Ancestors of Tim Farr and The Descendants of Stephen Farr


John BAKER [Parents] 1 was born in 1598 in of Norwich, Norfolk, England, United Kingdom. He died in Topsfield, Essex, Massachusetts, United States. John married 2 Elizabeth in BY 1633 in Mancroft, Norfolk, England, United Kingdom.

Elizabeth was born in 1606 in Norwich, Norfolk, England, United Kingdom. She died in Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts, United States. Elizabeth married 1 John BAKER in BY 1633 in Mancroft, Norfolk, England, United Kingdom.

They had the following children.

  F i Elizabeth BAKER was born about 1645. She died on 10 Dec 1708.
  M ii
John BAKER 1.
  M iii
Thomas BAKER 1.

Roger MOWRY [Parents] [scrapbook] 1, 2, 3 was born about 1612 in Herne Hill, Surrey, England, United Kingdom. He died 4 on 5 Jan 1666 in Providence, Providence, Rhode Island, United States. Roger married 5, 6 Mary JOHNSON about 1636 in Roxbury, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States.

Roger Mowry who came from England to, Boston in 1631. After marrying here and  moving about several times, Roger Mowry settled permanently in Providence county, Rhode Island, where his descendants remained for many generations.

There have been four Mowry genealogies published; three by William A. Mowry. One of these covers Roger Mowry, son, Nathaniel, and his descendants; one covers Nathaniel's brother, John's descendants; one covers Richard Mowry, heading the fifth generation of one line of the descendants of Nathaniel; and the other covers Augustus Mowry, heading the sixth generation  of another line of the descendants of Nathaniel. Many of these early Mowrys were Quakers, and the descendants of Richard were predominantly so.

In addition to these genealogies, Mr. Arlon Mowry has, at his own expense, erected near the city of Woonsockett Rhode Island, a huge white bronze monument 51/2 feet square by 16 feet high on which are inscribed the first several generations of the descendants of Roger Mowry.

There were originally many different ways of spelling the name, such as Mory, Morey, Morie, Moury, Moorey, Moorie, Mooree, Mawrey, Mawry, and Mowry, but soon Mowry became the most used. However, about 1880, the members of our subject, Philips line, adopted the "Morey" spelling, but other lines have adhered to the "Mowry" spelling to this day. The adoption of the "Morey"  spelling was influenced by the coming to this country from England many others than the Roger Mowry line, and they used the Morey spelling at their arrival.

The names and authors of the four Mowry genealogies are:

The descendants of Nathaniel Mowry of Rhode Island by William A. Mowry-1878. There is a supplement to this-1900.

The descendants of John Mowry of Rhode Island. By William A. Mowry-1909

A family history of Richard Mowry of Uxbridge, Mass. By William A. Mowry-1878.

The Descendants of Augustus Mowry- 1784 to 1941. By Robert M. Mowry 1942

Roger Mowry, parents unknown, was born about 1606, died Jan. 5, 1666, married 1634 Mary Johnson-issue;
Roger d. y. .
Jonathan b. 1637
Bethia b. 1640
Elizabeth b. l643
Nathaniel b. 1644- d March 24,1718
John b- 1645
Mehitable b. 1646
Joseph b. 1647
Benjamin b. 1649
Thomas b. 1652.
Hannah b. 1656

Roger Mowry was born in England, and with Roger Williams, a possible relative, came to America, probably on the ship, Lion, which sailed prom Bristol, Eng., Dec.1,1630, and arrived in Boston, Feb.5, 1631. Both took the freeman's oath in Boston May 8, 1631. In 1634, Roger Mowry  married Mary Johnson, daughter of John Johnson and Mary of Roxbury, Mass. Roger Mowry and Roger Williams  moved about together, from Boston to Salem, where Roger Mowry joined the Church, and then to Providence, Rhode Island where Roger Mowry died. Speculation regarding his age at his death resulted in the estimate that he was not over 60. He was, therefore, born about 1606.

See Heath connection by Douglas Richardson, NEHGR #146 pages 261-278

The following is from "The Great Migration Begins" by Robert Charles Anderson
ROGER MOWRY

ORIGIN:  Unknown
MIGRATION:  1630
FIRST RESIDENCE:  Salem
REMOVES:  Lynn by 1646, Providence by 1652

OCCUPATION:  Neat herd at Salem, 1636-41 [STR 1:41, 109]; innkeeper at Providence by 1655 [RICR 1:313].  In 1657 the Rhode Island Treasurer was ordered to pay Roger "Moorie" 1s. 6d. out of the treasury "for this day's firing & house room" [PrTR 2:110].
CHURCH MEMBERSHIP:  In list of Salem church members compiled in late 1636 [SChR 5] (annotated "removed").
FREEMAN:  18 May 1631 (as "Roger Mawry") [MBCR 1:366].
EDUCATION:  He could sign his name [PrTR 1:63], and his wife made her mark [PrTR 3:213].
OFFICES:  Essex petit jury (from Salem), 25 January 1641[/2] [EQC 1:33].

Providence constable, 1655 [PrTR 2:81]; one of six men chosen to hear cases in Providence 1662 [PrTR 3:37]; in later life frequently a Providence juryman.
ESTATE:  In the Salem land grant of 1636 "Roger Morie" received 40 [or 50] acres "next to Mr. Cole" [STR 1:20; 26].  On 14 August 1637, he requested a "spot of ground by Estye's" [STR 1:54-55].  He was granted three-quarters of an acre of marsh on 25 December 1637, with a household of five [STR 1:103].

He had fifty acres laid out 20 February 1637 and on 20 July 1638 he was granted a strip of meadow of 2½ acres and 1½ acres of upland [STR 1:71].

Land was laid out in Providence to Roger Mowry in early 1656 at his request [PrTR 2:92].  On 27 August 1656 he had a house lot laid out to him upon the hill against Robert Williams's meadow [PrTR 2:97].  On 15 January 1658 he bought a house and four acres from Robert Colwell [PrTR 2:16] and sold it to Thomas Olney Sr. of Providence 19 March 1658/9 [PrTR 1:62-63].  On 7 April 1660 was granted six acres of land and three acres of meadow in exchange for land that he had been previously granted [PrTR 2:126].  On 12 June 1660 he sold ninety acres of land a mile outside of Providence to John Acres of Dorchester [PrTR 1:14-6, 3:118].  On 23 November 1660 Henry Neale of Braintree, carpenter, sold Mowry everything he had in Providence, including his house, which had been purchased from Daniel Comstock [PrTR 1:57-8]; on 3 February 1661/2 Mowry sold the right of commonage that came with this land to William Carpenter [PrTR 1:85].  On 4 May 1661 Samuel Comstock's widow, Anne Smith of Providence, sold Mowry four acres in the row of houses in the the north part of Providence, next to a parcel already owned by Mowry [PrTR 1:58-9].  Mowry sold Robert Colwell's right of commonage to William Carpenter of Pautuxett on 22 December 1662 [PrTR 1:70-76].  In the Division on the East Side of the Seven Mile Line, Roger Mowry drew lot #74 on 19 February 1665[/6] [PrTR 3:73].

On 3 June 1685 Timothy Brookes reveals that "for & in satisfaction of a certain sum of money which the said Roger Mawrey promised unto the said Eldad Kinsley in marriage with his said daughter Mehittabell for part of her portion, [Mowry] did ... give ... unto the said Eldad Kinsley a certain quantity of land containing by estimation twelve acres" [PrTR 14:129].

Although Roger Mowry had made her his executrix, the widow Mary ultimately refused administration of his insolvent estate [RICR 2:244].  She later accepted administration, but neither will nor inventory survive and were missing as early as 1677 when a review of town books which had survived King Philip's war revealed that the administration papers and bond were missing.  She may have been an ineffective administratrix, for son Jonathan claimed before a Providence town meeting that he had taken possession of twelve acres of upland that had been his father's right, being the "son & heir apparent" [PrTR 8:93].

BIRTH:  By about 1610 based on date of freemanship.
DEATH:  Providence 5 January 1666[/7] [NEHGR 52:207].
MARRIAGE:  By 1637 Mary Johnson, daughter of JOHN JOHNSON.  She married (2) Rehoboth 14 January 1673 John Kingsley [ReVR 220] and was buried at Rehoboth 6 January 1678/9 [Early Rehoboth 1:32].
CHILDREN:
i JONATHAN, bp. Salem 2 April 1637 [SChR 16]; m. (1) Plymouth 8 July 1659 Mary (Bartlett) Foster, widow of Richard Foster and daughter of ROBERT BARTLETT [PCR 8:22; TAG 32:193-96, 53:154-56]; m. (2) say 1694 Hannah (Pincen) (Young) Witherell, daughter of Thomas Pincen [TAG 32:194-95].
ii APPIA/BETHIAH, bp. Salem 17 June 1638 [SChR 16]; m. 30 September 1662 George Palmer [TAG 20:53-54].
iii MARY, bp. Salem 16 January 1639[/40] [SChR 17]; no further record.
iv ELIZABETH, bp. Salem 27 March 1642 [SChR 18]; living in 1690 when she appears in an account of payments from the estate of her brother John [Providence Probate A50]; apparently unmarried.
v NATHANIEL, b. say 1643; m. (intention) Providence 28 August 1666 Joanna Inman, daughter of Edward Inman [RIVR 2:Providence:134].
vi MEHITABLE, b. say 1644; m. (1) Providence 9 May 1662 (or shortly thereafter) Eldad Kingsley [PrTR 3:23]; m. (2) by 1685 as his second wife Timothy Brooks, son of Henry Brooks (they made a deed together on 3 June 1685 [PrTR 14:129-31]).
vii JOHN, b. say 1646 ; m. by about 1674 Mary _____ [Austin 348-49].
viii JOSEPH, b. say 1647; m. by 1672 Mary Wilbur, daughter of William Wilbur [Austin 228].
ix BENJAMIN, b. 8 May 1649 [PrTR 2:18]; bp. Salem 20 May 1649 [SChR 22]; m. say 1676 Martha (Hazard) Potter, widow of Ichabod Potter and daughter of Thomas and Martha (_____) Hazard.
x THOMAS, b. Providence 19 July 1652 [PrTR 2:18]; m. Roxbury 6 September 1673 Susanna Newell.
xi HANNAH, b. Providence 28 September 1656 [PrTR 2:18]; m. Portsmouth 3 December 1674 Benjamin Sherman [Austin 179].
ASSOCIATIONS:  Hannah Mowry and Elizabeth Mowry were members of the Salem church in the 1640s and may have been connected in some way to Roger Mowry [SChR 11].  Alternatively, their surnames may have been variants of "Moore" or "More."

COMMENTS:  In a warrant to the constable of Lynn, dated 29 December 1646, one of the witnesses was "Roger Morey" [EQC 1:107].

Mention is made of "where Rogr Morey's old house stood" in 1649 [EQC 1:175], perhaps referring to his remove from Salem to Lynn.  A flawed reading of records in the case in which Mrs. Lydia Bankes sued Mowry for debt in June of 1650 resulted in the erroneous conclusion that Lydia was the daughter of John Johnson of Roxbury [EQC 1:193].

John Clawson, a servant of Roger Williams, is said to have complained of some men, "such as Roger Mowry," according to the deposition of Edward Inman on the occasion of Clawson's violent death [PrTR 15:83-84].

Roger was administrator of the estate of William Robinson of Providence in October 1657 [PrTR 2:108].

BIBLIOGRAPHIC NOTE:  In 1992 Dean Crawford Smith and Melinde Lutz Sanborn published a comprehensive treatment of Roger Mowry and his son Nathaniel [Angell Anc 414-34].

Mary JOHNSON [Parents] [scrapbook] 1 was christened 2, 3 on 31 Jul 1614 in Ware, Hertford, England, United Kingdom. She was buried 4 on 29 Jan 1679 in Rehoboth, Bristol, Massachusetts, United States. Mary married 5, 6 Roger MOWRY about 1636 in Roxbury, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States.

Other marriages:
KINGSLEY, John

They had the following children.

  M i Jonathan MOWRY was christened on 2 Apr 1637.
  F ii Bethiah MOWRY was christened on 17 Jun 1638.
  F iii
Mary MOWRY was christened 1 on 16 Jan 1639/1640 in Salem, Essex, Massachusetts, United States.
  F iv
Elizabeth MOWRY was christened 1 on 27 Mar 1642 in Salem, Essex, Massachusetts, United States.



ELIZABETH, bp. Salem 27 March 1642 [SChR 18]; living in 1690 when she appears in an account of payments from the estate of her brother John [Providence Probate A50]; apparently unmarried.
  M v Nathaniel MOWRY was born on 10 Jan 1644. He died on 24 Mar 1718.
  F vi Mehitable MOWRY was born about 1644.
  M vii John MOWRY was born about 1646. He died about 1690.
  M viii Joseph MOWRY was born about 1647. He died on 27 May 1716.
  M ix Benjamin MOWRY was born on 8 May 1649. He died after 1719.
  M x Thomas MOWRY was born on 19 Jul 1652. He died on 25 Dec 1717.
  F xi Hannah MOWRY was born on 28 Sep 1656. She died before 1718.

Edward INMAN [scrapbook] 1, 2 was born in BET 1620 AND 1625 in of Warwick, Kent, Rhode Island, United States. He died in 1706 in Providence, Providence, Rhode Island, United States. Edward married 3 Barbara PHILLIPS before 1646 in Warwick, Kent, Rhode Island, United States.

From the records of real estate in the Town of Providence, it appears that among the earliest, if not the earliest settlers in Northern Rhode Island, were EDWARD INMAN, and JOHN MOWRY. Soon after these men had established themselves, we find STEPHEN ARNOLD and NATHANIEL MOWRY with them.
Their first settlement was on Sayles s Hill, so called in modern times. The precise time, when they came to Rhode Island, is not known. Nor is it clear whether Edward and John came together or separately. It is surmised, however, that they both came here from the Massachusetts Bay Colony, where they had probably spent some time, prior to making their permanent settlement within the limits of this State.

Barbara PHILLIPS 1, 2 was born in 1624 in England, United Kingdom. She died before 17 Aug 1706. Barbara married 3 Edward INMAN before 1646 in Warwick, Kent, Rhode Island, United States.

Married first Michael Phillips.

They had the following children.

  F i Joanna INMAN was born in 1646. She died in 1718.
  M ii John INMAN was born on 18 Jul 1648. He died on 6 Aug 1712.
  M iii Edward INMAN was born in 1654. He died on 7 Jun 1735.

Edward BULL [scrapbook] was born about 1625 in Donnington, Gloucester, England, United Kingdom. He died about 1682 in Donnington, Gloucester, England, United Kingdom. Edward married Elizabeth Castell GISBORNE about 1651/1652 in Donnington, Gloucester, England, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT OF EDWARD BULL's WILL: - April 2, 1679

Donnington, Co., Gloucester
2n April 1679

My body to be buried at discretion of my executore

I give the house wherein I now live with lands and belongings to my kinsman Anthony Gisborme of Loughborough, Co. Gloucester, yoeman. For term of years upon trust for my wife Elizabeth to have rents and profits thereof for s'd term and after to --- John Bull my eldest son to take said rents, etc. for remainder of said term.

My son John Bull in consideration of this bequest shall pay unto my 2 younger sons Isaac and Jacob the sum of £9 each and another £9 at end of 6 years after the death of my said wife.

I give the use of all my household goods with stock and cattle to my wife Elizabeth Bull during her life and after her decease I give the same to my daughter, Mary Bull.

Sole Executor, my Kinsman, Anthony Gisborne. Overseers my brother Thomas Castell and Kinsman John Gisborne

The X mark of Edward Bull and John Gisborne
Witnesses--Thomas Castell Thomas Day

Will proved at Stow-on-Wold on 25 May 1682 by Executor. Inventory £57 - 8 - 7 personal Estate

Elizabeth Castell GISBORNE was born about 1630 in Donnington, Gloucester, England, United Kingdom. Elizabeth married Edward BULL about 1651/1652 in Donnington, Gloucester, England, United Kingdom.

They had the following children.

  M i
John BULL.
  M ii Isaac BULL was born on 2 Apr 1653. He died on 5 Jan 1716.
  M iii
Jacob BULL.
  F iv
Mary BULL.

Isaac BULL [Parents] was born on 2 Apr 1653 in Donnington, Gloucester, England, United Kingdom. He was christened in Donnington, Gloucester, England, United Kingdom. He died on 5 Jan 1716 in Providence, Providence, Rhode Island, United States. Isaac married Mary WALLING on 2 Mar 1714 in of Smithfield, Providence, Rhode Island, United States.

Other marriages:
, Mary

He was a carpenter.

ISAAC BULL (The Immigrant ancestor)

Our immigrant ancestor in the colonies was Isaac Bull, son of Edward Bull of Donnington, Gloucestershire, England. (This is in contradiction to the often repeated story that our line descended from Henry Bull, first Governor of Rhode Island.)

An Indenture found in a Bible handed down to her descendants by Hannah Bull, youngest child of Isaac Bull and his chief heir, gives the most authoritative information.

It was published in the Cleveland Herald on 17 October 1874, by Andrew Phillips, on the occasion of a Phillips family reunion. (Hannah Bull had married Daniel Phillips, a Quaker) and the copy of the indenture was followed by an explanation provided by a grandson of Hannah's.....

It was after the discovery of this indenture (dated September 29, 1668), which apprenticed Isaac Bull 'sonne of Edward Bull of Donnington'.....that one of Isaac's descendants living in Brookline, Mass., began searching for Isaac Bull's people in England.

Wills were found in county Gloucester - Edward Bull's at Donnington, 1697, and that of his brother John, of Longborough, County Glousester, in 1675. From Edward's will we learn that his wife's name was Elizabeth (Castell or Gisborne?), and they had four children, of whom Isaac was the youngest....

As Isaac was indentured probably at age 14 - the usual age - he was considered to have been born in 1654. His indenture would end in 1675.

Isaac was married in England to Mary (surname unknown). Their four children, all born in England, were: John, born 1677, married Mary Closson; Elizabeth, born 1679, married John Vaughn; Mary, born 1680 (died 4th of January 1725), married Henry Mowry; Rose, born 1682, married Francis Inman.

The first knowledge we have of Isaac in the New World is in a land record in Worcester, Mass. In 1686, Isaac Bull, a carpenter, was granted land in Worester and the same year he bought four additional lots. It seems safe to say that Isaac brought his family to the New World sometime between the date his father's will was proved (1682), and the date he was granted land in Worcester (1686).

When he left Worcester is not known, but in 1696 Isaac Bull, housewright, of Newport, Rhode Island, bought 110 acres of land in the northern part of the town at Providence. In 1700 he sold all but one acre. In 1704 he bought 1/4 of an acre. In 1706, Isaac Bull, millwright, brought 10 acres probably in Scituate, R.I., (one parcel of 7 acres and one of 3 acres, adjoining his homesite in Providence.) These are all the land transactions that have been found.

Isaac married twice. Isaac's first wife, Mary, died in 1713. He was married again on 02 March 1714 in Rhode Island to Mary Walling (daughter of James Walling) who was born in 1693. He lived only two years after that, dying in 1716 and leaving an infant daughter, Hannah.

Isaac made a will only twelve days before his death, which was acted upon by the Town Council of Providence, Rhode Island, on April 17, 1716, in which he named Hannah as his heir......His widow later married Joseph Cooke in 1719, and died about 1724.

THE INDENTURE - Sept. 29, 1668

"This indenture witnesseth that ISAAC BULL, sonne of Edward Bull of Donnington, County of Gloucestershire, by and with the consent of said father has put hisselfe Apprentice to and with William Williams of STOW-ON-THE-WOLD, aforesaid carpenter, and after the manner of an apprentice, with him to tarry and dwell from the day of date unto the full end and for the full term of seven years from thence next and immediately following and ensueing fully to be complete, ended during all which term the sayd ISAAC BULL apprentice to and with the sayd WILLIAM WILLIAMS as his master well and faithfuly shall serve, his secrets shall keepe, his commandments lawful and honest everywhere shall doe; fornication in the house of said master, nor without, he shall not commit; hurt or damage to his said master he shall not doe, nor consent to be done to the value of____pds. by the years or above, but according to his power shall lett and hinder or thereof his master inform.

Taverns or Alehouses of Custom, he shall not haunt or freequent unless it be about his master's business here to be done. All dyce, cards or any other unlawful games he shall not play.

The goods of his said master Inordinately he shall not waste, nor them to anybodie lend without his master's lycense or consent. Matrimonie with any woman during or within the sayd terme he shall not contract nor espouse nor from his service neither by day or by night shall absent himself as well in words as In deeds, - and sayd William Williams unto the sayd ISAAC BULL his sayd apprentice in the craft trade, mystery or occupation of a carpenter the which he usith after the best manner that he can or may shall show, teach, instruct and inform or cause to be showed, taught, instructed and Informed as much as thereunto belongeth or in any way appertanyeth, and in due manner chastise him, finding unto his sayd servant meate, drink, washing and lodging to an apprentice of such a trade, craft, mystery or occupation.

In witness thereof the sayd master and servant of these presents, Indentures interchangeable, their hands and seals have set, the twentyninth day of September in the twentieth day of the raine of our Sovraine Lord, King Charles the Second, Anno Domine 1668

MEMORANDUM: It Is concluded and agreed that the sayd William Williams he is to give his sayd servant one X (axe) and a Squire and a handsaw, foure Nogars, a paire of chysells, a gauge and a hamer and sayd ISAAC BULL is to have at the five years end three pounds a year.

Sealed and delivered In the presence of JOHN BULL. Frances Gardiner.

"The above indenture was written on parchment In Old English and translated verbatim and literatum except two words, the meaning of which I am not certain and I have left them as in the original which reached the eighth generation back from my brother's grandchildren at our reunion."
B. F. Phillips, (Grandson of Hannah Bull)

Andrew Phillips published the above In the Cleveland Herald, October 17, 1874., on occasion of a Phillips reunion.

1700, Aug. 2.     He sold Stephen Sly 110 acres, for £35.

1713, Jun. 16     Taxed 6s.

1716, Jan. 5.     Will --- proved 1716, Apr. 17. Exx' [executor] wife Mary. To her, all estate, both real and personal, for life. To son John, 20s. To daughters Elizabeth Vaughan, Mary Mowry and Rose Inman, 20s. each. To daughter Hannah Bull, after decease of wife, all the rest of estate, but if she have no heirs, then equally to four grandchildren, viz: Isaac Bull, Isaac Vaughan, Uriah Mowry and Aaron Inman. On back side of will, the declaration of Isaac Bull was made that he was in no ways indebted to his children for any service done for him by them, and that he had made them an offer to look after him during his natural life, and then they should have his estate after him, but they had refused.

Inventory, cash £10, 15s, 8d, books £2, pewter, carpenter's tools, cordwainer's seat, spinning wheel, gun, hay, corn, oats, grindstone, 2 heifers, 2 yearlings, a swine, 9 sheep, mare, cost, &c.

1725, Jan. 18. Mary Cook, widow and executrix of Isaac Bull, having of late deceased in testate and left committed to her by form husband Isaac Bull, to her care for his child, therefore it was ordered that James Walling, father of said deceased Mary Cook, take into his possession all estate he can find left by Isaac Bull, for his child, Hannah.

Mary WALLING. Mary married Isaac BULL on 2 Mar 1714 in of Smithfield, Providence, Rhode Island, United States.

Other marriages:
COOK, Joseph


Gregory BELCHER [Parents] was born 1 in 1606 in Ashton, , England, United Kingdom. He was christened on 30 Mar 1606 in Wardend, Warwickshire, England, United Kingdom. He died 2 on 25 Nov 1674 in Braintree, Norfolk, Massachusetts, United States. Gregory married 3 Catherine in BY 1631 in England, United Kingdom.

Catherine was born about 1610 in England, United Kingdom. She died 1 in 1680 in Braintree, Norfolk, Massachusetts, United States. Catherine married 2 Gregory BELCHER in BY 1631 in England, United Kingdom.

Last name may be Allcock.

They had the following children.

  M i Josiah BELCHER was born about 1631. He died on 3 Apr 1682/1683.
  F ii Elizabeth BELCHER was born on 24 Jun 1632. She died on 17 Oct 1682.
  M iii John BELCHER was born about 1633. He died in 1693.
  M iv Moses BELCHER was born about 1635. He died on 5 Jul 1691.
  M v Samuel BELCHER was born on 24 Aug 1637. He died on 17 Jun 1679.
  F vi Mary BELCHER was born on 8 Jul 1639.
  M vii Joseph BELCHER was born on 25 Dec 1641. He died about 1678.

Edward RAINSFORD [Parents] 1 was christened 2, 3 on 10 Sep 1609 in Staverton, Northamptonshire, England, United Kingdom. He died 4 on 16 Aug 1680 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States. Edward married 5, 6 Ellizabeth DILLEE about 1633 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States.

Edward had a will 7 on 3 Aug 1680 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States. His will was probated 8 on 28 Aug 1680 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States.

Other marriages:
, Mary

The Great Migration Begins, 1620-1633
Robert Charles Anderson

EDWARD RAINSFORD

ORIGIN:  London
MIGRATION:  1630
FIRST RESIDENCE:  Boston
RETURN TRIPS:  Travelled to England and returned 1635 on the Abigail [Hotten 93]

OCCUPATION:  Fisherman.  On 14 October 1657 "Edw[ard] Rainsford" headed a list of thirteen "fishermen, humbly desiring that they may be exempted from trainings during the time of the fishing season, &c., the Court grants their request" [MBCR 4:1:312].  Merchant.  The inventory of Edward Rainsford demonstrates that he had branched out from his fishing activities.  He owned portions of several vessels, he owned a lighter, and he owned a warehouse "with privileges," presumably meaning dockside rights, indicating that he was trading with the ships that arrived in Boston harbor, and was reselling the merchandise which he obtained in this way.
CHURCH MEMBERSHIP:  "Edward Ransford" was admitted to Boston church as member #62, which would be in the winter of 1630-1 [BChR 13].  Deacon in the year 1666 and 1667 [BChR 347].  On 12 February 1668[/9] Edward Ransford and Jacob Eliot were dismissed as deacons "for setting their hands with other brethren to desire their dismission from the church because the church had chosen Mr. Davenport for their pastor" [BChR 62].  Rainsford then became ruling elder of the Third Church of Boston at its formation in May of 1669 [Worthley 63].
FREEMAN:  17 April 1637 (as "Edward Rainsfoard") [MBCR 1:373].
EDUCATION:  On 12 August 1636 Edward Ransforde and other of the richer inhabitants of Boston gave 5s. for the maintenance of the free school master [BTR 1:160].  He signed his deeds, as did his second wife Elizabeth.  His inventory included "books" valued at £5.
OFFICES:  Petit jury, 1 December 1640 [MBCR 1:312].

Committee to lay the planting ground at Long Island, 24 February 1639[/40] [BTR 1:51].  Committee to draw instructions for the selectmen, 11 March 1660/1 [BTR 2:1].  Committee to set a rate, 17 March 1661/2 [BTR 2:6].  Selectman, 1662-70, 1672 [BTR 2:6-52, 68]. Committee to study the common and wasteland, 21 April 1673 [BTR 2:75-76, 86].  Committee to draw up instructions for the Deputies of the General Court, 14 May 1677 [BTR 2:110].
ESTATE:  In the 1645 Boston Book of Possessions Edward Rainsford held one house and garden bordered by the cove on the south [BBOP 34].

On 9 April 1649 "Ed[ward] Rainsford" was one of the many men who agreed to pay 6d. an acre for their land on Long Island for the use of the school [BTR 1:95].  On 22 February 1657[/8] "Ed[ward] Rainsford" was let a piece of ground behind his garden at 2s. per year [BTR 1:142].

On 4 March 1671/2 "Edward Raynsford, fisherman," and Lt. Richard Cooke of Boston, merchant, deeded back to Peter Gee his dwelling house and lands [SLR 7:134, 9:97].

On 15 October 1674 "Elder Edward Rainsford of Boston" deeded to James Brading of Boston, ironmonger, one acre on Long Island in Massachusetts Bay called "Lug's Lot."  Elizabeth released her dower [SLR 9:301].

On 4 August 1676 Edward Rainsford and Elizabeth his wife deeded for "natural love, goodwill & affection" to "our loving sons John Raynsford, David Raynsford and Solomon Raynsford" a parcel of land and beach at the southerly end of the town [SLR 9:373].

On 15 November 1675 Elder Edward Rainsford exchanged small parcels of land with the town [BTR 2:98].

In his will, dated 3 August 1680 and proved 28 August 1680, "Edward Raynsford Senior of Boston in New England, merchant, being sick and weak of body," bequeathed to "my loving and dear wife Elizabeth Raynsford" the use of all real and personal estate during her life; "my said dear wife shall have liberty" to give away by will the full sum of £100; "my dear wife may if she see cause before her decease give some part of my estate to such of my children that shall be in necessity for their present relief, which shall be deducted out of that child or children's portion"; "I hereby forgive my daughter Mary Parcyfull the debt of £10 more or less that her husband now oweth unto me, and also I give unto my said daughter Mary Parcyfull the sum of £10 to be paid unto her in goods"; to "my grandchildren, namely Jonathan, Dorothy and Mary, all children of my son Jonathan Raynsford deceased, the sum of £50 apiece to be paid unto them" at twenty-one, but if "my said grandchildren Dorothy & Mary do not carry themselves dutifully to their grandmother and take her and their Aunt Gording's advice in disposing of themselves in marriage that then such of them that so refuseth to do shall forfeit their legacy"; to "my son Solomon Raynsford ... all the land that I formerly laid out to him for an houselot"; to "my son David Raynsford ... all that piece of land which I formerly laid out to him"; "my son Edward Raynsford shall have that house that was my son Nathan Raynsford's, with all the land that belongs to it, he paying to my executrix £350"; after "my said wife's decease the full remainder of all my real and personal estate ... shall be equally divided amongst my children hereafter named, viz., John Raynsford, David Raynsford, Solomon Raynsford, Edward Raynsford, and Ramus Belchar, Elizabeth Greenough, & Anna Hough, and that if any of my children die before my said wife then my will is that their children shall enjoy the legacy hereby bequeathed to such child or children"; "if any of my said children die before my executrix childless, then the legacy hereby bequeathed unto them shall be equally divided amongst my grandchildren, that is to say the children of the children that have been born to me by my now wife"; "my said dear wife Elizabeth Raynsford the sole executrix";  "my loving friends Mr. Edward Willis and Mr. John Hayward both of said Boston" overseers [SPR 6:330-32].

The inventory of the estate of "Elder Edward Raynsford late of Boston deceased" was taken 3 September 1680 and totalled £1638 7s. 11d., including £810 in real estate: "dwelling house, barn, with the land as enclosed," £260; "house and land late belonging to Nathan Raynsford deceased," £300; "land upon Raynsford's Island," £10; "land upon Long Island," £10; and "a warehouse with privileges bought of John Phillips," £230 [SPR 9:20-21].  The warehouse shop had fish, but it also had dry goods such as thread, gloves, buttons and cloth.  The inventory also showed that Rainsford owned much shipping: "three-sixteenth part of the ship [blank], Jeremy Cushen, commander," £150; "one-fourth of the ketch Mary, Jno. Gardner, commander," £100; "one-fourth of the ketch Swallow, Benj[ami]n Pickman, commander," £100; "one-sixteenth of ship Sarah, Tho[mas] Tuck, commander," £30; and a "lighter and canoe," £12.  The inventory showed that Rainsford also possessed "1 negro boy Nat [and] 1 negro girl Nancee," valued at £40.

In her will, dated 13 November 1688 and proved 14 February 1688/9, "Elizabeth Raynsford relict of Edward Raynsford of Boston deceased" bequeathed to "my grandchild Atherton Haugh" 40s.; to "my grandchild Nathan Raynsford, Solomon Raynsford his son," 40s.; to "my grandchild Newman Greenough" 40s.; to "my daughter Belcher the ten pounds which formerly I lent to her" and some moveables; to "my grandchild Susanna Raynsford daughter of my son John deceased" £5; to "my grandchild Edward Raynsford son of David Raynsford" a silver cup; to "my countryman Tillee" 20s.; to "my husband's daughter Mary Persevere" 40s.; residue of £140 (after legacies are paid) to "be equally divided among my own children now living and born of my body"; "my sons David Raynsford and Solomon Raynsford" to be joint executors [SPR 10:454-56].

BIRTH:  Baptized Staverton, Northamptonshire, 10 September 1609, son of Robert and Mary (Kirton) Rainsford [NEHGR 139:238, 296].  (On 29 December 1671 Edward Rainsford deposed that he was aged "about sixty years" [SPR 7:177]; at his death he was seventy-one years old [King's Chapel 37].)
DEATH:  Boston 16 August 1680 ("Here lies the body of Mr. Edward Raynsford Senior, aged 71 years, departed this life Anno Domini 1682 [sic]" [King's Chapel 37]; 16 August 1680: "Elder Edward Rainsford died, being old and full of days" [Hull 247]; from the Hobart Journal we learn that on 17 August 1680 "Mr. Ransford ruling elder to the Third Church in Boston [was] buried" [NEHGR 121:206]).
MARRIAGE:  (1) _____ _____.  "Wife of Edward Rainsford died" Boston June 1632 (no doubt as a result of the birth of her twins) [BVR 1].

(2) By 1633 Elizabeth _____.  On 15 December 1633 "Elizabeth Ransford the wife of our brother Edward Ransford" was admitted to Boston church" [BChR 17]; she died at Boston on 16 November 1688 (16 November 1688: "Mrs. Rainsford, the aged Mother, dies" [Sewall 184]; "Here lyeth buried the body of Elizabeth Raynsford aged 81 years deceased the 16 day of November 1688" [King's Chapel 38]).

ASSOCIATIONS:  In his will Edward Rainsford mentions that his grandchildren Dorothy and Mary Rainsford, daughters of his son Jonathan Rainsford, should mind their "Aunt Gording"; in her will Edward Rainsford's widow makes a bequest to "my countryman Tillee." Neither of these persons has been identified.

COMMENTS:  On 8 February 1635[/6] Owen Roe wrote from London to Governor John Winthrop asking him to "help forward that Mr. Ransford may be accommodated with lands for a farm to keep my cattle, that so my stock may be preserved" [WP 3:226].  In January 1637[/8] "Edward Raynsford" at Boston made out a bill of exchange to "his loving master Mr. Owen Roe at the sign of the Three Golden Keys in Cheape Syde" [WP 4:6].

"Edw[ar]d Rainsfoard" was one of the Wheelwright supporters ordered disarmed, 20 November 1637 [MBCR 1:211].  On about 22 November 1637 he acknowledged his error in signing the petition in favor of Wheelwright [WP 3:514].

John Tey bequeathed £2 to "Mr. Raynsford" and 10s. to John, Mr. Rainsford's man [Suffolk Wills 3].  Christovell Gallop named him overseer of her will 24 July 1655 [Suffolk Wills 60].  Thomas Snow of Boston called Edward Rainsford and other men his "beloved brethren" and asked them to be overseers of his will 10 November 1668 [Suffolk Wills 342].

BIBLIOGRAPHIC NOTE:  In 1985 James A. Rasmussen carefully presented the correct English ancestry of Edward Rainsford, followed by accounts of the immigrant and his sons [NEHGR 139:225-38, 296-315].

In 2000 Douglas Richardson proposed for this immigrant a line of descent from Henry III [NEHGR 154:219-26].


NEHGR Vol. 161:260
THE LONDON APPRENTICESHIP OF EDWARD¹ RAINSFORD OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS

Leslie Mahier

The English ancestry of Edward¹ Rainsford of Boston is known from a letter written in England by John Hull, a member of the Third Church in Boston, dated March 1676, which mentions "Judge Rainsford, brother to him of Boston." The parish registers of Staverton, Northamptonshire, show that Judge Richard Rainsford did indeed have a brother named Edward of the appropriate age baptized there. Based upon this, James A. Rasmussen presented several genera­tions of Edward's ancestors, most of whom were gentry families.W More recently, Douglas Richardson presented evidence for Rainsford's apparent descent from King Henry III [²]

A note in the Winthrop Papers dated January 1 637[/8] mentions Edward's "loving master Mr. Owen Roe at the sign of the Three Golden Keys in Cheape Syde" in London.131 While reviewing records of the Haberdashers Company of London, I came across Edward Rainsford's apprenticeship to Owen Rowe in June 1626:[4]

Edrus Raynsford fihius Robti Raynsford de Staverton in Corn Northton Armiger poss Owen Rowe civi et habersd London pro termino octo Annor a festo Penticosti ult dat ix die

Besides confirming Edward's parentage, this record also explains his emigra­tion to New England. Owen Rowe was a Puritan interested in the colonization of Massachusetts. He never emigrated, though he owned a house in Mount Wollaston, and wrote letters to John Winthrop. He served in the Parliamentary forces in the English Civil War. He signed the death warrant for King Charles I, for which he was later convicted, and he died in prison in 1661.[5]


Leslie Mahler, FASG, is a resident of San Jose, Calif, who has written many articles ident~'ing the English ancestry of American colonists. He may be contacted at lmahler@att.net.

¹James A. Rasmussen, "Edward Raynsford of Boston: English Ancestry and American Descendants," Register 139 (1985):225-38, 296-315. The letter by John Hull is cited at 226.
²Douglas Richardson, "Plantagenet Ancestry of Edward1 Rainsford (1609-1680) of Boston," Register 154 (2000):219-26.
³Robert Charles Anderson, The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England, 1620- 1633, 3 vols. (Boston: NEHGS, 1995), 3:1547, citing Winthrop Papers, 1498-1654, 6 vols., (Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 1929-92), 4:6.
4Apprenticeship Register for the Haberdashers Company of London [FHL 1,551,159].
5Oxford Dictionary of National Biography,
60 vols. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004), 47:1003-04 (reference pointed out by John Brandon of Columbia, South Carolina). See also "Absentee Landlords," Great Migration Newsletter 15:2 (2006):9-1 0, 16.

Ellizabeth DILLEE was born about 1616. She died 1 on 16 Nov 1688 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States. Ellizabeth married 2, 3 Edward RAINSFORD about 1633 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States.

Ellizabeth had a will 4 on 13 Nov 1688 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States.

WILL: Suffolk Probate, file 1689, Vol. 10:454

They had the following children.

  M i John RAINSFORD was born on 30 Jun 1634. He died in 1688.
  M ii Jonathan RAINSFORD was born in Oct 1636.
  F iii Urania RAINSFORD was born on 4 Jun 1638. She died on 2 Oct 1691.
  M iv Nathan RAINSFORD was born in Jul 1641.
  M v David RAINSFORD was born in Aug 1644. He died in 1691.
  M vi Solomon RAINSFORD was born in Oct 1646.
  F vii Elizabeth RAINSFORD was born in Feb 1648/1649. She died on 25 May 1688.
  F viii
Hannah RAINSFORD was born in Jan 1650/1651 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States.

Hannah was baptized 1 on 12 Jan 1650/1651 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States.
  F ix Ann RAINSFORD was born on 1 Feb 1651/1652.
  M x Edward RAINSFORD was born in Sep 1654.

William HOPKINS was born about 1588 in Yeovilton, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. William married Joane ARNOLD in England, United Kingdom.

of Yeovilton

Joane ARNOLD [Parents] was christened 1, 2 on 30 Nov 1577. Joane married William HOPKINS in England, United Kingdom.

They had the following children.

  F i Frances HOPKINS was born on 28 May 1614. She died on 26 Feb 1700.

Thomas ARNOLD [Parents] [scrapbook] 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 was born on 18 Apr 1599 in Ilchester, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. He was christened on 18 Apr 1599 in Ilchester, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. He died 6 in Sep 1674 in Providence, Providence, Rhode Island, United States. Thomas married 7, 8, 9 Phebe PARKHURST about 1636 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

Thomas was a member 10 of Quaker about 1637 in Providence, Providence, Rhode Island, United States.

Believed to be the half brother of William Arnold.

Thomas, came in the Plain Joan In May, 1635, ae. 30 [?]. Watertown, propr. 1636. frm. May 13, 1640. Presented by jury con­cerning baptism (8) 1651. [Mdx. Files.] He m. Phebe dau. of George Parkhurst, Sen.; they sold 30 (1) 1655 to her bro. George P. of Wat. land bought of her father G. P. and his wife Susanna 20 Dec. 1648. Ch. Ichabod b. 1 (1) 1640, Richard b. 22 (1) 1642, John b. 19 (12) 1647, Eleazor b. 17 (4) 1651. Rem. to Providence, R. I.; sold Wat. property In 1661.

The Arnold Family of Smithfield
It can be truly claimed that the family of Arnold is not only a historic family in New England but world wide historic as well so as European influence has extended the history of the human races.

Henry II of England, called the great " Lawgiver," took a great interest in genealogy. Ethelred of Rievaux, the great authority of the age, dedicated his great work, "Genealogic Regum," to the king. He traced his pedi­gree back to Adam without referring to his Angevin father or Norman grandfather. This pedigree line in an­other form is one of the rich manuscript treasures of the crown of England today. Without venturing to dispute or prove its authenticity to Adam the line can be well proven back to one of the so called "Twelve Imrnortals" which name I think the poet Virgil gives to the twelve patrician families of Rome. This one was known as Arno. What is still singular, the name has remained from that far back period in history until now without change save in the terminal letters. During the age of heraldry for deeds done the public service I have seen drawings of more than 200 arms. To one versed in the reading of these emblems a history of the family could be written.

A branch of the family became settled on the border of Wales and England where it built up a strong follow­ing. From here, Abergaveny, came two of the family to New England. It will thus be seen that so far as family history goes no New England one can point to a more aristocratic origin.

William and his younger and half-brother left Ports­mouth May i and arrived at Boston June 24 in the year 1635. He had the forethought to take the date of birth and baptism of his father's family. The first addition to this paper was the date of the emigration; the next was this item: " Memorandum-We came to Providence to dwell April 20, 1636."

This is the earliest date where the word Providence can be found. The first official using of the word is at the head of the Report of the Arbitrators, 27 of 5 mo., 1640.

That William Arnold and his brother Thomas were the wealthiest men of the Colony goes without saying. Thomas owned at the time of his death in September, 1674, near 10,000 acres of land. His brother William and two sons Benedict and Stephen could own nearly as much. They paid the heaviest tax in the Colony.

William Arnold has been very much misunderstood. Williams has given him a bad name. Mr. Williams was like our modern Teddy in some ways in giving character­istics to those who did not agree with him. In order to settle the general belief that Arnold was a bad man I in­tend to publish his letters to Massachusetts and the deeds he recorded there. Mr. Williams' letters have been pub­lished. It is now no more than right that the other should be also.

Thomas Arnold does not appear to have aroused~ Mr. Williams' ire so much as did his brother William or his nephew Benedict. Perhaps this was because Thomas would not quarrel with him. His son Richard appears to have been a man of influence as he was a member of Coy. Andros' Executive Council which made him prac­tically acting Governor of the State for three years.

Phebe PARKHURST [Parents] [scrapbook] 1 was born on 29 Nov 1612 in Ipswich, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom. She was christened 2, 3 on 29 Nov 1612 in StMarys, Parish, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom. She died after 1688 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. Phebe married 4, 5, 6 Thomas ARNOLD about 1636 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

Other marriages:
DAN, Daniel

They had the following children.

  F i Susanna ARNOLD was born about 1636.
  M ii
Ichabod ARNOLD was born 1, 2 on 1 Mar 1640/1641 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.
  M iii Richard ARNOLD was born on 22 Mar 1642. He died on 22 Apr 1710.
  M iv
Thomas ARNOLD 1.
  F v Elizabeth ARNOLD was born in 1645. She died in 1745.
  M vi John ARNOLD was born on 19 Feb 1647/1648. He died on 5 Jan 1722.
  M vii Eleazer ARNOLD was born on 17 Jun 1651. He died on 29 Aug 1722.

Richard ARNOLD [Parents] [scrapbook] 1, 2, 3, 4 was born on 22 Mar 1642 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. He died 5 on 22 Apr 1710 in Providence, Providence, Rhode Island, United States. Richard married Sarah after 1695 in Providence, Providence, Rhode Island, United States.

Other marriages:
ANGELL, Mary

Per Avery Angell's book, Richard Arnold owned allegiance in 1670; was named in the royal commission of Council to Sir Edmund Andros, 1687 and died April 22, 1710.

History of Woonsocket
by E. Richardson
Woonsocket: S. S. Foss, Printer, Patriot Building, Main Street, 1876.

---------------------------------------------------------------------- ----------

p. 39 - 41.
HISTORY. CHAPTER III.

THE FIRST SETTLERS OF WOONSOCKET.

When the first settlement of Woonsocket was made, I have been unable to ascertain.  The reader will remember that I alluded to a saw-mill which existed in these parts in 1666.  As its builder, Richard Arnold, was at that time but twenty-four years of age, it is fair to infer that it was erected about that time, and that then was 'the beginning'.  The first settlers, as I have said before, were Richard Arnold and Samuel Comstock - the latter 'pitching his tent' a little west of the Union Village, and the former locating himself at the river.  During their lives they held the lands in common, and no lines were drawn between their estates until many years after their death. This was done by their heirs, March 26, 1731.

When this act was consummated, the Arnold family became proprietors of a greater portion of the lands in the vicinity of the 'Falls', and which is now the most valuable part of the town.  It therefore devolves upon me to devote a brief space to Richard Arnold, from whom the titles to our estates are derived.

Richard Arnold was a man of superior abilities, and honored with the respect and confidence of his fellow-townsmen.  During the greater portion of his life he held official positions, being either a member of the General Assembly or Assistant-Governor of the Colony.  And when our Colony was reduced to a single county, under the Administration of Sir Edmond Andros, a seat was given him in his Council, at Boston. Not only did he take an active part in the affairs of government, but he was repeatedly chosen to act with committees in the adjustment of boundary disputes with the neighboring colonies, and to settle differences that arose, from time to time, among his fellow-townsmen. It was probably during some of his official excursions to the northern part of the Colony that he was moved by the beauty and fertility of the region, and selected it as a fitting place for a settlement.  And, taking the up-stream-without-limit clause in the deed from the Indians to mean something, as one of the proprietors of Providence he proceeded to make improvements upon the territory without going through with the formality of purchasing it over again.

According to an ancient document which I have seen, Richard Arnold was married to an 'angel woman'.  The contemplation of the fruits of this union, miraculous not only in numbers but often in conception, I am led to believe that the spelling of the word 'angel' with a small 'a' was intentional.  He died April 22, 1710, aged sixty-eight years, leaving a widow (Sarah) and four children, namely - Richard, John, Thomas and Mary.  The following document will show the extent of his estate and the manner of its division:

The Will of Richard Arnold.

'I, Richard Arnold, of Providence, in the Collony of Rhode Island, etc., being aged and something infirm of body, but sound and perfect memory, thanks be to God; but considering the uncertainty of this life, and not knowing how soon it may please God to take me out of this world, I am willing to do something for the setling of that small estate I have to dispose of; and do therefore make and appoynt this my last will and testament as followeth:

'And, first, I give to Sarah, my wife, for the terme of her natural life, my two lots in the town, with the orchard and house upon them, and also my meadow at the West River, which I bought of Edward Manton, and after my said wife's decease to ----, the lots and said meadow unto my three sons - Richard, John and Thomas Arnold - their heirs and assigns forever. 'I also give to my wife two cows and one-third part of my household goods her in the towne, and all the estate that was hers before I married her.

'Item:  I give to my aforesaid son, Richard Arnold, all the land within his fence where he now dwelleth at Wansocket, on ye east side ye Little River, to be for him, his heirs or assigns for ever.

'Item. I give to my son, John Arnold, all the land within his fence and where he now dwelleth, with my interest and part of ye saw-mills at ye Falls, as also ------ of meadow ------more, being within fence on ye east side of ye Little River, with the piece of meadow called the Island, joining on ye west side ye Little River, bounded on ye west with the ditch and on ye south with the drain, to be to the ye said John Arnold, his heirs or assigns forever; and all the rest of lands adjoining, belonging to me at Woonsocket, with my farme granted by ye towne, lieing on ye west side ye branch of Pawtucket river, I give to my said two sons, Richard and John Arnold, to be equally divided between them and theirs forever.

'Item.  I give to my son, Thomas Arnold, all my land adjoining at the place where he now dwelleth, or that leith on both sides the highway that leads fro the towne to Loquasqussuck, with the house and other buildings on said farme.  That part of said farme lieing on the north-east side said highway is bounded on ye south-west with said highway, on ye norwest, part with the land belonging to Edward Smith and his brother, and partly with land laid out to William Whipple, and on ye north bounded with the land of John Dexter, and on the south-east with Eliezer Arnold; and that on the south-west side of said highway, bounded on the south-east with the land belonging to John Angell and partly with common or undivided land, neere unto land laid out formerly to ----- Olney.  The said land I give to my said son, Thomas Arnold, his heirs and assigns forever, he paying the several sums as followeth, that is:  To pay fifteen pounds, in money, to his brother Richard, and ten pounds to his brother John, and twenty-five pounds to his sister, Mary Steere.

'Item.  I give to Thomas Steere that piece of land belonging to me which lieth at ye bent of ye river below ye bridge, near Thomas Steere, his meadow.  And my will is that Thomas Steere shall have half the mills at Nassatuckett, and the other half of said mills, with the farme now in the hands of Elisha Smith - the effects of said mill and farme to be to my executors hereafter named.  And my right in common or undivided lands, with all other lands belonging to me not before specified, I give to be equally divided to my said executors.

'And my will is that Toby, my negro servant, serve with my son Thomas until he comes to the age of twenty-five years, which will be in February, 1716 or 1717, and that my said son to then set him free, and give him two suits of apparill, a good narrow axe, a broad hoe, and one sithe with tackling, fit for mowing, and twenty shillings in money.

'And I do make my three sons - Richard, John and Thomas Arnold - joynt executors of this my last will and testament.  In witness hereof, I hereunto set my hand and seal this eight day of June, 1708.
RICHARD ARNOLD.

Sarah 1. Sarah married Richard ARNOLD after 1695 in Providence, Providence, Rhode Island, United States.

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