traveled from Liverpool, England, to America aboard the ship Charles Buck. Ballantyne himself was a returning missionary (he had served in India). The ship sailed on January 17 and, after an eventful 56-day voyage, arrived at New Orleans March 14. The passengers next boarded the steamboat Michigan and traveled up the Mississippi to St. Louis, arriving there March 27. Ballantyne and about 250 of his party then continued up the Missouri to Atchison, Kansas Territory, on the riverboat Golden State, arriving April 5. (Some who joined Ballantyne's overland train crossed the Atlantic on the ship Helious to New Orleans. At least one traveler came on the Siddons, landing at Philadelphia, then traveling by rail to Atchison. Others came on the Chimborazo via Philidelphia.)

Atchison, the Mormon outfitting point for plains travel, was a newly established town. When Elder Ballantyne and party arrived, it did not have a boat landing or streets, and there were only six houses. The emigrants helped create streets, worked at a sawmill, and built a boat landing. Next, the company moved to Mormon Grove (a few miles from Atchison), where Church officials had claimed land. There, the travelers established a 160-acre PEF farm. By July 7, they had completed a ditch and a log fence and had ploughed and planted about 40 acres. A few crops were already growing. Cattle had to be broken and teamsters had to be trained. This was accomplished by having the men yoke the oxen and drag logs around the camp. All PEF passengers received food for the plains but, if they could afford it, they could add a few luxuries. Because of Indian hostilities, Church officials announced that "every male capable of bearing arms, must be supplied with a good rifle or other fire-arms, and at least one-half pound of powder and two pounds of lead, or shot and balls." The Church provided guns to some men.

Ballantyne and 402 Saints left Mormon Grove for Utah about July 1. The train included 45 wagons, 220 oxen, 24 cows, 3 horses, and 1 mule. Each wagon carried 700 pounds of flour, 200 pounds of corn meal, and 1,100 pounds of baggage, plus spokes and axel trees, hinges, and cooking utensils. From Big Blue River on July 10, the Captain reported, "We have had no cholera nor sickness of any kind, except what may reasonably be expected among so many people." He had learned that grasshoppers had attacked Utah's crops and "everything is eaten up in the Valley" and in "the grass for fifty miles on this side." On July 22 he wrote from the Platte River, just below Fort Kearny, that the train was surrounded by "great multitudes" of buffalo. On the 23rd, he wrote: "We have not been hindered a day since we started, but have traveled on slowly and steadily, Sundays excepted. . . . Owing to the fatigues of the journey and the frustrations and excitement produced by unruly cattle, some unwillingness was first manifest on the part of a few to stand up like men in the discharge of camp duty; but this spirit and feeling is gradually disappearing. . . . TheBell is rung around the coral [sic] and tents at 4 o'clock each morning for all the people to get out of bed. In a quarter of an hour after the roll is called, each man is required to be on the ground with his gun to answer when his name is called. A short time is then generally spent in military duty. . . . The spirit of hurrying has not yet troubled us, yet we have felt to use all diligence as the season is somewhat advanced, our provisions are very limited. . . . We intend being as judicious as possible with our provisions, yet we shall need some supplies before reaching the Valley as we only had in flour to serve us to Green River. . . . Brother Thursting's [Thurston's] train traveled with us several days. . . ."

On July 24, 20 miles above Fort Kearney, the company paused to commemorate Brigham Young's 1847 arrival in Utah-feasting, parading, and dancing to the music of the violin and dulcimer. From July 28 on, the men carried loaded guns while on guard duty. Later, Captain Ballantyne ordered all men not otherwise employed to walk ahead of the company with their weapons at the ready; all were admonished to be minutemen (a total of 80 armed men available). By August 3rd the train was north of the South Platte River. At Ash Hollow the emigrants gathered currants and cherries; the trees were "literally bent down with the weight of the fruit." The train was within sight of Chimney Rock on August 9th and had arrived at Scotts Bluff on the 12th. From Fort Laramie (August 15) the captain wrote: "Unity and peace prevails among us. No stampedes . . . . The feed has been good. The roads between Ash Hollow and Laramie have been rather heavy. . . . Our cattle stand the journey well. The Indians are peaceable." Later, feed became scarce and "lots of Cattle lay down and died foot Soar [and for] lack of feed &c." The company was at Bitterwood Creek on the 17th and at La Bonte on the 20th.

A passing traveler wrote: "The saints in this company seemed to enjoy the journey very much though most of them walked almost the entire distance. It was not a little wonderful to me, to see ladies with whom I was acquainted in the east, and knew as sickly and delicate, unable to walk three or four squares, to market or shopping, without experiencing much fatigue, walk fifteen or twenty miles a day, and come into camp at night with light hearts, singing the songs of Zion, and praising their God. . . . Capt. Ballantyne, is indefatigable in his exertions to promote the well being of the Saints under his charge, and enjoys the unbounded confidence and esteem of his entire company. We journeyed with this company until the morning of the 24th [Aug.], when we left them two miles above Deer Creek." The train reached the Platte Bridge on August 25.

At the Sweetwater River, 16 wagons were involved in a stampede, and it took half a day to repair broken wheels and tongues. By then the train was out of provisions and the travelers faced starvation. Fortunately, a few days later, on Little Sandy, the company met supply wagons from the Salt Lake Valley. That night the people celebrated until late in the evening. On August 29 the company was at Independence Rock; by September 16 it was at Fort Bridger. On September 24, the Nauvoo brass band, accompanied by many citizens of Salt Lake City, came to meet the company. With them were President Erastus Snow and wife and sister Ballantyne. These visitors joined the emigrants in feasting, dancing, singing, and praying. Women and some men wept for joy. The next day the train paraded into town. The band, on horseback, rode at the head of the company, playing. Then followed a large flag borne by two young horsemen. Several small flags floated from the tops of the wagons. Reportedly, the emigrants were all smiles. After the company set up camp on Union Square, Presidents Young and Kimball visited, bidding the travelers welcome. On this trip eight individuals had been run over, three were accidentally shot, and five died. Three courts had been held on the plains.

Huldah Maria CLARK was born on 26 Oct 1823 in New York, United States. She died 1 on 2 Apr 1883 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. Huldah married 2, 3 Richard BALLANTYNE on 18 Feb 1847 in Winter Quarters, Douglas, Nebraska, United States.

How I loved this beautiful woman, my father's first wife. How many happy days I have spent at her dear home with her and her beautiful family all of whom I loved almost as dearly as my own mother's children. She was truly a beautiful character and I thought her one of the sweetest and best woman I ever knew.

Her eyes were a very dark brown, her hair black and wavy, which later became grey and which she always kept well combed. She was of medium height and quite slender, always very pleasant and kind, an ideal housekeeper, clean, tidy, industrious, saving and treated my mother like a sister. My mother and her children were made welcome in her home and my mother returned the same kindness to her and her children.

by Caroline Josephine  Ballantyne

Marriage Notes:

Family Group Sheet-Self


Richard BALLANTYNE [Parents] [scrapbook] was born 1 on 26 Aug 1817 in Whiterigg Bog, Roxburghshire, Scotland, United Kingdom. He died 2 on 8 Nov 1898 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. He was buried on 13 Nov 1898. Richard married Mary PEARCE on 27 Nov 1855 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States.

Other marriages:
CLARK, Huldah Maria
SANDERSON, Caroline Albertine

Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, p.733
BALLANTYNE, RICHARD (son of David Ballantyne, born 1748 near Roxburgh, Scotland, and died Dec. 12, 1831, and Ann Bannerman, born 1789 at Dundee, Scotland; married Oct. 28, 1808). Born Aug. 26, 1817, at Earlston, Berwick, Scotland. Came to Utah Sept. 20, 1848, Brigham Young company.
Married Huldah Meriah Clark Feb. 18, 1847 (daughter of Gardner Clark and Delecta Farrer who were married 1813 at Geneseo, N. Y.; the former died 1847 at Winter Quarters, Iowa, and the latter came to Utah 1848). She was born Oct. 26, 1823, and came to Utah with husband. Their children: Richard Alando b. June 1, 1848, m. Mary Ann Stewart Dec. 27, 1875; Delecta Annie Jane b. Nov. 22, 1849, m. Louis F. Moench Feb. 15, 1874; David Henry b. Nov. 16, 1851, d. Aug. 31, 1863; Meriah Cedenia b. June 25, 1856, m. Austin C. Brown Feb. 2, 1874; John Taylor b. Dec. 28, 1857, m. Mahala E. Wilson March 18, 1885; Annie b. July 15, 1860, m. Louis F. Moench; Roseltha b. March 10, 1862, m. Jesse G. Stratford Nov. 23, 1882; Isabella b. Aug. 3, 1864, m. Louis Alvin West Nov. 23, 1882; Joseph b. Feb. 20, 1868, m. Rosannah A. Brown. Family homes Salt Lake City, Nephi, Ogden and Eden, Utah.
Married Mary Pearce Nov. 27, 1855, Salt Lake City, Utah (daughter of Edward Pearce and Elizabeth Bennett), who was born Oct. 1, 1828, at Ratcliffe, London, Eng., and came to Utah Sept. 25, 1855, with her husband's company. Their children: Zachariah b. Oct. 31, 1856, m. Martha Ferrin; Mary Elizabeth b. Sept. 7, 1858, m. Willard Farr; Jane Susannah b. Feb. 10, 1861, m. Edward H. Anderson; James Edward b. Nov. 1, 1863, m. Sarah H. Critchlow; Eliza Jane b. June 8, 1866, m. Henry J. Garner; Heber Charles b. Feb. 28, 1867, m. Ada Belnap. Family resided at Salt Lake City, Nephi and Ogden, Utah.
Married Caroline Albertine Sanderson Nov. 7, 1856, at Salt Lake City (daughter of Kanute Alexanderson and Ingebor Christina Larsen), who was born Sept. 19, 1837, at Roken, Norway. Their children: Thomas Henry b. Dec. 12, 1858, m. Martha Carstensen Sept. 6, 1883; Caroline Josephine b. Jan. 30. 1861, m.Marcus Farr; Matilda b. Dec. 30, 1862, d. Sept. 4, 1882; Catherine Mena b. Dec. 29, 1864, d. Nov. 18, 1866; Jedediah b. Nov. 18, 1867, m. Nettie Wilson; Brigham b. Feb. 18, 1871; Laura Elizabeth b. June 23, 1874. Family resided at Salt Lake City, Nephi, Ogden and Eden.
Missionary to Hindoostan, India, 1852, laboring in Calcutta and Madras, and publishing a paper there. Brought a company of immigrants to Utah Sept. 25, 1855. Pioneer to the Salmon river 1857 and returning moved to Nephi, 1857, and to Ogden 1860; located the town of Eden 1866, and there served as bishop until 1871. High councilor 37 years and superintendent Sunday schools of Weber stake. Organized the first Sunday school in the dominant church December, 1849, and therefore is known as "father of the Sunday schools." County commissioner of Weber county 12 years; alderman of Ogden several terms; school trustee. Publisher and editor of "Ogden Junction" 1877. Merchant and farmer.

LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, Andrew Jenson, Vol. 1, p.703 Ballantyne, Richard, founder of the great Sunday School system of the Latter-day Saints, was born in Whitridgebog, Roxburgshire, Scotland, Aug. 26, 1817, son of David Ballantyne and Ann Bannerman. Both his parents were born in Scotland, his father in Merton or Earlston, in 1743, and his mother, in the Highlands, in 1784. His father was first married to Cecelia Wallace, who died leaving three children, William, Henry and Margaret, all of whom died in Scotland. When sixty years of age he married his second wife who was then nineteen years of age. Her children's names and the dates of their birth are as follows: Ann, born Aug. 7, 1809; died Feb. 10, 1819. Peter, born June 15, 1811; died in Ogden, Sept. 12, 1893. Jane, born April 11, 1813, died in Salt Lake City Dec. 26, 1900. Robert, born Dec. 9, 1815; died in infancy. Richard, born Aug. 26, 1817; died in Ogden, Nov. 8, 1898. Annie, born Sept. 2. 1819. James, born August, 1821; died in 1833; buried in Earlston cemetery. Richard's father, David Ballantyne, a large, handsome man, six feet tall and weighing over 200 pounds, died in 1829, in Springhall, near Kelso, Roxburgshire, Scotland, and was buried in Ednam churchyard, without hearing the gospel; but he was a good, devout and faithful follower of Christ, and a lover of his divine truth and mission. His mother and all her family joined the Church, becoming devout believers in the doctrines of Christ as restored through the Prophet Joseph Smith. After gathering to Nauvoo, Ill., with her family in 1843, she continued a faithful member of the Church, cheerfully bearing all the severe trials and privations of the expulsion the travels in the wilderness, and the settling of a new country in the Salt Lake valley, finally passing away from the troubles of this life in peace, in October, 1871. She was buried in the Salt Lake City cemetery, in the lot of President John Taylor, who had married her daughters Jane and Annie. Richard Ballantyne, who was early taught to be moral and religious, was baptized by sprinkling when an infant, into the "Relief Presbyterian Church," being later taught in its doctrines. When twenty-one years of age he became an elder, and later a ruling elder whose duties consisted cf visiting among the members with the priest, and looking after the finances of the church, in which he was greatly blessed. It was while still a young man that he began his labors as a Sunday school teacher, which work he [p.704] continued to his dying day. After due investigation, he was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by Elder Henry McCune, president of the branch in Edinburgh, in the waters of Leith, on a beautiful moonlight night, in December, 1842. "All nature seemed to be at peace," he writes; "to look at the broad expanse of waters, and to contemplate the mysteries of the unfathomed deep, might well suggest the mysteries of the unknown future that now lay before me; and what if a picture thereof had been unfolded to me! What would I have seen?" What, indeed, but persecution at home; pilgrimage to a foreign land; tempestuous seas; Nauvoo, with its sore trials and martyred Prophet and Patriarch; the pioneer journey over the deserts to the Rocky Mountains, surrounded by wild beasts and savages, in the midst of sickness, hunger and death; the new and barren home where there was supreme war with the elements and crickets for a scant livelihood; himself, moved upon by the spirit of God to build a house, without money or other help, in which to teach the children the gospel of Jesus Christ, and establish the Sunday Schools which, under the fostering hand of God's providence, were to grow in his lifetime to be a mighty aid in God's "marvelous work and a wonder;" travels over unknown seas to proclaim the gospel to the heathen, until, without purse or scrip, he should girdle the earth in his mission of love; the peculiar days of the "Reformation" in his desert home; the armies of the nation unwittingly sent to Utah with a view to accomplish what other trials and sufferings had failed to achieve; again the abandonment of home in the "Move;" the return in peace and the marvelous growth of his chosen people until the silence of the mountain valleys is broken by the voice of thrift and industry; himself standing as the husband of three wives, and father of twenty-two children, and over one hundred grandchildren, with sons-in-law, and daughters-in-law; the "raid" and legal persecution of 1882-90, with its fearful apprehensions, imprisonments and fines; the light and prosperity of the decade closing the nineteenth century, darkened to him by financial failure; the end of his days, marked by the peace of a life well spent; and the joy of beholding a united and honored family, and having a mind full of faith and hope and trust in God, which could in the end exclaim: "I know that my Redeemer lives." Having at length reviewed most of these incidents, he writes: "The foregoing, to show how wise it is in God to keep the future mostly hidden from our view!" As to the employments of his life up to this time: When seven years of age, he herded his mother's cows on the public roads: at ten he tended garden, walks, and the lawn of a wealthy gentleman, working also on the farm; from twelve to fourteen, he worked exclusively on the farm. His education was obtained during the time from nine to fourteen that he occasionally attended school, mostly in the winter months. At fourteen he was apprenticed as a baker, to a Mr. Gray, serving three years. When he was sixteen, he was made foreman of the business; he also served one year as baker's foreman in Kelso, under a Mr. Riddle. His former master, Gray, dying, he purchased his business for $25 and became his own master, for five years conducting his business in Earlston; quitting to remove to Nauvoo when he quit baking forever, for he never liked it. Leaving his native country in 1843, with his mother, two sisters and a brother, he came by way of New Orleans, to Nauvoo, Ill. Here he became the manager and bookkeeper of the Coach and Carriage Association, where many of the wagons were built which aided the first emigrants to cross the plains to Utah. In 1846, he settled the affairs of John Taylor's printing establishment, hired a flouring mill with Peter Slater, 36 miles east of Nauvoo, and he also engaged in farming on the east bank of the Missouri river. During the troubles in Nauvoo, he with others, was in the hands of the mob for over two weeks, suffering greatly from exposure and hardship. In 1846 he went with the scattered remnants of Nauvoo to Winter Quarters, where he remained about eighteen months, until May 18, 1848, at which date he started for the Valley, crossing the plains in Pres. Brigham Young's company, which arrived in Salt Lake City in September. In the year previous, he married Huldah Meriah Clark, and their first son, Richard, was born while crossing the plains. Arriving at the "Old Fort," he again went to farming, on [p.705] Mill creek. He lost his crop for three years in succession, and finally obtained five acres on Canyon creek. Here a terrific hail storm destroyed his crop. In 1846, he was ordained a Seventy by Pres. Joseph Young, and shortly thereafter a High Priest by Apostle John Taylor, which latter office in the Church he held and honored to the time of his death.
He labored with constancy in the Priesthood, considering all his duties a pleasure, but his Sabbath school labors were his chief delight. Upon arriving in the Valley, he immediately began to consider how the moral and spiritual welfare of the children might be advanced; and, having obtained a little home, he asked his Bishop for permission to establish a Sunday school. Permission was granted, but there was no prospect for obtaining a house to meet in for months to come. Under this predicament, he resolved to build an addition to his home, and there begin the work. In the summer of 1849 he hauled rock from the Cottonwood quarries and laid the foundation of red sand stone, and also made the adobes, hauled logs to the saw mill for a share of the lumber, exchanged work with a carpenter who made the doors and windows, and so the first Sunday school house was built, and the first school, numbering some fifty students, was held in it on the second Sunday in December, 1849. Later it was held in the Fourteenth Ward meeting house. I asked him at one time, why he was so desirous of organizing a Sunday school. He replied in writing: "I was early called to this work by the voice of the spirit, and I have felt many times that I have been ordained to this work before I was born, for even before I joined the Church, I was moved upon to work for the young. Surely no more joyful nor profitable labor can be performed by an Elder. There is growth in the young. The seed sown in their hearts is more likely to bring forth fruit than when sown in the hearts of those who are more advanced in years. Furthermore, I had passed through much trouble, had been sorely tried by friends and foes, and in it all the gospel had proved such a solace to me that I was very desirous that all the children of the Saints should learn to prize it as I valued it. And more, I saw that the children, from the very nature and circumstances of the people, were being neglected, and I wanted to gather them into the school where they could learn not to read and write, but the goodness of God, and the true gospel of salvation given by Jesus Christ." In this way he was engaged temporally and spiritually, when in the fall of 1852, he was called to go on a mission to Hindoostan, India. After a long and perilous voyage, he arrived, with twelve other Elders, in Calcutta, July 24, 1853. In St. Thomas Mount, near Madras, he helped to organize a branch, Aug. 3, 1853, with three members, he having been appointed to labor in that vicinity, with Elders Robert Owen and Robert Skelton. He also published several issues of the "Millennial Star and Monthly Visitor," in which many of his writings on the gospel are set forth. Sailing for England, via Cape of Good Hope, July 25, 1854, he arrived in London, Dec. 6, 1854, and then made his way, in charge of a company of Saints, to St. Louis, Mo., via New Orleans. In the spring of 1855 he was placed in charge of a company of emigrants numbering about five hundred, with fifty wagons, all of whom arrived in Salt Lake City in first class condition, Sept. 25, 1855. Thus, in so early a day, he had encompassed the earth on his mission. He was met by Pres. George A. Smith, who remarked: "You have accomplished a journey around the world without purse or scrip, and brought in your company with a band of music and flags flying." Immediately upon his arrival, Pres. Young appointed him to a home mission to preach to the Saints in the well-remembered "reformation." In this he devoted his time till May, 1857. He was married to Mary Pearce, Nov. 27, 1855, and about two years later to Caroline Sanderson. Taking a fencing contract on the Jordan, after his release, he earned a team with which, making several trips, he moved his family to Nephi, prior to the coming of Johnston's army. Here he remained farming for two years, raising 400 bushels of wheat each season, returning to Salt Lake City in the fall of 1859. In 1860, having been offered a $3,000 stock of merchandise, he removed to Ogden, becoming one of the first business men of that city, where he opened a store and prospered exceedingly. Reasons of a religious nature induced him to quit business and go to farming: Brigham Young had [p.706] publicly said that "unless the Elders of the Church quit their merchandising, they will all go to hell." He thought so much of his religion, and believed in the word of President Young (although the latter had privately told him to do as his judgment dictated) to such an extent that he immediately abandoned his business pursuit. Said he: "I did not want to go to hell, and I had previously noticed that nearly every 'Mormon' merchant I had known had apostatized." He then purchased a farm in Eden, Ogden valley, where he raised some large crops, and had six successively destroyed by grasshoppers.
He assisted in building the Union Pacific railway in 1868, and also the Central Pacific. He became the manager, later, of a combination of three cooperative stores, on call from Pres. Franklin D. Richards, which he afterwards purchased and closed out in 1871. For the next six years he returned to farming, until, in May, 1877, he sold his farm and purchased the "Ogden Junction," established in 1870, successfully publishing the paper for eighteen months, to November, 1878, when he sold out. Then he went to railroading, helping to build the Oregon Short Line. Returning in 1881, he entered 480 acres of land under the Davis and Weber Counties Canal, and, with others, began and completed the stupendous task of building that waterway. In 1889 he sold his interests for $16,000 and purchased the lumber business of Bernard White. The "boom" in Ogden followed; he was induced to dabble in real estate, which, with reverses in business, brought about by the panic of 1893, completely ruined him financially, and doubtless hastened his death, which took place in Ogden, on Nov. 8, 1898. Elder Ballantyne was fourteen years a member of the Weber county court, and several times an alderman in Ogden city, with an unimpeachable record for honesty and conscientious work. In 1872 he was chosen superintendent of Sabbath schools for Weber Stake, which position he held and magnified until death. Prior to this, he was a zealous worker in the schools, being the founder of the Sunday school idea in Weber, as well as he had been in Salt Lake City. From him and from his labor the work gradually extended to the whole Church. He helped to erect the Central and other schoolhouses, being one of the trustees, and was ever an advocate of the system of schools which would place a good common school education within easy reach of the people. He was the senior member of the High Council at his death, having been a member thereof for over seventeen years. Here he was known as a firm defender of the right, and a lover of fair play and justice. Aug. 26, 1897, he was honored by a public celebration of his natal day, he being then eighty years old. Thousands of children, with their teachers from all parts of the county, marched in procession through the streets of Ogden, with music and banners, in his honor; at Lester Park, where the festivities were continued, he was literally covered with a wilderness of flowers, contributed by the little ones from every settlement and Ward in the county. The Sunday schools, upon request of General Superintendent George Q. Cannon, contributed towards assisting him to build a small home in which the last three months of his life were spent in quiet peace, marred only by the weakness of his body. He was conscious to the last, and full of ideas and plans for the progress and welfare of the schools. His work in this line kept him young in spirit, his interests being entwined about the hosts of Sunday School children whom he dearly loved. Elder Ballantyne was, in his early days, very strict and sometimes austere; close in business, but strictly honest. In later years, he was full of sympathy and affection. He was a strong-minded man, but ever moved by justice to the oppressed, and mercy to the sinner and the weak. He was one of the strong characters common to the pioneers and the early members of the "Mormon" Church to whose cause his whole soul was devoted.
He was a thorough Christian, of whom it is truly said: "He sought first the kingdom of God and his righteousness." His labors and devotion to Zion, and his noble life, will shed sunshine upon many generations yet to be. Edward H. Anderson.

Company:
Richard Ballantyne Company (1855)
Narrative:
Most people in the fourth emigrant company of 1855 were Perpetual Emigration Fund (PEF) passengers who, under Elder Richard Ballantyne, had traveled from Liverpool, England, to America aboard the ship Charles Buck. Ballantyne himself was a returning missionary (he had served in India). The ship sailed on January 17 and, after an eventful 56-day voyage, arrived at New Orleans March 14. The passengers next boarded the steamboat Michigan and traveled up the Mississippi to St. Louis, arriving there March 27. Ballantyne and about 250 of his party then continued up the Missouri to Atchison, Kansas Territory, on the riverboat Golden State, arriving April 5. (Some who joined Ballantyne's overland train crossed the Atlantic on the ship Helious to New Orleans. At least one traveler came on the Siddons, landing at Philadelphia, then traveling by rail to Atchison. Others came on the Chimborazo via Philidelphia.)

Atchison, the Mormon outfitting point for plains travel, was a newly established town. When Elder Ballantyne and party arrived, it did not have a boat landing or streets, and there were only six houses. The emigrants helped create streets, worked at a sawmill, and built a boat landing. Next, the company moved to Mormon Grove (a few miles from Atchison), where Church officials had claimed land. There, the travelers established a 160-acre PEF farm. By July 7, they had completed a ditch and a log fence and had ploughed and planted about 40 acres. A few crops were already growing. Cattle had to be broken and teamsters had to be trained. This was accomplished by having the men yoke the oxen and drag logs around the camp. All PEF passengers received food for the plains but, if they could afford it, they could add a few luxuries. Because of Indian hostilities, Church officials announced that "every male capable of bearing arms, must be supplied with a good rifle or other fire-arms, and at least one-half pound of powder and two pounds of lead, or shot and balls." The Church provided guns to some men.

Ballantyne and 402 Saints left Mormon Grove for Utah about July 1. The train included 45 wagons, 220 oxen, 24 cows, 3 horses, and 1 mule. Each wagon carried 700 pounds of flour, 200 pounds of corn meal, and 1,100 pounds of baggage, plus spokes and axel trees, hinges, and cooking utensils. From Big Blue River on July 10, the Captain reported, "We have had no cholera nor sickness of any kind, except what may reasonably be expected among so many people." He had learned that grasshoppers had attacked Utah's crops and "everything is eaten up in the Valley" and in "the grass for fifty miles on this side." On July 22 he wrote from the Platte River, just below Fort Kearny, that the train was surrounded by "great multitudes" of buffalo. On the 23rd, he wrote: "We have not been hindered a day since we started, but have traveled on slowly and steadily, Sundays excepted. . . . Owing to the fatigues of the journey and the frustrations and excitement produced by unruly cattle, some unwillingness was first manifest on the part of a few to stand up like men in the discharge of camp duty; but this spirit and feeling is gradually disappearing. . . . TheBell is rung around the coral [sic] and tents at 4 o'clock each morning for all the people to get out of bed. In a quarter of an hour after the roll is called, each man is required to be on the ground with his gun to answer when his name is called. A short time is then generally spent in military duty. . . . The spirit of hurrying has not yet troubled us, yet we have felt to use all diligence as the season is somewhat advanced, our provisions are very limited. . . . We intend being as judicious as possible with our provisions, yet we shall need some supplies before reaching the Valley as we only had in flour to serve us to Green River. . . . Brother Thursting's [Thurston's] train traveled with us several days. . . ."

On July 24, 20 miles above Fort Kearney, the company paused to commemorate Brigham Young's 1847 arrival in Utah-feasting, parading, and dancing to the music of the violin and dulcimer. From July 28 on, the men carried loaded guns while on guard duty. Later, Captain Ballantyne ordered all men not otherwise employed to walk ahead of the company with their weapons at the ready; all were admonished to be minutemen (a total of 80 armed men available). By August 3rd the train was north of the South Platte River. At Ash Hollow the emigrants gathered currants and cherries; the trees were "literally bent down with the weight of the fruit." The train was within sight of Chimney Rock on August 9th and had arrived at Scotts Bluff on the 12th. From Fort Laramie (August 15) the captain wrote: "Unity and peace prevails among us. No stampedes . . . . The feed has been good. The roads between Ash Hollow and Laramie have been rather heavy. . . . Our cattle stand the journey well. The Indians are peaceable." Later, feed became scarce and "lots of Cattle lay down and died foot Soar [and for] lack of feed &c." The company was at Bitterwood Creek on the 17th and at La Bonte on the 20th.

A passing traveler wrote: "The saints in this company seemed to enjoy the journey very much though most of them walked almost the entire distance. It was not a little wonderful to me, to see ladies with whom I was acquainted in the east, and knew as sickly and delicate, unable to walk three or four squares, to market or shopping, without experiencing much fatigue, walk fifteen or twenty miles a day, and come into camp at night with light hearts, singing the songs of Zion, and praising their God. . . . Capt. Ballantyne, is indefatigable in his exertions to promote the well being of the Saints under his charge, and enjoys the unbounded confidence and esteem of his entire company. We journeyed with this company until the morning of the 24th [Aug.], when we left them two miles above Deer Creek." The train reached the Platte Bridge on August 25.

At the Sweetwater River, 16 wagons were involved in a stampede, and it took half a day to repair broken wheels and tongues. By then the train was out of provisions and the travelers faced starvation. Fortunately, a few days later, on Little Sandy, the company met supply wagons from the Salt Lake Valley. That night the people celebrated until late in the evening. On August 29 the company was at Independence Rock; by September 16 it was at Fort Bridger. On September 24, the Nauvoo brass band, accompanied by many citizens of Salt Lake City, came to meet the company. With them were President Erastus Snow and wife and sister Ballantyne. These visitors joined the emigrants in feasting, dancing, singing, and praying. Women and some men wept for joy. The next day the train paraded into town. The band, on horseback, rode at the head of the company, playing. Then followed a large flag borne by two young horsemen. Several small flags floated from the tops of the wagons. Reportedly, the emigrants were all smiles. After the company set up camp on Union Square, Presidents Young and Kimball visited, bidding the travelers welcome. On this trip eight individuals had been run over, three were accidentally shot, and five died. Three courts had been held on the plains.

Mary PEARCE was born on 1 Oct 1828 in London, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom. She died on 26 Nov 1912 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States. She was buried in 31 Nov 1912 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. Mary married Richard BALLANTYNE on 27 Nov 1855 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States.

My father's second wife was another lovely woman. She was rather under medium height, gray eyes, brown hair which she also kept neatly combed. Slender of build and a very active and energetic, industrious woman. A kind devoted wife and mother always on hand to help the sick and those who were in distress. I remember her kind ministrations to my mother in times of sickness, which kindness my mother was always ready and willing to return in her hour of trial.

I remember the many good times we have had at her home for she was full of fun and loved to "romp" with we children. We were truly blest of the Lord who were permitted to come to earth under this principal of Celestial marriage. It is with fond remembrance that I look back to the school associations of my childhood and girlhood days with my brothers and sisters, twenty two of us in all. I think no girl was ever more truly blest - than was I. I loved my father's wives, I loved his children and a trues better husband and father never lived than mine.

by Caroline Josephine  Ballantyne

They had the following children.

  F i Mary Elizabeth BALLANTYNE was born on 7 Sep 1858. She died on 13 May 1942.

Knud ALEXANDERSEN [Parents] [scrapbook] 1 was born on 20 Jan 1805 in Ostenstadeie, Asker, Askershus, Norway. Knud married 2 Ingeborg Christine LARSEN on 29 Feb 1836 in Norway.

of Roben (Roken) Am, Norway
Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, p.733

The following was taken from the journal of Caroline Josephine Ballantyne:

Wednesday the 15th of April 1914
I had my mother and Caroline Erekson Williams at our at our home also Vincy H. Barker that we might get some information regarding my mother's old home in Norway. We did obtain some and how they came to receive the Gospel. Sister Williams lived with my grandmother three years and knew something about the family. She was living there at the time Elders brought the Gospel. She said my great grandmother was the first in that locality to accept it.

Information regarding my mothers old home in Norway obtained from my Mother and Caroline Erickson Williams the before mentioned and spoken of on previous page.

My father Knut Alex Sanderson. Caroline Erickson Williams lived with them in the years 1851-1853. This is as she remembers it at the present time. My Grandfather was a freighter on his own sloop ? going between Norway, his home, and England and Germany, and Sweden and Greenland. His vessel was a sailing ship. My grandmother was also very industrious carrying on dressmaking and millinery at her home. Sister Williams said she had even seen her put on pants or trousers and paint the house outside and in, also the barn. She said she was a very clever woman and could do almost anything. She also said they were very good people.

All the weaving was done at home and Caroline (my Mother) helped with the spooling and quilling and also did fancy work such as bead work, hair work, needlework etc. My grandmother spun yarn sent it to be dyer to be colored or died the desired color and my mother wove it into two large shawls both black and one was worked
all around the edge with blue 4 and white tulips. The other in different shades or red roses and green leaves all don in solid embroidery work with berlin wool. The bead work was chains, necklaces, collars samples etc. She had a little loom to make the necklaces on.

Caroline (Erickson) Williams says while staying with my mothers folks she became too sick and went home for a short time and after she got better she went and stayed overnight with a school friend. That night she dreamed that someone came to my mothers home and gave to my great grandmother something that made her very happy. After (By the way my mothers folks belonged to the Lutheran Church, but it seemed to be mixed with Catholic as the minister always had a red cross on his shoulders when he administered the sacrament), she went back to my mothers home, one night a man who lived at the toll bridge over the river by her own home, came to the house and asked us to go to his house to hear some ministers preach, who were there. He said they were the ones who baptized people over again; of course we thought that was awful as we had been sprinkled and thought that was enough. Some of us were in bed and some were up but we all went anyway, Grandmother, Mother, Caroline, the hired boy, and myself. As we approached the house, we heard the Elders singing and I thought it was the most Heavenly music I ever heard and it always stayed right in my breast. We went in and such preaching we had never heard. We did not get our eyes open that night, but were deeply impressed. These were local elders and were as follows, Jappe Folkman, Olson and Hansen. The place was Kyvelsrod, Onsen about seven miles from Frederickstadt, Norway.

The next morning we went to the house to tell the Elders to come to our house if ever they were hungry for food. So the first time they came back one of them (Olson) came and converted the grandmother. I remember them sitting, reading in the testament. He went back and forth several times and in a month we were all baptized on a Wednesday before the Sunday we should have been confirmed in the Lutheran Church. So we went to the minister on Saturday and told him what we had been doing. He got so angry and sorry too, the tears Just rolled down his silk vest. Then they had the Elders arrested and thrown into prison. We were brought into court to testify. They told all kinds of lies one of which was that they saw the Grandmothers wig floating down stream. She never wore a wig in her life. The Elders were kept in prison all winter and Brother Olson broke out in sores because of the lack of nourishing food and unsanitary condition. I believe there were eight of them.

We were mobbed several times while the Elders were in prison. They preached to the night watchman and converted him. We would take a basket of provisions from the Sanderson home and hide it in the bushes until night then take it to the Elders. (Words of Caroline Erickson Williams and my mother was here also.)

Ingeborg Christine LARSEN [Parents] [scrapbook] was born on 25 Mar 1813 in of Royken, Buskerud, Norway. She died after 6 Sep 1868 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States. Ingeborg married 1 Knud ALEXANDERSEN on 29 Feb 1836 in Norway.

Other marriages:
SEBYE, Henry Erikson

Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, p.733
For more info see husband's notes.


TRANSLATION OF AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF
INGEBOR KRISTINE LARSEN, MOTHER OF
CAROLINE ALBERTINE SANDERSON BALLANTYNE

My half sister, Anna Berthea, b. February, 1806, d. April 17, 1838 My cousin, Karen Hans daughter Hagum, b. 1 Feb. 1819, d. 4 Nov. 1850. A seamstress of my best friend, Hagaina Lars daughter Elnea, b. 8 April 1828. In the year 1813, 25th of March, was I, Ingeborg Kristine, born of parents, d. 18 Feb. 1847, Tollef Larsen and Berte, Jacob's daughter. They have had much sorrow and trials for me because of the sickness I have had. It started when I was four years old according to what my parents say. When I was fourteen and one half years old I was confirmed. That same day I was near death from worms, and that same sickness increased, more and more, and I was near death many times in the six months since March 1828. I was healed from the worms with worm medicine and julip. (105 great worms, the biggest a half year long.) I was very glad and thought now I will be well. But that was not the case. My whole body was ruined by medicine. I had lots of pain in my limbs. Big blisters on my whole body and the skin came off. In May, 1828, I got a terrible headache, which lasted from May, 1828 to April 14, 1829. At that time I was with a woman Drovak. I took care of my teeth. I was not able to do any work, so I started to make hats and sew and sell hats and do other kinds of sewing. I had several who learned to sew from me, and I paid by the month. God s providence has been great towards me. In 1832, 4th of October, I was engaged to Knud Alexanderson and married him in 1836, 29th of Feb. I had so much sickness and trouble it cannot be described. In 1837, Sept. 19th, Caroline Albertine was born and I thought now I would be better, but the pain increased more and more and the child could not nurse more than five months because I had to start the medicine again. I drank a lot of sasparalla and other medicine for three years but it did not help. In 1840, in the winter, my right hand and foot became so stiff I couldn t use them. I was now a cripple and it grieved me more than anything, and I prayed God to help because man could not. At last he heard my prayer. A wise woman in Christiania gave me medicine that the Lord blessed and the pain ceased and I slept for ten hours. That was the greatest rest I had had for many months, for the pain was so intense I could not rest in bed and I could not stand the cold of the winter. I had to have a cloth before my face and see through that. When now I got relief my joy was great. After I used this medicine I could bend my fingers and little by little stand on my foot. I shall never forget that great blessing and I thank the Lord for it. I was not lame nor stiff any more.

In 1846, 3rd May, we left our friends and relatives in Røgen and moved to Onsogn and my sickness went with me, though it was not so severe as it had been. I always prayed to the Lord that He would help me, that I should not suffer forever. Then the time would pass, both I and my mother prepared for death as well as we understood, for we knew our troubles would be over and we rejoiced in that. We began to be tired. I over my whole body and mother in her legs. So we thought maybe we had dropsy, which disease nearly always brings death and thus we hoped our troubles would be over; but that was not God s will, even though it was ours. In 1852, Sept. 15, we heard the gospel of Jesus Christ and we accepted it with gladness and joy. Mother was baptized Sept. 22, 1852, and our servant girl Karen Erikson and my daughter Caroline Sanderson. On 27th Sept. our man servant, Ole Elingsen and our servant girl Nikoline Erikson and her brother, Anders, man servant, they all lived with us. Now we were all one and our joy was great. We could hardly eat or sleep for many days. We sang and prayed all in our own words and God gave us many visions and showed us wonderful things which I will not or cannot describe, but it strengthened our faith and we knew it was God's work. He also gave my health back through the laying on of hands of the Elders who had authority from Him. I had not been baptized because I had not my husband's permission, but I had such great faith that those that brought the gospel had the same power that Jesus had. We saw that power and there was light and power everywhere. Persecution started and the brethren were arrested. They had to go to court to testify. That lasted for seven months. The greatest persecution for me was my husband who was against the gospel and against my faith, though he went against his own will and desire and let me be baptized. I was baptized May 18, 1853. I prayed eagerly to God for him. God let him understand the scriptures, but he would not obey. He was good to me. On the 21st of Nov. 1854, we left our fatherland, our property, relatives and friends, and my husband which was hardest for me to leave, and began our journey to Zion.

We were happy and all lived and came to Salt Lake on the 7th of Sept. 1855. Praise be to the Lord for his goodness. On the 17th of Nov.1856, I was married to Henry Erikson Sebye. In Feb. 1861 we got our first endowment and my mother, Berte Jacob's daughter, Berte Pedersen (which is her father's father's name) gr. Father's name) was sealed to Mr. Sebye. A great joy for us that we could be together for eternity. On the 18th of Dec. 1867 we got our second endowments where I wrote my mother's name as Berte Pedersen. I regretted that later in case it should be wrong. She said I should have written Berte, Jacob's daughter (Jacobsen). I write this for a remembrance. If it will be of any use to anybody I don' t know.

Mill Creek Ward, 6th of Sept. 1868

Ingebor Kristine Erikson

The foregoing was given to Caroline Albertine Sanderson Ballantyne by her mother, Ingebor Kristine Larsen. It was written in Norwegian and was translated for a great granddaughter, Josephine Farr Lundwall.

They had the following children.

  F i Caroline Albertine SANDERSON was born on 19 Sep 1837. She died on 18 Oct 1926.

Thomas Henry BALLANTYNE [Parents] [scrapbook] was born on 12 Dec 1858 in Nephi, Juab, Utah, United States. He died on 27 May 1923 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. He was buried on 29 May 1923 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. Thomas married Martha Albertine CARSTENSEN on 6 Sep 1883 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States.

Martha Albertine CARSTENSEN. Martha married Thomas Henry BALLANTYNE on 6 Sep 1883 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States.


Parley WRIGHT. Parley married Bertha Matilda BALLANTYNE.

Bertha Matilda BALLANTYNE [Parents] [scrapbook] was born 1 on 30 Dec 1863 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. She died 2 on 5 Sep 1882. Bertha married Parley WRIGHT.


Jedediah BALLANTYNE [Parents] [scrapbook] was born on 18 Nov 1867 in Eden, Weber, Utah, United States. He died on 4 Nov 1950 in Henderson, Clark, Nevada, United States. He was buried on 8 Nov 1950 in Ogden City Cemetery, Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. Jedediah married Jane Wilkie MANNING. The marriage ended in divorce.

Other marriages:
WILSON, Esther Vinetta

Jane Wilkie MANNING was born on 1 May 1866 in Wilson, Weber, Utah, United States. Jane married Jedediah BALLANTYNE. The marriage ended in divorce.


Jedediah BALLANTYNE [Parents] [scrapbook] was born on 18 Nov 1867 in Eden, Weber, Utah, United States. He died on 4 Nov 1950 in Henderson, Clark, Nevada, United States. He was buried on 8 Nov 1950 in Ogden City Cemetery, Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. Jedediah married Esther Vinetta WILSON on 24 May 1899 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States.

Other marriages:
MANNING, Jane Wilkie

Esther Vinetta WILSON was born on 6 Jun 1873 in Wilson, Weber, Utah, United States. She died on 18 Oct 1948 in Boulder, Clark, Nevada, United States. Esther married Jedediah BALLANTYNE on 24 May 1899 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States.


Brigham BALLANTYNE [Parents] [scrapbook] was born on 16 Feb 1870/1871 in Eden, Weber, Utah, United States. He died on 14 Jun 1913 in Idaho, United States. Brigham married Mary DALTON on 11 Mar 1894 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States.

Mary DALTON was born on 15 Feb 1876 in Hooper, Weber, Utah, United States. She died on 30 May 1937. Mary married Brigham BALLANTYNE on 11 Mar 1894 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States.

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