Ancestors of Tim Farr and The Descendants of Stephen Farr


Thomas ANGELL [scrapbook] 1 was born 2 before 1619 in England, United Kingdom. He died on 24 Dec 1694/1695 in Providence, Providence, Rhode Island, United States. Thomas married 3 Alice ASHTON in BY 1642 in St Albans, Hertfordshire, England, United Kingdom.

Re: Thomas Angell (1618) Antecedents
Posted by: George Maynard
Date: May 03, 1999 at 13:40:06
In Reply to: Thomas Angell (1618) Antecedents by Waynne Warren of 409

I suggest that you refer to "The Ancestry of Emily Jane Angell 1844-1910" by Dean Crawford Smith, edited by Melinde Lutz Sanborn (Boston, New England Historic Genealogical Society 1992), p.1, in which the author concludes that, based on simple chronology,Thomas the Immigrant could not descend from the Angells of Peakirk. She states; "The process of elimination now shows that Thomas Angell of Rhode Island cannot be part of that family" and his parentage and origin "remain unknown."

I certainly hope that she is wrong and you are right.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL SETTLERS OF PROVIDENCE, R.I.

THOMAS ANGELL

When Roger Williams sailed from Bristol, England on the ship Lyon, he took his young kinsman Thomas Angell, a lad of twelve, as an indentured servant, a common practise in those days. They arrived at Boston in February 1631. In the next few years they dwelt briefly in Boston, Salem and Plymouth. When Williams was banished from Massachusetts, it was young Angell, a husky youth of eighteen, noted for his great size and physical stamina, who accompanied him through the wilderness in that bleak January of 1636, guiding him though forest and swamp, tending him in his illness and sharing his perils and privations. Even at that early age, he displayed the strength of character and bold independence which marked his entire life.

Angell's aggressiveness soon brought him to public attention in the new settlement at Providence. Although handicapped by lack of education, his physical and moral qualities were such that he rose to positions of great importance. In 1652 he was elected one of the commissioners to make laws for the colony and three years later became Constable of Providence and a prime figure in the celebrated Chasemore Case. Richard Chasemore of Patuxet was charged with a foul crime and residents demanded that Williams, as President of the colony, arrest him. While Williams claimed jurisdiction over Patuxet, so too did Governor Endicott of Massachusetts. The two were even then negotiating to settle this matter. Not wishing to offend Endicott, Williams requested him to arrest Chasemore. After much irresolution, Endicott agreed to send a sheriff and aide to make the arrest. Nicholas Fenner, a Justice of the Peace, and others, enraged at Williams' complacency, directed Angell, as Constable, to seize the interloping sheriff. With one aide to help him, Angell nabbed the sheriff, the aide and Chasemore, and bundled them all off to jail. The sheriff, released almost at once, returned to Boston and Chasemore was bailed to appear before the Court at Newport, Rhode Island. From this curious imbroglio the status of Rhode Island as a sovereign commonwealth was established.

In 1655 Angell was made a Freeman of the Town of Providence. That year he shared in the Division of Lands, drawing the lot just north of where the First Baptist Church now stands. The lane bordering it is now Thomas Street and its extension over the hill, Angell Street. In 1658 the former illiterate boy was chosen Town Clerk, which position he held for seventeen years. After King Phillip's War, he was one of the five who decided the fate of the Indian captives.

An important event in his life took place after the Restoration of King Charles II. Charles had sworn to track down the Regicides who killed his father. Knowing these men were sheltered in the colonies, the authorities deemed it wise that the leading men of each colony should take an Oath of Allegiance to the King. Angell was one of the twelve selected from Rhode Island. He defied the King and refused to take the Oath. Three others agreed with him, but eight signed. After much negotiation, the Oath was reframed, the language modified,and the four signed.

In 1685 Thomas Angell made a will dividing his property between his eight children, after providing for his wife, Alice (Ashton). In 1694 he died. It is to be hoped that his numerous descendants will look back with pride to one who for so many years was a sturdy bulwark of Providence Plantations and who helped establish our great nation Condensed from an article by Edward Wild Bradford

THE CHILDREN OF THOMAS AND ALICE (ASHTON) ANGELL

Alice Ashton was the daughter of James and Alice Ashton of St. Albans, Hertfordshire, England. She came to New England with her brother James, an early settler of Providence, and here she married Thomas Angell. She dies December 24, 1694.

Source:Published by the Thomas Angell Family Association in Commemoration of the 325th Anniversary of the Founding of Providence, Rhode Island, 1636-1961 Source: Published by the Thomas Angell Family Association in Commemoration of the 325th Anniversary of the Founding of Providence, Rhode Island, 1636-1961

Thomas Angell was born England before 1619 and likely much earlier since he calls himself "very Aged" in his 1685 will. He died in Providence, RI between August 1688 (Providence estate tax) and 18 September 1694 when his will was proved. He married possibly at Providence before 1642, Alice Ashton. He came from London as servant or apprentice of Roger Williams, as one tradition has it, but another tradition says, of Richard Waterman.

On 27 July 1640 Angell was one of the thirty-nine signers of an agreement for a government. He took his status as an inhabitant and Freeman of Providence very seriously and was politically active until the last decade of his life. He was one of the twelve signers of the Providence Oath of Allegiance, making his curious circular mark. A forceful and opinionated man, he held many town offices, despite being illiterate (or at least unable to write). He was a member of the Town Council in 1650 and was also surveyor and commissioner that year. He was one of the six jurymen in 1650, 1652 and 1659.

In December of 1652, Angell filled an important position as one of the six Providence commissioners at the General Assembly at Hugh Bewitt's trial for high treason. Bewitt had been found guilty by the Court of Trials and he appealed to the Court of Commissioners, and Angell and the five other commissioners acquitted him, sparing Bewitt the dreadful punishment reserved for traitors. Angell was frequently associated with matters of defense, upholding of the law, and other physical matters.

On 25 3mo 1653, he was ordered a commissioner to meet with the Warwick commissioners regarding Captain Underhill and Mr. Dyer and the manner and means of making war upon the Dutch. Due to the merchant trade up and down the coast, there were several inter-marriages between Dutch and Providence colonists. This did not prevent the Council of State from directing the people to annoy the Dutch and forbidding them to send provisions. In one of the most aggressive responses from a New England colony, Rhode Island voted cannon and small arms and twenty volunteers be sent to the English on Long Island.

Thomas Angell acted as constable for the town of Providence in the precedent-setting case of Richard Chasmore, in which Rhode Island's sovereignty over its citizens versus the authority of the Massachusetts Bay Colony was tested. The men of Rhode Island took exception to the Massachusetts Bay Colony authorities assuming that they had jurisdiction on Rhode Island land. They further resented the implication that Roger Williams was the only man in Rhode Island with any power. By standing strong and silent in this altercation, Thomas Angell and his four deputies withstood the implied challenges of the Massachusetts Bay Colony.

Roger Williams brought a presentment against Thomas Harris, William Wickenden and Thomas Angell on 13 March 1656/7, charging them as ringleaders in the new division in the colony. Harris was charged with treason as a result of his view of liberty, which differed from those of Williams but the charge was dropped. The three men appeared in court and three times an appeal was made for the prosecutor to come forward, but Williams did not come and no other appears to take his place, so the men were dismissed. The divisiveness in question was a matter of teachings on the nature of liberty, Angell apparently being a strong adherent of Harris' rather than an originator of the concepts involved.

Thomas Angell was a juror on the inquest upon the body of Margaret Goodwin 4 3mo 1651 [sic, more likely 1657] when the jury made the curious assessment that, "the terribleness of the crack of thunder on the second of the third month, 165[], or the coldness of the night, being she was naked did kill her."

Robert West filed a complaint against Thomas Angell on 27 August 1646 for having trapped and attacked some of West's swine with a pitchfork after they had entered Angell's property in July. Thomas killed a sow and "bruisd as black as a shoe" some of the pigs. Angell was ordered to pay damages for the dead sow and for the value of her skin, which had been torn by the pitchfork.

At the beginning of King Philip's War, the neutrality of Providence was respected by the Wampanoags, close friends to Roger Williams from the beginning of his settlement. The harm came when colonists from these two towns joined the United Colonies army as it marched through, violating the town's neutrality. The Narragansetts were wintered in a swamp of four or five acres in the area now known as South Kingston. The results of the "Great Swamp Fight" were a small number of colonists killed and well over one thousand Narragansetts and Wampanoags killed, hundreds by burning to death in their wigwams, and countless more starved when their provisions for the winter were burned in the battle. On 26 Mar 1676, a small force of colonists was attacked by the Narragansetts on the Massachusetts side. Outnumbered, the surviving colonials escaped, bringing news to Providence. Three days later, Providence was attacked, evidently the Narragansetts' first violation of the town's neutrality. Though Roger Williams pleaded for peace, the Narragansetts set fire to the town. Shortly after the burning of Providence, Canonchet, who had led the Narragansetts, was captured and taken to Stonington where he was shot and shortly thereafter, King Philip was killed and the war ended.

At the annual town meeting 5 June 1676, five Providence men were chosen to settle the question of what to do with the surviving Indians. As one of these five, Thomas Angell made his mark to the decision that they should be placed in servitude for a number of years, according to their present ages. Other colonies were not so generous, either killing their vanquished enemies or selling them to permanent slavery in distant lands.

Thomas Angell dropped out of public service in the 1680's, though he appeared on the regular tax lists from 1680 through 1684. That the inventories of both Thomas and Alice Angell were taken the same day, coupled with the fact that Thomas paid no taxes after 1688, suggests that Thomas died about 1689 and that the family waited until Alice died in December of 1694 before probating their estates.

His will was written 23 May 1685, at least three years before his death. At a Meeting of the Council, 18 Sep. 1694: "This Day the last will & Testatment of Thomas Angell (deceased) beareing date ye 23 May 1685, hath been Examined; the which was some time since Exhibited; James Angell the Exsecutor made Oath unto ye same Tho: Olney Nathaniell Waterman & Ep: Olney as witnesses made oath to the sd will; The said will is this day approved."

Here followeth the Record of the last will & Testamt of Thomas Angell of Providence, deceased:

Be it knowne unto all People by these presents That I Thomas Angell of Providence in the Colloney of Rhoad Island & Providence Plantations in New England being now very Aged & not knoweing how soone it may please God to Remove me out of this world, and least any discontent or discord should arise after my departure conserning what Estate I shall leave behind; & being desireous that what I do leave may be Enjoyed according as my mind is it should be, Do now whilst I am in some measure of strength and whilst I am of sound & Perfect memory, make ordaine & appoynt this to be my last will & Testament:

first I do make voyd & null all & Every other will by me made at any tie formerly either by word or writeing & this will & Testament only to stand in force.

Item, I do give & bequeath unto my son John Angell my sixty acres of land lieing within the Towneshipp of Providence aforesaid in my Right of the first devision, And also my sixty acres of land in the fifty acre of second devision adjoyneing to the same, & lieing & being neare the palce Caled Cauncaunjawatchuck to be unto him, his Heirs & Assignes forever. As also the one halfe of my Right of Commoning within the said Providence Towneshipp so farr west as the seven mile line, that is to say for Commoning or feeding of Cattell cutting of Timber or forewood or any use wch Commoning is Considered in, saveing onely makeing Claime to any devision of land thereby; that shall not be; As also together with the said halfe Righ[t] of Comon, the one halfe of my Right of lands & Commoning I do give & bequeath which lieth on the west side of the seven mile line, unto my said son John Angell to be unto him his Heirs & Assign for[e]ver together with all & every their Appurtenances.

Item, I Do give & bequeath unto my son James Angell my dwelling house which standeth in the aforesaid Providence Towne next unto the streete, and my house lott or home share of land whereon the said house standeth, together with my other house lott or home share of land to it adjoyneing, as also all my meaddowes, & my Twenty acres of land lieing on Wayboysett side of the water neere the Cove Called Hawkins his Cove; And my six acres of land lieing in that Tract of land Called the neck where the Cove or salt Creeke called Bailies Cove lieth neere unto the said six acres of Land; As also my Tenn acres of land, lieing in the valley bordering upon the Northerne side of the River Called Wanasquatuckett, And not farr from Thomas Olney of Providence aforesaid his orchard & meaddowes lieing upon the said River; And also halfe my Right of Comoning within the Plantation of Providence aforesd so farr West as the seven mile line, with all the lands which are yet devideable, or may yet, or hereafter be devided or laid out on the East side of the seven mile line unto a whole Purchase Right of Common: As also the one halfe of all my lands & Common within the Towneshipp of Providence aforesaid lieing on the west side of the seven mile line: All which said lands meaddowes & common, with my aforesd dwelling house together with my Barne, & all other my houseing (the house which I now dwell in only Excepted) to be unto my said son James Angell, to him his Heirs & Assignes forever, together with all & every their Appurtenances. Item, I Do give & bequeath unto my son James Angell my dwelling house which standeth in the aforesaid Providence Towne next unto the streete, and my house lott or home share of land whereon the said house standeth, together with my other house lott or home, share of land to it adjoyneing, as also all my meaddowes, & my Twenty acres of land lieing on Wayboysett side of the water neere the Cove Called Hawkins his Cove; And my six acres of land lieing in that Tract of land Called the neck where the Cove or salt Creeke called Bailies Cove lieth neere unto the said six acres of Land; As also my Tenn acres of land, lieing in the valley bordering upon the Northerne side of the River Called Wanasquatuckett, And not farr from Thomas Olney of Providence aforesaid his orchard & meaddowes lieing upon the said River; And also halfe my Right of Comoning within the Plantation of Providence aforesd so farr West as the seven mile line, with al the lands which are yet devideable, or may yet, or hereafter be devided or laid out on the East side of the seven mile line unto a whole Purchase Right of Common: As also the one halfe of all my lands & Common within the Towneshipp of Providence aforesaid lieing on the west side of the seven mile line: All which said lands meaddowes & common, with my aforesd dwelling house together with my Barne, & all other my houseing (the house which I now dwell in only Excepted) to be unto my said son James Angell, to him his Heirs & Assignes forever, together with all & every their Appurtenances.

Item, I do give & bequeath unto my daughter Anphillis Smith & unto my daughter Mary Arnold, & unto my daugher Deborah sabeere, & unto my daughter Alice whipple, & unto my daughter Margery whipple unto Each of them two shillings in silver Money to be paid unto them by my Executor hereafter & Executrix hereafter Named:

Item, I do give & bequeath unto my loveing wife Alice Angell my now dwelling house wherein I now dwell to be unto her for her use duiring the time of her Widdowhood; and in Case shee Marrey not, then for the sd house to be unto her duiring the terme of her naturall life with a small plot of land adjoyneing to the said house for a little Garden; As also before the said house Conveniency of yard Room As also free Egresse & Regress for her to pass & repass as shee may have Ocation through any of the afore devised lands: But i Case my said wife do Marrey then at the day of her marriage shall the said house & small Plot of land come into the hands of my said son James Angell with ye Privelidges aforesaid to be unto him his Heirs & Assignes forever, but in case she marrey not, then shall the said house & sd small Plot of land with the said Privelidges Come into the hands of my said son James Angell after the decease of his mother to be unto him & his Heirs & Assignes forver; And that my sd son James angell shall keepe the said house in such Repare as may be Comfortable for his said mother to dwell in duiring the time of her makeing use thereof as aforesaid. I do also give unto my wife one milch Cow to be her owne, & that the said Cow shall be by my sd two sons (viz) John Angell & James Angell constantly, both summered & wintered for the use of my said wife, & when the said Cow by Reason of Age or other thing which may make her unfit for milke doth faile, then shall my said son James take that said Cow himselfe & put another in its Roome, & so in Case any Causalty befalls at any time what cow is so for my sd wife her use as afore Exprest then shall my said son James still put another Milch Cow in its Roome; the which sd Cow shall be at my sd wife her dispose, Either if shee marrey or at her death; And that my said two sons John Angell & James Angell their Heirs Executors Administrators & Assignes shall yearly pay unto my said wife (their mother) sixteene shillings in money untill shee marrey, & in case shee marrey not, then duiring the terme of her naturall life; the which said sixteen shillings shall yearely be the one halfe paid by my said son John & the other halfe by my said son James. And that my said two sons John Angell & James Angell their Heirs, Executors, Administrators & Assignes shall take Care & shall provide for the Comfortable maintenance of my said wife duiring the terme of her [Widdowhood, & if she marrey not, then duiring the terme of her] naturall life; And that such Care shall by them be taken & such Provision by them be made that my said wife may sufficiently, suteably & Comfortably be kept & maintained both in health & in sickness with sutable tendance & all other nessesareys as her Condition shall Constantly Require; the which Charge shall be Equally borne by my said two sons: But in Case my sd two sons shall neglect or faile, or Either of them their Heirs Executors Administrators or Assignes shall Neglect or faile of the performance thereof, then shall a third part of the defective party their lands afore devised be unto my said wife for her use & Profitt during the terme of her widdowhood, if shee marrey not, then during the terme of her naturall life: The which Third part of the said lands shall be the third part of ye same which may be most Advantageous to my said wife. I do also give & bequeath unto my said wife all my household goods to be her owne & at her owne dispose; That is to say all my Bedds bedding, Cloathing both woollen linnen, & all sorts of vessells both Iron, Brass, Pewter, wood & all other things to the house belonging which are Nessesary for house keepeing which may be Counted household goods: Table linnen as well as other is includedl; as also if any moneyes be left at my decease, the same I do give unto my said wife.

Item, I do give & bequeath unto my son James Angell all my Cattell of all sorts only Excepting one Cow which I have before disposed of to my wife; As also unto my said son James Angell I do give all my Tooles of what sort soever & all other my Estate both Moveable goods and Chattells not before disposed of: And unto my said son James I do give to him his Heirs & Assignes forever all other my lands Rights Interests & Titles whatsoever not before disposed of. And I do make ordaine Constitute & appoynt my loveing wife Alice Angell my lawfull Executrix & my son James Angell my lawfull Executor, both Joyntly, unto whome I do give all my debts unto me from any Person due, & they to pay all debts from me to any person due; & to see that my body be decently buried & to Execute & performe this my will according [to] My true meaneing & intent therein, And I do desire and appoynt my loveing friends & neighbours Nathaniell Waterman & Thomas Olney to be the overseers of this my Will. In witness of the Premises I do hereunto set my hand & Seale the Twenty & third day of may in theyeare one Thousand six hundred Eighty & five.

The marke of X Thomas Angell.

Signed & Sealed in the presence of us Thomas Olney, Nathaniell Waterman, Epenetus Olney.

Be it knowne unto all People by these presents that I the aforesd Thomas Angell do Add this as a Coddicill to my aforesaid will: That is, I do also give & bequeath unto my said son John Angell, unto him his Heirs & Assignes for ever my Ten acres of land which was unto me laid out in luie of my Right of my share of Meaddow in the second or fifty acre devision, it lieing & Adjoyneing to my afore specified lands neere Cauncaunjawatchuck; The which sd Ten acres of land was forgotten before whe the other lands was disposed of: In witness whereof I do hereunto set my hand the Twenty & third day of May in the yeare one Thousand six hundred Eighty & five.

The marke of X Thomas Angell.

Signed in the presene of us, Thomas Olney, Nathaniel Waterman, Epenetus Olney.

James Angell Executor to the abovsd will appeared this day before the Towne Councill of Providence being the 18th day of September 1694 & made oath unto the said will: Thomas Olney: Nathaniel Waterman & Epenetus Olney, the 18th of September 1694 appeared before the Towne Councill of Providene & attested upon Engagement unto the abovesd will as Witnesses.

The 18th of September 1694 the Towne council of Providence have Examined & do approve the aofresd will: Attests Joseph Jencks Assistant Steven Arnold Assistant, Joseph Williams Assistant. Recorded August ye 15th 1711 P Tho: Olney Clerk.

Herefolloweth a Record of ye Inventory of the Estate of ye deceased Thomas Angell of Providence. The Inventory of the Estate of ye deceased Thomas Angell, Taken & made the 21 of January 1694/5 as followeth:

A great Coate
2 Cotten shirts
1 Dowlas shirt
1 old much worne Flannill shirt
A west coat & a P of Breeches
a P of Drawers & 2 old Coates
1 Hatt, old & out of fashion
P of Old stockins
2 yardes of homespun Raw Cloath
1 more old Cloathes little worth
3 old Bolsters, not fethers, & 2 pillowes & an old straw bed
A very old flock bedd much worne & light a fether bed & boslter
A Fether bed & boulster
An old Boulster & 3 old Pillowes
1 P of Cotten & linnen sheets, & one P of all linnen sheetes
4 P of Two sheetes
1 shirt, old
1 P of fine Pillow bears
5 Pillow beers
5 Napkins
4 Towells & a small Table cloath
2 Pillow beeres
1 P of Blancketts
1 Rugg called a smooth Rugg
1 Coverlidd
1 P of Old Blanketts
1 olde worne out Rugg
3 old linnen Cloths that things were wrapt in
3 old Blanketts
2 Basens & a Pewter Platter
2 Chamber Potts
1 leakey 2 pint Potts old & 1 halfe pint pot
2 old Pewte small dishes 2 Poringers 2 spoones
An old small Bason & Porringers, sausers & 2 old spoons
2 old Bell mettle Possnetts, a Brass Candle stick
a Brass Morat & Pestle
An old Brass Chafeing dish & a Brass skillet no frame, worne out & pacht
4 Indian woodden dishes, 2 Trayes & a boule
1 old Turned boule, a dish, a platter & a skim dish
3 old brass Kittells, little better then old Brass
1 old lanthorne & a kallebash bottle
1 old Runlett
1 old Earthern Pott a Pann & small dish
1 small Iron Pott & small old Iron Kettle
1 Frying Pann
1 Tramill & an eetch hooke, an old Grid Iron, a P of pot hookes, a P of Thongs, a slice handle, & a spitt & P
of bellowes
6 Glass Pint bottells
4 long neckt Glass bottels
3 Old spoones
An old Lookeing Glass
2 Pokett handkercheifs 3 Neckcloaths
2 Callico Neckcloaths
7 linnen Capps
1 Pillow beere
3 beddsteds
3 chests & a box & another box with drawers
1000 of Pinns
5 chaires
Old Tubbs & such lumber
1 old draught chaine
In money 5 pounds
A Table
A Joint forme
A settle

The sum Totall, Error Excepted, amounts to 43 pounds, 13s., 4d. This abovesd Inventory is a true & just apprisall of ye Estate of sd Thomas Angell of what was brought to our view: Taken & made the day & yeare abovesd by us Nathaniell Waterman, Tho: Olney: The 12t of Februarey 1694/5, James Angell Executor to ye last will of ye deceased Tho: Angell hath made Oath to the trueth of sd Inventary above written, & also Tho: Olney & nathll: waterman. Recorded August ye 20th 1711: P Tho: Olney Clerk.

References:

The Ancestry of Emily Jane Angell 1844-1910, Dean Crawford Smith, New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, MA, 1992, pp. 107 & 121 - 125.

The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Pub. Co., Baltimore, MD, 1969, (previously pub. 1887), p. 4.

Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England, James Savage, Genealogical Publ. Co., Baltimore, MD, 1990 (rev.), p. 57, Vol. 1.

Alice ASHTON [Parents] 1 was christened 2 on 1 Feb 1617/1618 in St Albans, Hertfordshire, England, United Kingdom. She died 3 on 24 Dec 1694 in Providence, Providence, Rhode Island, United States. Alice married 4 Thomas ANGELL in BY 1642 in St Albans, Hertfordshire, England, United Kingdom.

Alice, baptized St. Albans Abbey Parish Register, Film # 0991390, 1 Feb 1617/18; died Providence, RI 24 Dec 1694; married probably Providence bef 1642 Thomas Angell. Here Followeth the Record of the last will & Testament of Alice Angell of Providence (deceased).

Be it knowne unto all People by these presents That I Alice Angell of the Towne of Providence in the Narraganset Bay in New England (widdow) being now very weake of Body but (through mercy) of sound & Perfect memory do make this to be my last will & Testament. I do give & bequeath unto my foure daughters (viz) Anphillis Smith, deborah Sabeer, Alice Whipple and Margery Whipple all my weareing Apparreill both Woollen & linnen Equally to be devided amongst them, & more over to my Daughter Deborah Sabeer I give one Chamber Pott & two wooden Trayes which formerly belonged to my son Hope, & also I give unto my daughter Alice Whipple one Trunke & a Deske which my mother gave to me;

Item I do give & bequeath to my son James Angell five Pounds in money.

Item, All the Remainder of my goods not before disposed of I do give unto my Two sons (to witt) John Angell & James Angell Equally to be betweene them two devided; And I do make ordaine & appoynt my son James Angell to be my Executor who shall see that my Body be decently buried and performe this my will according to my true Meaneing & intent therein, In witness whereof I do hereunto set my hand & seale the one & Twentyeth day of October Anno: One Thousand six hundred ninty & foure.

And farther my will is, that Each of my foure daughters aforesd shall have so much of my Pewter as may be for a Remembrance of me. memorandum the three lines & the piece of line blotted out was allowed of by ye Testator, it being something mistaken by the scribe & should not have been there.

The marke of X Alice Angell.

Signed & Sealed in the presence of Tho. Olney, Nathaniell Waterman, Epenetus Olney.

James Angell Executor to the Will on the other side of this Paper Written: & Tho. Olney & Nathaniell Waterman & Epenetus Olney witnesses to the said will, have the 15th day of Januarey 1694/5 given Engagement unto the sd Will. The sd will hath the 15th of Januarey 1694/5 been Examined by the Towne Councill of Providence. Attests Tho. Olney Towne Clarke. Recorded Auguest ye 18th 1711 p Tho. Olney Clerk.

Herefolloweth ye Record of the Inventory of the Estate of ye deceased Alice Angell of Providence. The Inventary of the Estate of ye deceased Alice Angell: Taken & made January ye 21: 1694/5.

weareing Apparrill
7 white linnen square Neckcloathes
2 blue neckcloathes
3 Capps
8 Capps & Cofes, white linnen
6 head dressings & four Cross Cloathes
4 P of Gloves & a Poket handkercherf
Other small weareing linnen old & worne
2 blue Aprons, 1 Greene apron, & one homespun one
2 wast Coats
3 Petty Coates
a fine shift & 2 old ones
sevrall other coats, i P of bodyeases & other Apparrill old & much worne
1 P of new stockins & other stokins & shooes
5 Pounds in Money
A Trunke & a Deske
3 Old bolsters, not fethers, 2 pillowes, & an old straw bed
A very old flock bedd much Worne & light
A Fether bed & bolster
A Fether bed & bolster
An old boster & 3 old Pillowes
4 P of Tow sheets
1 P of fine Pillow beers
5 Pillow beers
5 Napkins
4 Towells & a small Table Cloath
2 Pillow beers
1 P of Blancketts
1 P dutch Blancketts
1 Rugg Called a smooth Rugg
1 Coverlidd
1 P of old Blancketts
1 old worne out Rugg
3 old linnen Cloathes that things were wrapt in
3 old Blanketts
2 basens & a Pewter Platter
2 Chamber potts
1 leakey quart pot, 2 pint pots old, & 1 halfe pint pott
2 old Pewter small dishes, 2 Poringers, 2 spoones
An old small bason & Porringers a saucer & 2 old spoons
2 small old Bell Mettle posnetts, a brass Candlestick a brass morter &
Pestle
An old brass Chafeing dish & a brass skillet, no frame worne out & Patcht
4 Indian woodden dishes, 2 Trayes & a boul
1 old Turned boul, a dish, a platter & a skim dish
1 old Runlet
1 old Earthern pot, a Pann & small dish
3 old brass Kittles, little better than old brass
1 small Iron Pott & small old Iron Kittle
1 Frying Pann
1 old warming pan
1 Tramill, an Eech hooke, an old Grid Iron, a P of Pott hookes, a P of
Tongs, a slice handle & a spitt & P of bellows
6 Glass pint bottles
4 long necked bottles of glass
3 old sppones
An old lookeing Glass
1 Pillo beers
3 bed steds
5 Chests, a box, & antoher box with drawers
1000 of Pinns
5 Chaires
Old Tubbs & such Lumber
A Table
A Joynt forme
A settle

The sum Totall, Errors Excepted, amounts to 46 pounds, 5s., 2d. The abovesd Inventary is a just appriseall of ye Estate of sd Alice Angell; of what was brought to our vew, Taken & Made ye day & yeare abovesd by us Tho: Olney, Nathaniell Waterman. The 12t day of ffebruary 1694/5 James Angell the Executor of the deceased Alice Angell hath made oath to the truth of ye Inventary above written; And also Tho: Olney & Nathaniell Waterman.
Recorded August ye 21: 1711 P Tho: Olney Clerk.

References:

The Ancestry of Emily Jane Angell 1844-1910, Dean Crawford Smith, New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, MA, 1992, pp. 107 & 121 - 125.

The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Pub. Co., Baltimore, MD, 1969, (previously pub. 1887), p. 4.

Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England, James Savage, Genealogical Publ. Co., Baltimore, MD, 1990 (rev.), p. 57, Vol. 1.

Marriage Notes:

MARRIAGE: Torrey's conflicts w/mar. place?

They had the following children.

  F i Amphillus ANGELL was born about 1644. She died after 1694.
  M ii John ANGELL was born about 1646.
  F iii Mary ANGELL was born in 1648. She died after 23 May 1685.
  F iv Deborah ANGELL was born about 1648. She died after 21 Oct 1694.
  F v Alice ANGELL was born in 1649. She died on 13 Aug 1743.
  M vi James ANGELL was born about 1650. He died on 3 Mar 1710/1711.
  M vii
Hope ANGELL was born 1 about 1650 in Providence, Providence, Rhode Island, United States. He died 2 before 23 May 1685 in Providence, Providence, Rhode Island, United States.

HOPE, born Providence, RI probably 1650s; died before 23 May 1685, when he is not named in his father's will (ERP VII:77-83) and called deceased in his mother's will (ERP VII:77-83); unmarried.
  F viii Margaret ANGELL was born about 1660. She died after 1 Mar 1702/1703.

Edward HUGGINS was born about 1639 in of Laxfield, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom. He was buried on 3 Oct 1696 in Laxfield, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom. Edward married Elizabeth IVES on 20 Sep 1664 in Laxfield, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom.

Elizabeth IVES was born about 1643 in of Laxfield, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom. She was buried on 6 Mar 1710/1711 in Laxfield, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom. Elizabeth married Edward HUGGINS on 20 Sep 1664 in Laxfield, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom.

They had the following children.

  M i Edward HUGGINS was christened on 19 Oct 1671. He was buried on 28 Apr 1728.

Nicholas TUE [Parents] [scrapbook] 1 was christened on 4 Feb 1550 in Eydon, Northamtonshire, England, United Kingdom. He died on 5 Jan 1601/1602 in Eydon, Northamtonshire, England, United Kingdom. Nicholas married Alice PIMES.

Nicholas had a will 2 on 4 Jan 1601/1602 in Eydon, Northamtonshire, England, United Kingdom. His will was probated on 27 Mar 1602 in Peterborough, Northampton, England, United Kingdom.

Will pr 27 Mar 1602, Peterborough, Northampton, England. Will of Nicholas Tue - Northampton, Series I, Bk W, p.282, # 711. Will of Nicholas Tue II, Northampton Series II, Bk P , p.199. Parish Reg Eydon, Northampton, England 1538-1660.

Alice PIMES 1 was born about 1559 in Eydon, Northamtonshire, England, United Kingdom. She was buried on 24 Feb 1621/1622 in Eydon, Northamtonshire, England, United Kingdom. Alice married Nicholas TUE.

They had the following children.

  M i
Robert TUE 1 was born 2 before 1581 in Eydon, Northamtonshire, England, United Kingdom.
  M ii Henry TEW was born about 1581. He died after 1640.
  M iii
William TUE 1 was born 2 about 1585 in Eydon, Northamtonshire, England, United Kingdom.
  M iv
Nicholas TUE 1 was born 2 about 1586 in Eydon, Northamtonshire, England, United Kingdom. He died after 21 May 1628.

Nicholas had a will 3 on 21 May 1628 in Eydon, Northamtonshire, England, United Kingdom.
  F v
Margery TUE 1 was born about 1588 in Eydon, Northamtonshire, England, United Kingdom.
  M vi
John TUE 1 was christened 2 in 1590 in Eydon, Northamtonshire, England, United Kingdom.
  M vii
Thomas TUE 1 was christened 2 in 1592 in Eydon, Northamtonshire, England, United Kingdom.
  F viii
Elizabeth TUE 1 was christened 2 in 1594 in Eydon, Northamtonshire, England, United Kingdom.
  F ix
Mary TUE 1 was christened 2 in 1599 in Eydon, Northamtonshire, England, United Kingdom.

Henry TEW [Parents] [scrapbook] 1 was born 2 about 1581 in Eydon, Northamtonshire, England, United Kingdom. He died after 1640 in Maidford, Northamtonshire, England, United Kingdom. Henry married 3 Dorothy BAREFOOT on 17 Jun 1613 in Eydon, Northamtonshire, England, United Kingdom.

Other marriages:
, Ellen

Henry Tew, father of Richard Tew, of Newport, R. I. lived at Maidford, Northampton Co., England, and it was there Richard Tew married Mary Clarke. as the following instrument, recorded in Rhode Island, in Book I. Land Evidences, Sec v of State Office, shows "this indenture, made the ??th day of Oct. in the 9th year of the reign of our Sovereign Lord, Charles of England and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, etc. Between Henry Tew, of Maidford, County of Northampton, Eng., Yeoman, and William Clarke, of Prior Hardwick, Co. of Warwick, Eng., Yoeman witnesseth : That for and in consideration of a marriage by the grace of God, shortly to be had and solemnized between Richard Tew, son and heir apparent of said Henry and Mary Clarke. one of the daughters of said William Clarke, etc., etc." Then follows an engagement entered into by Henry Texv, to make ox-er on his part. to his son Richard, houses, barns, tenements. etc.


The Origins of the TEW Name and Family.
Source: http://www2.prestel.co.uk/orton/family/tews.html

The name TEW is of great antiquity and its roots go back to Anglo-Saxon times. According to Professor Ekwell it probably appeared as an Old English word TIEWE which is known to have existed as an element in compound words [e.g. manigtiewe = skilful]. He deduces that TIEWE may have meant a lengthy object, and to have been adopted as the name given to a ridge of land in North West Oxfordshire. In time the name would have been transferred from the feature of the landscape itself to the settlements that became established upon it, and which today are the villages of Great Tew, Little Tew and Duns Tew.

I have a theory that the surname Tew is connected with the Anglo-Saxon god Tiw. This whole area needs some research, and unfortunately relatively little is known about the Anglo-Saxon gods. I do know that he was represented by the runic character, which was traditionally carved on weapons to ensure victory. What I do know about Tiw can be seen on my page to the Anglo-Saxon gods.

According to Charles Whynne-Hammond in Tracing the History of Place-Names, under the entry for Great Tew in Oxfordshire, he says: This name was just Tiwan or Teowe during the 11th Century. It has various possible origins. Either it comes from tig meaning a meeting place; or from teohh meaning 'race' or 'troop'; or from taewe meaning 'good health' or 'excellent'; or finally from tiew meaning a 'row' or 'ridge'. Each is possible: the village was a moot centre for tribes, is situated on fertile soil and is close to a long narrow hillock. In the 12th Century documents recorded Tiwa Magna and Parva Tiwe (now Great and Little Tew) together with Dunnestywa (now Duns Tew) which was owned by a person called Dunn.

However, on page 68 of the same book, when talking about the names of the pagan gods, he says that some of these gods can be found also in our place-names: Tiw occurs in 'Tewin'.... Could Great Tew not have the same derivation? To be continued...

By the end of the Anglo-Saxon period the place name appeared in a will of 1004 as TIWAN, while in Domesday [1086] the villages are recorded as both TEOWE and TEWE. In a pipe roll of 1130 we find TIW and TIWE, and in another of 1156 there is a TIWA MAGNA [Great Tew]. In a curia regis roll of 1207 there appears PARVA TIWE [Little Tew], then in the Calendar of Charters and Rolls at the Bodleian c.1200 there is DONESTIVA, while in an episcopal roll of 1232 DUNNESTYWA [both Duns Tew].

It was in the two centuries after the Norman Conquest that secondary names came into use, eventually to be inherited as family names. We might expect, therefore, that a family living in or near the villages to take TEW as their family name some time in these two centuries. Fortunately for us a record of such a family exists and is noted in the Victoria County History for Oxfordshire.

During the reign of Henry I [1100-1135] a Joibert de Tiw held lands in Duns Tew and Adderbury. He probably died without sons as he was succeeded by his brother Hugh who is mentioned in 1130 and 1142. These lands passed to Hugh's son Walter who was holding them in 1166, while in 1170 both he and his nephew Henry of Tew occupied lands at Hempton. The Adderbury lands passed to Walter's son Hugh who was dead by 1204 and so to another son Walter known to be living in 1218. The next in line was this Walter's eldest son, another Hugh, whose main claim to fame is that in 1248 he was pardoned for the murder of Laurence, Archdeacon of York: he was still alive in 1253. It was probably Hugh's brother who was the Walter appointed bailiff of the manor of Bloxham Beauchamp in 1236. Hugh was succeeded in Adderbury by his son, yet another Hugh, who, when he died in 1284, was succeeded by three married daughters between whom the manor was divided.

It is unlikely, therefore, that the "senior" line died out with the last Hugh who seems to have left daughters only, but "junior" lines almost certainly would have continued, from younger but unrecorded sons of earlier holders of the manor and perhaps from Henry of Hempton and Walter of Bloxham.

Details of individuals are very sparse during the next two and a half centuries, but a Ralph Tewe, a city merchant, was one of two representatives for Coventry summoned to Parliament in 1302. A similar name occurs in the same period as the East Window of Dorchester Abbey, Oxfordshire, contains 14th C. glass in which appears the figure of Canon Ralph de Tew. In the 15th C. Lincoln College, Oxford, was founded in 1427 by Richard Fleming, Bishop of Lincoln. Various plots of land were purchased for this purpose including a 'messuage called Deep Hall' belonging to the Hospital of St John the Baptist [later Magdalen College] which was sold by the master, Richard Tew, to Fleming's agents on 20th June 1430. Around the same time a W--- Tewe is recorded as holding land at Neithrop, near Banbury, in 1441, and it is also recorded that part of the holding had previously been in the ownership of his grandfather.

It will be seen that members of the Tew family were still in close proximity to the point of origin some 150 years after the breaking up of the manor, and it is reasonable to assume that they were descendants of the first family. It is known that the W. Tew (perhaps another Walter?) of Neithrop occupied lands that had been held by his unnamed grandfather, and this latter
could well have been the great grandson of the last but one Hugh of Adderbury or of Walter of Bloxham, as well as the father of the Richard master of the Hospital of St. John. It is also a possibility that the W. Tew of Neithrop in 1441 was the father of a Henry Tew who died in Daventry in 1488.

The descent of the family in the 14th and early 15th centuries can, at this stage, only be a matter of conjecture, but obviouslythe family was expanding and moving from the point of origin. One branch, at least, had moved into Northamptonshire by the end of the 15th C. for a John Tew is recorded as being the incumbent of the parish of Collingtree, just south of the town of Northampton, during the reign of Henry VI (1422-71), and while on 14th August 1488 HENRY TEW of Daventry made his will mentioning his wife Elizabeth and daughter Agnes. JOHN TEW also of Daventry made his will on 9th July 1501 mentioning his wife Elizabeth and unnamed children. The relationship between the two Johns and between Henry and John of Daventry is a matter of speculation, but the latter were probably father and son. It is also a matter of speculation whether there is a direct connection between these two and the family shortly to become established some seven miles away in Eydon, but again it was possibly John's son who settled there.

The first known individual in Eydon, and the first from whom a descent can be traced with any degree of certainty is RICHARD TEW. His will is dated 27th February 1521/2 and mentions his wife who is not named and four sons, John the elder, John the younger, Nicholas and Thomas. A witness to the will is Thomas Tew the elder, probably Richard's brother. As one of the sons was an executor and another was to receive 'a quartern of land....he paying the rent...', they were likely to have been at least twenty years of age, which puts Richard's marriage at 1490 at the latest, and his birth date at c.1460.

It seems that Richard was a man of some substance for besides making a bequest to the 'mother church' of Lincoln, he made three separate bequests to the church in Eydon, as well as to the poor of the village: 'To every household in Eydon that hath no plough nor part of one a strike [a level measure] of corn'.

By: Alan Tew, 43 Chanctonbury Way, Woodside Park, London N12 7AA. Telephone 0181 445 5692.

Dorothy BAREFOOT. Dorothy married 1 Henry TEW on 17 Jun 1613 in Eydon, Northamtonshire, England, United Kingdom.

They had the following children.

  M i
William TEW was born 1 in 1619 in Eydon, Northamtonshire, England, United Kingdom.
  F ii
Elizabeth TEW was christened 1 in 1619 in Eydon, Northamtonshire, England, United Kingdom.

Elizabeth had a will 2 in 1678 in Maidford, Northamtonshire, England, United Kingdom.

Thomas MOWRY [Parents] was born on 26 Mar 1578 in Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England, United Kingdom. He was christened on 26 Mar 1578 in Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England, United Kingdom. Thomas married Elizabeth.


Extracted

Elizabeth was born about 1590 in England, United Kingdom. Elizabeth married Thomas MOWRY.

They had the following children.

  M i Roger MOWRY was born about 1612. He died on 5 Jan 1666.

John JOHNSON [Parents] [scrapbook] was born in BET 1580 AND 1590 in England, United Kingdom. He died 1 on 30 Sep 1659 in Roxbury, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States. He was buried in Oct 1659. John married 2, 3, 4 Mary HEATH on 21 Sep 1613 in Ware, Hertford, England, United Kingdom.

Other marriages:
SCUDDER, Margery
FAWER, Grace

Extracted marriage date (to Margery)

4026. John Johnson425, born 1590 in Kent, England; died September 30, 1659 in Roxbury, Massachusetts. He married 4027. Mary Heath September 21, 1613 in Ware, Hertfordshire, England.

4027. Mary Heath, born in Ware, Hertfordshire, England. She was the daughter of
8054. William Heath and
8055. Unknown.


JOHN JOHNSON'S name was made famous one morning in February, 1645, at Roxbury, Mass., by the seventeen barrels of powder stored in his house blowing it to atoms. He was the "surveyor-general of all ye armyes," and, when Ann Hutchinson was taken into custody because of her religious opinions, the General Court ordered that the arms and ammunition of all her Roxbury adherents should be delivered into the custody of John Johnson. This was in 1637, and Governor Winthrop has described what followed: "John Johnson, having built a fair house in the midst of the town, with divers barns and other out-buildings, it fell on fire (February 6, 1645) in the day-time (no man knowing by what occasion), and there being in it seventeen barrels of the country's powder and many arms, all was suddenly burnt and blown up to the value of 400 or 500. Wherein a special providence of God appeared, for he being from home, the people came together to help and many were in the house, no man thinking of the powder till one of the company put them in mind of it whereupon they all withdrew and soon after the powder took fire and blew up all about it and shook the houses in Boston and Cambridge so as men thought it had been an earthquake and carried great pieces of timber a good way off and some rags and such light things beyond Boston meeting house."

John Johnson came to America in the "Arabella," in 1630, with Governor Winthrop's party, from Groton, Suffolk County, England. He settled at Roxbury, where he was soon appointed constable, and in 1631 was admitted freeman. In 1639, having paid ten shillings to the company, he was "freed from training." In 1640 he was "freed from training without any pay," because of his other services. He kept a tavern on Roxbury street, where many public meetings were held, and was a very industrious and faithful man in his place." He represented Roxbury in the General Court fourteen years, and was a member of the church when it was first organized. He died September 29, 1659, at Roxbury. His wife was Margery ((???)). His homestead was on the southwest corner of Washington and Ball streets, Boston, then Roxbury

The following was taken from the "Johnson Family History"  (Prepared by Clarence J. Webster of The Times editorial staff.) JSMB book area 929.273 A1 8599

            The Johnsons came to this country during the wave of immigration from England
        to the Massachusetts colonies in the 1620s. Charles I came to the throne in 1625.
        autocratic, dominating and imbued with the traditional Stuart belief in the divine
        right of kings, he placed in the statue books law after law which was severe and
        oppressive

             Charles enacted without a vote of parliament of law requiring a new royal
        grant which would raise taxes throughout the country sharply. In Lincolnshire
        in eastern England's agricultural section the cry of protest was especially
        sharp. Here lived such well to do families as the Dudleys, the Winthrops, the
        Harrises. Here lived too Isaac Johnson, one of the wealthiest men in all Eng-
        land, who a short time before had married Lady Arbella Tyne, daughter of the
        Earl of Lincoln. And on a section of Isaac Johnson's expansive estate lived
        and worked the youthful John Johnson with his fast growing family. John Johnson
        was a distant relative of Isaac Johnson (the existing records do not indicate
        the exact relationship).

            These Lincolnshire families were deeply aroused. Men met quietly at the
        home of John Winthrop and Thomas Dudley and discussed their future course. To
        continue to live in an England where an autocratic ruler could exact steadily
        increasing tribute seemed unbearable. Talk arose of a journey to America.  Al-
        ready word had come of men and women who were making their way in this new land
        despite the many hardships.. By the spring of 1626 the decision was made. A
        ship, the "James", was purchased and made ready. Some 200 persons were to make
        the trip. or The Arbella (formerly Eagle), The Talbot(f), The Ambrose, The Jewel left
        from Southhampton  3/29/1630 + 7 other vessels later

        JOHN JOHNSON
             John Johnson was 26 years of age when he came to america in 1626. With
        him was his wife, Margery, and his two sons, Isaac, who was seven, and Humphrey,
        who was four. There were three daughters also in the family but they remained
        in England. The trip on the "James" took .better than two months and it was mid
        summer before the now colonists sighted the Massachusetts coast, On the "James"
        with John Johnson and his family were the leaders of the new colony, John Winthrop
        and Thomas Dudley. Isaac Johnson, the wealthy land owner, made the trip and it
        was he without question who influenced John Johnson to attempt the journey.
        These men, workers of the soil and representatives of England‘s rising middle
        class, came to America principally because they saw their property and future
        threatened by a dominating king, The question of religious freedom which sent
        so many of their fellow colonists to Massachusetts both before and after this
        time was not apparently a paramount issue with them.

             Upon arrival in America there was a difference of opinion as to the best
        place to build the colony. The result of this dispute was the development of
        two settlements, one at Charlestown and the other at Roxbury. John Winthrop,
        Thomas Dudley, Thomas Harris, John Johnson and about ho others chose Roxbury.
        Their choice was wise. Roxbury had a spring where fresh water was available
        while the drinking supply at Charleston was far from good. Moreover Roxbury
        built on one of the hills which now forms a part of the city of Boston was far
        easier to protect. In following years the death of scores of Charleston resi-
        dents from disease and from Indian attacks proved the wisdom of these settlers
        of Roxbury.

             John Johnson, ambitious and energetic, set to work at once to clear land
        for a farm. Records show that he grew corn and potatoes on his farm and raised
        pigs and goats. The goats probably furnished milk for his family. In October,
        1630 he applied for admission as a freeman in the colony and in May of the fol-
        lowing year he was accepted. To become a freeman, a candidate must own land and
        must be a member in good standing in the Congregational church. All freemen in
        the colony could vote and participate in the affairs of the colony. During these
        years the colony was growing and by 1635 Roxbury was as large as Charlestown,
        Plymouth and the other Massachusetts settlements.

            John Johnson during these years was recognized as one of the strong and able
        members of the colony. He was young, but these Massachusetts colonies were filled
        with youth. John Winthrop, the governor, was only 40. In l634 John Johnson was
        named a Roxbury representative to the general court of the colony. This was an
        honor which he held for over 20 years. In the early 1633s, too, he became an
        important member of the artillery company of the colony. Service in the army
        was imperative of every man for danger from Indian attack was great even in
        this early year.

            In 1638 John Johnson rose to the important post of surveyor general of
        arms and ammunition. This office gave him full charge of the colony's store
        of army and ammunition. It necessitated the building of a larger home for his
        family and the barrels of powder and the hundred or so muskets were kept in the
        upper floor of the house. The story is told that in 1644 John Johnson's house
        caught fire under mysterious circumstances, The family escaped before the pow-
        der exploded totally destroying the home. Contemporary accounts of the happening
        say that the cause was never determined but that the best observation was that
        colonial officials had not paid for the powder fully. It was the custom of the
        day for every colonist to contribute to the store of powder to be used in defense
        of the settlement. The assumption is that John Johnson whose duty it was to col-
        lect the ammunition and keep it in his house had not been careful enough to see
        that all of the colonists had received in exchange for the powder a share of
        grain or food from the colony's stores.

            The years passed and the Massachusetts settlements grew larger until there
        were about 2,000 persons residing in the various towns. Immigration slowed up,
        however, in the 1640s and 1650s because various oppressive civil and reJigious
        decrees were repealed.

            On June 9, 1655 John Johnson's wife, Margery, died. Not long after he
        married Grace Tawer, the widow of Barbabas Tawer who had been a neighbor.

            John Johnson died on September 30, 1659 at the age of 59 years.
            Histories and accounts of his day call him a man of "undaunted spirit".

            He was apparently a man of large physical build because his strength and his
            fighting prowess are noted.


The following is from Robert Anderson's "The Great Migration Begins: immigrants To New England 1620-1633":

JOHN JOHNSON

ORIGIN:  Ware, Hertfordshire
MIGRATION:  1630
FIRST RESIDENCE:  Roxbury

OCCUPATION:  Quartermaster.  On 8 September 1642 John Johnson was assigned the duty of distributing the gunpowder to the major towns in the colony "taking into serious consideration the present danger of each plantation by the desperate plots & conspiracies of the heathen" [MBCR 2:26].  On 7 March 1643/4 Richard Davenport, Captain of the Fort of the Massachusetts at Castle Island, was instructed to demand at any time from John Johnson, surveyor general, for every soldier one sufficient musket, sword, rest and pair of bandilers with two fathom of match for each musket [MBCR 2:65].  He signed a report of the committee concerning the rebuilding of the castle and batteries on Castle Island, 20 July 1652 [MA Arch 67:102].
CHURCH MEMBERSHIP:  "John Johnson" was #9 on Eliot's list among the first comers to the Roxbury Church, without comment [RChR 74].
FREEMAN:  Requested 19 October 1630 and admitted 18 May 1631 [MBCR 1:80, 366].
EDUCATION:  His inventory included "two Bibles, one psalm book and eight books more, £1 5s.," but he made his mark to his will.
OFFICES:  Deputy for Roxbury to General Court, 1634-57 [MBCR 1:117, 135, 145, 164, 173, 178, 185, 192, 194, 204, 220, 227, 235, 319, 2:22, 55, 145, 186, 238, 265, 3:9, 39, 44, 62, 105, 121, 147, 183, 220, 259, 297, 422].  Committee to view ground and set bounds for Charlestown and Newton, 7 November 1632 [MBCR 1:101].  Committee to put a cart bridge over Muddy River, 6 August 1633 [MBCR 1:107].  Committee to purchase lands for the Indians "to live in an orderly way amongst us", 4 November 1646 [MBCR 2:166].  Arbiter in Saltonstall vs. Watertown, 27 October 1647 [MBCR 2:201].  Paymaster for the building of Boston prison, 17 October 1649 [MBCR 2:282, 288].  Committee to properly supply ministers, 6 May 1657 [MBCR 3:423-24].  Committee to settle impotent aged persons or vagrants, 14 May 1645 [MBCR 3:15], and numerous other committee appointments.
Coroner's jury, 28 September 1630 [MBCR 1:77].  Roxbury constable, 19 October 1630 [MBCR 1:79].

Admitted to Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company, 1638 [HAHAC 1:66-67].  Surveyor General of Arms and Ammunition, 8 September 1642 [MBCR 2:26, 3:147].  Committee to review colony defenses, 26 May 1647 [MBCR 2:197, 228].
ESTATE:  On 1 April 1634 he paid 20s. toward the building of the seafort [MBCR 1:113].

In the earliest list of Roxbury inhabitants, about 1642, John Johnson's valuation of £15 12s. and £6 8s., with six goats and four kids, was one of the highest in the town [RBOP 4-5].

In the Roxbury land inventory in the early 1650s John Johnson held thirteen parcels, six of which had been granted to him by the town: "his house, barn and house lot on the back side of his orchard, together with liberty to enclose the swamp and brook," eight acres; three acres of marsh; twenty acres of mowing ground; ten acres of woodland; four acres by Rocky Swamp; one hundred and ten acres and one quarter in the last division, first and third allotments; fifty-one and a half acres in the thousand acres near Dedham, bought of Edward Porter and John Pettit; six acres bought of James Morgan; sixteen acres and a half bought of Richard Goad; an acre and a quarter lately the land of Thomas Lamb; three acres of woodland lately the land of John Stebbins; four acres of fresh meadow "lately bought of John Parepoynt"; and thirteen acres and twenty rods of land, wood and pasture bought of Thomas Gardner [RBOP 16-17].

He took in a servant, Samuel Hefford, for three years on 1 December 1640 [MBCR 1:311].  He deposed 7 September 1642 that he had sold three acres of meadow to John Sams [SLR 1:37].

John Johnson was granted £40 "for his service done the country diverse years past" on 14 May 1645 [MBCR 2:99, 103].  On 7 October 1646 he petitioned with others for the land formerly granted them between Dedham, Watertown and Sudbury; Johnson was to receive four hundred and thirty-six acres [MBCR 2:163, 184].  On 18 October 1648, John Johnson and others were to receive lands formerly granted between Andover and Redding "in the place whereabouts the bridge should be built" [MBCR 2:256].  He sold one hundred acres to Richard Parker, 24 May 1650 [MA Arch 45:17].  On 22 June 1652, John Johnson received land in Roxbury from Thomas and Dorothy Hawley [MA Arch 67:102].

In May 1656, John Johnson and Eleazer Fawer were instructed by the General Court to divide the estate of Barnabus Fawer equally so that Johnson's third wife, Grace (Negus) Fawer, and her son Eleazer Fawer received half each [MBCR 3:402].

On 6 May 1657, "Mr. John Johnson having been long serviceable to the country in the place of surveyor general, for which he hath never had any satisfaction, which this Court considering of, think meet to grant him three hundred acres in any place where he can find it" [MBCR 3:430].  Within the year, Johnson had sold this land to Mr. William Parks [MBCR 4:1:354].

In his will, dated 30 September 1659 and proved 15 October 1659, "John Johnson of Roxbury" bequeathed to "my beloved wife" my dwelling house and certain lands "I have already given" during her natural life according to a deed, also £60 for her household furniture "which house and lands, after my wife's decease, I give unto my five children to be equally divided, my eldest son having a double portion"; to "my two grandchildren who have lived with me, Elizabeth Johnson and Mehittabel Johnson" £5 each; to "my sons Isaak Johnson & Robert Pepper" confirm the parcel of lands of fifty-five acres in the third division "I have formerly given" them; residue to "my five children equally divided, my eldest son having a double portion"; sons Isaac Johnson & Robert Pepper executors; "my dear brethren Elder Heath and Deacon Park" overseers; "If my children should disagree in any thing I do order them to choose one man more, to these my overseers, & stand to their determination" [SPR Case #218].

The inventory of "John Johnson late of Roxbury" was presented 15 October 1659 and totalled £623 1s. 6d., of which more than £350 was real estate: "20 acres of meadow," £80; "the house and land about it," £190; "one lot near Stoney River let to John Peairepoint for years," £40; "in the Great Lots one pasture of about twenty acres," £40; and "about ten acres of land near the Great Lots and twelve acres bought of Thomas Garner," £[blot].  Among the many domestic luxuries in this inventory were a considerable number of linens, cushions, rugs and blankets.  His personal military accoutrements included "two fowling pieces and one cutlass, £2" [SPR Case #218].

In her will, dated 21 December 1671 and proved 29 December 1671, "Grace Jonson" "very weak in body" bequeathed to "my two brothers Jonathan and Benjamin" all my estate equally divided; "my brother Jonathan Negus" executor; "they shall give to them that was helpful to me in my sickness" [SPR 7:175].

BIRTH:  By about 1588 based on date of first marriage.
DEATH:  Roxbury 30 September 1659 ("John Johnson, Surveyor General of all the arms, died & was buried the day following" [RChR 176].)
MARRIAGE:  (1) Ware, Hertfordshire, 21 September 1613, Mary Heath; she was buried at Ware 15 May 1629.
 (2) By 1633 Margery _____.  "Margery Johnston [sic] the wife of John Johnson" was #90 on Eliot's list and probably came to New England in the spring of 1633 [RChR 79].  "Margery Johnson, the wife of John Johnson," was buried at Roxbury 9 June 1655 [RChR 176].
 (3)  By 1656 Grace (Negus) Fawer, widow of Barnabas Fawer [MBCR 3:402]; she died after 21 December 1671 (date of will) and before 29 December 1671 (probate of will).
CHILDREN:
i  MARY, bp. Ware 31 July 1614; m. (1) by 1636 ROGER MOWRY; m. (2) Rehoboth 16 March 1673/4 John Kingsley.
ii  ISAAC, bp. Ware End, Great Amwell 11 February 1615/6; m. Roxbury 20 January 1636/7 Elizabeth Porter [NEHGR 148:45].
iii  JOHN, bp. Ware End, Great Amwell 8 April 1618; bur. Ware 8 July 1627.
iv  ELIZABETH, bp. Ware End, Great Amwell 22 August 1619; m. Roxbury 14 March 1642/3 Robert Pepper.
v  HUMPHREY, bp. Ware End, Great Amwell 5 November 1620; m. (1) Roxbury 20 March 1641/2 Ellen Cheney; m. (2) Roxbury 6 December 1678 Abigail (Stansfield) May, widow of Samuel May.
vi  JOSEPH, bp. Ware End, Great Amwell 20 April 1622; bur. there [blank] May 1622.
vii  SUSAN, bp. Ware End, Great Amwell 16 July 1623; bur. at Ware 16 August 1629.
viii  SARAH, bp. Ware 12 November 1624; bp. Ware 12 November 1624; m. (1) by 1647 Hugh Burt (possibly Hannah below was his wife); m. (2) by July 1653 William Bartram (child b. before April 1654).
ix  JOSEPH, bp. Ware 6 March 1626/7; bur. Ware 30 March 1627.
x  HANNAH, bp. Ware 23 March 1627/8; no further record unless she is the wife of Hugh Burt, above.
ASSOCIATIONS:   John Johnson's first wife, Mary Heath, was sister to WILLIAM HEATH and Isaac Heath of Roxbury.

While there is no doubt that one of the five children named by John Johnson in his will was at one time the wife of Hugh Burt, it is not certain which daughter, Sarah or Hannah, she might have been.  Sarah is the more likely candidate, and if it was she, then she went on to marry William Bartram.  This difficult and unsolved problem has been discussed by Helen S. Ullmann and by Dean Crawford Smith and Melinde Lutz Sanborn [TEG 6:178-84; Angell Anc 390; see also NEHGR 149:230-39].

COMMENTS:   John Johnson was the confidant of powerful men, filled an important position in the affairs of the early colony and in the development of its defenses, and was involved as an overseer, attorney, witness and appraiser in the affairs of many of his neighbors [Lechford 60, 207, 255, 294; SPR Case #43, 83, 96, 134, 196; SLR 1:30, 107, 137, 215, 238 327 2:237-38, 341; MA Arch 15B:151].  He owned a considerable estate at his death.  With all these advantages, he kept a low profile in his personal life and never achieved a consistent rank of "Mr."

John Johnson was freed from training, paying 10s. a year to the company, 31 October 1639, and the following year was freed entirely, in "regard of other public service without any pay to the company" [MBCR 1:282, 315].  This implied that he was not yet sixty years old in 1640.

A great tragedy to the Johnson family as well as the town of Roxbury, occurred when John Johnson's house, with a substantial supply of the colony's gunpowder therein, caught fire and burned in March of 1645. Many of the major diarists of the time recorded the event:

John Johnson, the surveyor general of ammunition, a very industrious and faithful man in his place, having built a fair house in the midst of the town, with diverse barns and other outhouses, it fell on fire in the daytime, no man knowing by what occasion, and there being in it seventeen barrels of the country's powder, and many arms, all was suddenly burnt and blown up, to the value of four or five hundred pounds, wherein a special providence of God appeared, for he, being from home, the people came together to help and many were in the house, no man thinking of the powder till one of the company put them in mind of it, whereupon they all withdrew, and soon after the powder took fire and blew up all about it, and shook the houses in Boston and Cambridge, so as men thought it had been an earthquake [WJ 2:259].
Eliot remarked,

In this fire were strange preservations of God's providence to the neighbors & town, for the wind at first stood to carry the fire to other houses, but suddenly turned & carried it from all other houses, only carrying it to the barns and outhousing thereby, & it was a fierce wind, & thereby drove the vehement heat from the neighbor houses [RChR 188].

At the General Court 14 May 1645, John Johnson moved that copies be made of important documents that had "very hardly escaped" the fire [MBCR 3:13].
Assistant Governor, Thomas Dudley, was a close associate of John Johnson's, and Dudley bequeathed to "John Johnson, surveyor general of the Arms and one of his beloved friends" £5 if he lived two years after Dudley's death, and asked that Johnson and the others should "do for me and mine as I would have done for them & theirs in the like case" [SPR Case #129].

Pope, for no apparent reason, credited John Johnson with a son John who "came to Roxbury" and was an "efficient citizen."

BIBLIOGRAPHIC NOTE:  John Johnson has been frequently treated in print by excellent genealogists.  In 1948 Mary Lovering Holman produced an account that would be the standard for many years [Stevens-Miller Anc 318-22].  In 1992 Douglas Richardson and the team of Dean Crawford Smith and Melinde Lutz Sanborn simultaneously and independently discovered the English origin of John Johnson and published useful information on his family and his many connections with other early New England immigrants [NEHGR 146:261-78; Angell Anc 377-91].

Mary HEATH [Parents] 1 was christened 2, 3 on 24 Mar 1593/1594 in Ware, Hertford, England, United Kingdom. She was buried 4, 5 on 15 May 1629 in Ware, Hertford, England, United Kingdom. Mary married 6, 7, 8 John JOHNSON on 21 Sep 1613 in Ware, Hertford, England, United Kingdom.

Mary Heath, was sister to William Heath and Isaac Heath of Roxbury.

They had the following children.

  F i Mary JOHNSON was christened on 31 Jul 1614. She was buried on 29 Jan 1679.
  M ii Capt. Isaac JOHNSON was christened on 11 Feb 1615/1616. He died on 19 Dec 1675.
  M iii
John JOHNSON was christened 1, 2 on 8 Apr 1618 in Ware End, Great Amwell, Hertford, England, United Kingdom. He died 3 on 8 Jul 1627 in Ware, Hertford, England, United Kingdom.
  F iv Elizabeth JOHNSON was born on 22 Aug 1619. She was buried on 7 Nov 1684.
  M v Humphrey JOHNSON was born on 5 Nov 1620.
  M vi
Joseph JOHNSON was christened 1, 2 on 20 Apr 1622 in Ware End, Great Amwell, Hertford, England, United Kingdom. He died 3 in May 1622 in Ware, Hertford, England, United Kingdom.
  F vii
Susan JOHNSON was christened 1, 2 on 16 Jul 1623 in Ware End, Great Amwell, Hertford, England, United Kingdom. She died 3 on 16 Aug 1629 in Ware, Hertford, England, United Kingdom.
  F viii Sarah JOHNSON was christened on 12 Nov 1624. She died in 1694.
  M ix
Joseph JOHNSON was christened 1, 2 on 6 Mar 1626/1627 in Ware, Hertford, England, United Kingdom. He died 3 on 30 Mar 1627 in Ware, Hertford, England, United Kingdom.
  F x
Hannah JOHNSON was christened 1, 2 on 23 Mar 1627/1628 in Ware, Hertford, England, United Kingdom.



No further record unless she is the wife of Hugh Burt, above.

John KINGSLEY. John married 1, 2 Mary JOHNSON on 16 Mar 1673/1674 in Rehoboth, Bristol, Massachusetts, United States.

John had a will 3 on 2 Sep 1677 in Rehoboth, Bristol, Massachusetts, United States. His will was probated 4 on 5 Mar 1678/1679 in Rehoboth, Bristol, Massachusetts, United States.

Mary JOHNSON [Parents] [scrapbook] 1 was christened 2, 3 on 31 Jul 1614 in Ware, Hertford, England, United Kingdom. She was buried 4 on 29 Jan 1679 in Rehoboth, Bristol, Massachusetts, United States. Mary married 5, 6 John KINGSLEY on 16 Mar 1673/1674 in Rehoboth, Bristol, Massachusetts, United States.

Other marriages:
MOWRY, Roger


Peter BULKELEY [Parents] [scrapbook] 1, 2 was born in 1405. Peter married Nicola BIRD.

Peter Bulkeley, a scion of the Bulkeleys of Bulkeley, co. Cheshire, held- Haughton, co. Cheshire, in right of his wife Nichola daughter of Thomas le Bird. Letters Patent granting annuity of 100 shillings to Peter de Bulkeley of Halghton by King Richard II 28 Sept. 1390.

Nicola BIRD [Parents] 1, 2 was born in 1405. Nicola married Peter BULKELEY.

They had the following children.

  M i John BULKELEY was born in 1430. He died in 1450.

Thomas le BIRD 1.

He had the following children.

  F i Nicola BIRD was born in 1405.

Robert BULKELEY [Parents] [scrapbook] 1 was born in 1326. Robert married Agnes CHEDLE.

From here back, this line has not been proven.

Agnes CHEDLE was born in 1328. Agnes married Robert BULKELEY.

They had the following children.

  M i Peter BULKELEY was born in 1405.

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