Ancestors of Tim Farr and The Descendants of Stephen Farr


Ingebret JONSEN (FLATER) was born about 1687 in of Royken, Buskerud, Norway. He died on 11 Mar 1765 in of Royken, Buskerud, Norway. Ingebret married Live THORESDATTER on 7 Jul 1720 in of Royken, Buskerud, Norway.

NOT PROVEN

Live THORESDATTER was born about 1688 in Royken, Buskerud, Norway. She was buried on 2 Oct 1753 in Royken, Buskerud, Norway. Live married Ingebret JONSEN (FLATER) on 7 Jul 1720 in of Royken, Buskerud, Norway.

NOT PROVEN

They had the following children.

  F i
Mari INGEBRETSEN (FLATER) was born on 22 Sep 1721 in Royken, Buskerud, Norway. She was christened on 12 Oct 1721 in Royken, Buskerud, Norway. She died in DOM P 1771 NATIVIT in Royken, Buskerud, Norway.
  M ii
Joen INGEBRETSEN (FLATER) was born in 1723. He was christened on 18 Apr 1723 in Royken, Buskerud, Norway. He died on 20 Mar 1808 in Royken, Buskerud, Norway.
  M iii
Thore INGEBRETSEN (FLATER) was born in 1725. He was christened on 22 Apr 1725 in Royken, Buskerud, Norway. He died on 10 Mar 1754.
  F iv Kari INGEBRETSEN (FLATER) was born on 8 Jun 1727. She died on 17 Nov 1771.
  M v
Evan INGEBRETSEN (FLATER) was born in 1730. He was christened on 16 Apr 1730 in Royken, Buskerud, Norway. He died on 3 Jun 1731.
  M vi
Hans INGEBRETSEN (FLATER) was born in 1730. He was christened on 16 Apr 1730 in Royken, Buskerud, Norway. He died on 3 Jun 1732.
  F vii
Dorthe INGEBRETSEN (FLATER) was born in 1732. She was christened on 20 Jul 1732 in Royken, Buskerud, Norway. She died on 25 Nov 1816 in Royken, Buskerud, Norway. She was buried on 25 Nov 1816.

Ole OLSEN was born in 1669 in Royken, Buskerud, Norway. Ole married Mrs-Ole about 1700 in Royken, Buskerud, Norway.

NOT PROVEN

Mrs-Ole was born in 1673 in Royken, Buskerud, Norway. Mrs-Ole married Ole OLSEN about 1700 in Royken, Buskerud, Norway.

NOT PROVEN

They had the following children.

  M i Peder OLSEN (STENBERG BITEN) was born in 1701. He died on 15 Oct 1769.

Richard ARNOLD [Parents] 1 died in 1745. Richard married 2 Mary WOODWARD in BY 1701 in Providence, Providence, Rhode Island, United States.

History of Woonsocket
by E. Richardson
Woonsocket: S. S. Foss, Printer, Patriot Building, Main Street, 1876.

---------------------------------------------------------------------- ----------


HISTORY. CHAPTER III.

Although I shall step out of the present limits of Woonsocket in so doing, still I deem it necessary to give the subdivisions of the estate of Richard Arnold II.  But I will make my narrative brief as possible.

This man married Mary Woodward, who presented him with six boys, namely - Richard, Woodward, Joseph, Thomas, Edmund and Josias.  Before his death he gave to each of these boys a farm.  He died intestate, June, 1745.

The farm which he gave to his son Richard still remains in the possession of the family.  It was given May 11, 1731, and comprised sixty acres, bounded on one side by the homestead farm, and on another by the 'thousand acre' purchase of Edward Inman, et als.  The young landholder is spoken of as a very ingenious man; and, June 6, 1733, during the minority of his children, he left his wife and family and went to Philadelphia, in pursuit of occupation more congenial to his taste.  He was never afterwards heard from.  The farm eventually became the property of his son, Stephen Arnold, a highly respectable citizens of these parts in the last century.  It is now owned and occupied by Abraham Arnold, the grandson of Stephen and brother to our townsman, Hon. Cyrus Arnold.

September 17, 1731, Richard gave to his son, Woodward Arnold, a farm lying within the 'thousand acre purchase', on the north-west part of Woonsocket Hill.  Six years afterward Woodward sold his inheritance to Nathan Staples, of Mendon, and removed to Massachusetts.  The farm has been known as the 'Nathan Staples's Place' for upward of a century.

Thomas Arnold inherited the homestead farm.  It passed to his son, Peleg Arnold.  During the latter part of the last century, the house was one of the taverns for which Woonsocket has been so famous.

Edmund Arnold was presented, December 29, 1735, with the farm which is now the property of Arnold Wakefield, Esq.

Josiah Arnold was given, February 22, 1736, and again October 15, 1737, an estate near Woonsocket Hill.  The area of the two estates was one hundred and forty-four acres.  Josiah was the father of Dr. Jonathan Arnold, of Revolutionary fame, and the grandfather of Lemuel Hastings Arnold, one of the Governors of our State.

Joseph Arnold was given an estate, October 20, 1731, but he resided upon it but a short season, if he did at all.*  His residence was where Mrs. Eliza Osborne now lives.  This he purchased of William, the son of Hezediah Comstock, in the year 1744, and became an innkeeper. Of Joseph Arnold I shall have more to say in another chapter.

*The farm which Joseph received from his father was afterwards occupied by his sons, Jacob and Dr. William Arnold.  I derive this from Joseph's will.  A portion of the estate is now owned by Arnold Wakefield.

I have said that Richard Arnold was the first settler of Woonsocket, and in this I am supported by documentary evidence, which I have given to the reader.  But the voice of tradition is against me, and, as paradoxical as the statement may be, the records are also against me. I will endeavor to explain myself.  That he was the first proprietor of the lands and the improvements thereon, is beyond dispute.  That he ever permanently resided here, may be doubted.  Dr. Seth Arnold is firm in the conviction that he did live here, and locates his residence near where now stands the slaughter-house of William H. Andrews, on the Globe side of the river.  His evidence is that of Rachel Arnold, the widow of Stephen Arnold, who at the beginning of the present century - she then being a very aged lady - pointed out the spot to him.  Mr. Thomas A. Paine is as decided in an opposite opinion, and says that it has been, for upwards of a century, a tradition in his family that JOHN ARNOLD, the son of Richard, was the first settler of Woonsocket.  I think that these two apparently opposite opinions may be satisfactorily reconciled.

p. 44 - 46.

In his younger days Richard Arnold probably lived in the valley of the Moshassuck.  While living there, he erected his saw-mill amid the solitudes of these parts.  It was not an unusual thing in those days for men to cultivate farms even which were many miles away from their places of residence.  I recall at this moment a tradition of Lime Rock, which speaks of a Pray family, who owned and cultivated lands in that vicinity and lived at Providence.  Indeed, in those times of Indian troubles, it would have been almost criminal for one to bring his wife and children away from a place of comparative safety.  But although not living there, it was imperatively necessary that a temporary shelter should be built.  And probably the temporary shelter of Richard Arnold was constructed at the place pointed out by Dr. Arnold.  That Richard Arnold lived at the Providence settlement when his will was written, is quite evident to the most careless reader.  I shall, therefore, yield to the opinion of Mr. Paine, and give to his great, great, grandfather, JOHN ARNOLD, the honor of having been the first settler of Woonsocket.

Mary WOODWARD. Mary married 1 Richard ARNOLD in BY 1701 in Providence, Providence, Rhode Island, United States.


Thomas STEERE.

Mary ARNOLD [Parents] 1. Mary married 2 Thomas STEERE in Providence, Providence, Rhode Island, United States.


John TEW [Parents] was born 1 about 1610 in Eydon, Northamtonshire, England, United Kingdom. John married 2 Ann.

John worked as Doctor of Physick in Towcester, Northampton, England, United Kingdom.

Other marriages:
SHEPARD, Amy

Ann 1. Ann married 2 John TEW.


John TEW [Parents] was born 1 about 1610 in Eydon, Northamtonshire, England, United Kingdom. John married 2 Amy SHEPARD on 29 Jan 1666/1667 in Towcester, Northampton, England, United Kingdom.

John worked as Doctor of Physick in Towcester, Northampton, England, United Kingdom.

Other marriages:
, Ann

Amy SHEPARD 1. Amy married 2 John TEW on 29 Jan 1666/1667 in Towcester, Northampton, England, United Kingdom.


Roger CORBET Knight [Parents] [scrapbook] 1, 2 died 3 in PROB 1394 in of Morton Corbet, Shropshire, England, United Kingdom. Roger married Margaret ERDINGTON.

Knight of Moreton Corbet and Shawsbury.

Margaret ERDINGTON 1, 2 died 3 in 1395. Margaret married Roger CORBET Knight.

They had the following children.

  M i Robert CORBET Sheriff was born about 1395. He died in 1440.

William MALORY [scrapbook] 1 was born 2 about 1380. He died 3, 4 in 1445 in England, United Kingdom. William married Margaret.

William resided 5 at Shawbury in 1425.

TAG Vol. 35, p. 104
Sir William Malory was born before 1386 and may have been born as early as 1382. He resided in 1425 at Shawbury, near Morton Corbet and died in 1445, probably at Shelton, Beds., or Papworth where his manor was on the border between Huntingdonshire and Cambridgeshire. His wife Margaret, mother of his son Thomas, was possibly a second wife. He had children, perhaps with others unknown:

1. Margaret, see below.
2. Thomas, born 1425 at Morton Corbet, Shropshire; his godfather was Thomas Charlton de Apley, whose son Robert later married his niece, Mary Corbet, below. The claim he was author of the Morte d Arthur is doubtful.

TAG Vol. 40, p. 98
IX. William Malory, named in the wills of both his parents, now seems to have been born about 1380, and to have had at least two wives. The supposed second wife, Margaret, who he married prior to 1423, was quite possibly descended from Giles do Erdington, for in Feudal Aids for 1428 it is noted that William Malory, chr., held three parts of a knight's fee in Shawbury, Shropshire, which Giles do Erdington had formerly held. By an early unknown wife, William Malory had, when young, a daughter:
X. Margaret Malory, born about 1397

Margaret 1, 2 was born 3 about 1397. She died 4 in 1438 in Shropshire, England, United Kingdom. Margaret married William MALORY.

Other marriages:
CORBET, Robert Sheriff

Malory was not Margaret's surname. After Robert died, she married William Mallory. Her children to us were with Robert Corbet. Margaret's original surname is unknown. The following article uses the wrong surname for Margaret and continues the line back to King Edward I. Gary Boyd Roberts points out that this line has since been proven incorrect due to the lack of a Mallory descent.

TAG Vol. 35, p. 104
Margaret Malory married Robert Corbet of Morton, Shropshire, and died in 1438 [Archaeologia, supra; Harleian Pub., vol. 28 (Visitation of Shropshire) pp. 100, 101; new ed., Complete Peerage vol. V. p. 88, note a; Cal. Inq. Post Mortem, 17 Henry VI]. "Margaret wife of Robert Corbet of Morton: heir is son Roger" [Sir Thomas Phillipps Inquisitions Post Mortem].

Roger is said to have been aged 24. years in 1438, which seems too old for the chronology, as it would imply that Margaret was born at least as early as 1400, and we cannot set the date of her father's birth earlier than 1382. The jurors may have overstated Roger's age in order to avoid his being made a ward to the Crown, always a costly proceeding. It seems likely that Margaret Malory was born a little later than 1400, possibly 1402-3; if her son Roger was born around 1419, he would have been 19 instead of 24 in 1438, and these dates and ages would be in harmony with other facts. It also seems likely that Sir Thomas Malory was a half-brother, son or a later marriage of her father.

Known children:
1. Roger Corbet, the heir.
2. Mary Corbet, see below.

TAG Vol. 40, p. 98
X. Margaret Malory, born about 1397, who married, perhaps through her stepmother's influence, Robert Corbet of Morton Corbet, Shropshire, a descendant of the Erdingtons named above. They had:
XI. Mary Corbet, born not far from 1430


John de DRYBY 1 was born 2 in 1312. John married 3, 4 Amy de GAVASTON on 18 Jun 1334 in England, United Kingdom.

VII. John de Dryby, the younger, born about 1312, who clearly married in or shortly before 1334 Amy or Anne do Gavaston, daughter of Piers do Gavaston by Margaret de Clare who was a granddaughter of King Edward I of England.

Amy de GAVASTON [Parents] 1, 2 was born 3 about 1312. She died 4 after 30 Nov 1357. Amy married 5, 6 John de DRYBY on 18 Jun 1334 in England, United Kingdom.

TAG Vol. 35, pp. 100-102
100
PIERS DE GAVASTON
ANCESTOR OF BULKELEY AND OTHER AMERICAN FAMILIES?

John G. Hunt², of Arlington, Virginia

On page 13 of Mr. Donald L. Jacobus  Bulkeley Genealogy (1933) is traced the descent of Rev. Peter Bulkeley from Mary, daughter of Robert Corbet of Morton, Shropshire. Her descent from Piers de Gavaston, who is not generally known to have left descendants, is believed to be as follows. Further evidence, either for or against, will be welcomed¹. Many of the historical details here given are not found in the new Complete Peerage or other British sources.

I. Piers de Gavaaton was patently son of Sir Ernaud de Gavaston, a knight of Edward I, whose wife was the lady Clarmunda de Marsan et de Louvigny, known in her lifetime as the lady Marcia [Walter Phelps Dodge, Piers Gavaston). Sir Ernaud evidently descended from "Ernald Gast" whom King John in 1200 granted certain lands near Bordeaux [Charter Rolls for that year]. Also see C. F. Tout, The Place of Edward II in English History (2nd .d., 1936, p. 12, note, which adds corroborative details touching Gavaston's Gascon kinsfolk. Piers became a favorite with Edward II, who created him Earl of Cornwall, and his sad story is well known.
He married, 1 Nov. 1307, Margaret, daughter of Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Gloucester, by his wife Joan de Acre, the king's sister (Dodge, op. cit.; Complete Peerage, new ed., sub Clare and Cornwal] His rise was rapid and his career was brief. He was executed 19 June 1312. In spite of the assertion in Dugdale's Baronage, in the 11th edition of Encyclopaedia Britannica, vol. 11, p. 539, and in the new edition of the Complete Peerage, that Piers left an only daughter, he and his wife had the following issue:

1. Joan, b. Ca. 1309, d. Jan. 1325 aged 15 years [Calendar of Inquisitions, Misc., vol. II, p. 326, No. 1329; cf. VCH, Wiltshire, vol. V]. "Joan, daughter of Piers de Gavaston, late earl of Cornwall, died in the priory of Amesbury on the feast of St. Hilary, 18 Edward II, she was of age of 15 years and died of illness. Thomas de Multon, lord of Egremont, alienated none of her lands before or after her death."
2. Another daughter (Amy, we hope to show), born soon after the feast of Epiphany (6 Jan.) 1312. Attention is called to the following in Rerum Britannicum Medii Aevi Scriptores (1883), Chronicles of Edward I and II, vol. II, Gesta Edwardi de Caernarvon auctore
Bridlingtoniensi, pp. 41-42:
"petrus rediit in Angliain
Item, secundum vim et virtutem ordlnaticmun praedlctarius Petrus de Gavastone saepedictus exilium admisit et modicum exulavit qula ante Nativitatem Domnini in Angliam est reversus, domino regis sicut prius adhaesit, ipsiusque secretarius est effectus; nec multum post Epiphaniam Domini in comitiva regis venit Eboracuxn [York], ubi coruitissa conjux sua filiam peperit; ob quam causam ibidem per tempus aliquot morabatur." The Monk of Malmesbury whose Vita Edwardi Secundi was published in 1957 writes (p. 21): "As Christmas [1311] approached the lord king and Piers set out for York and celebrated the feast at York," but a note states that the king was at York 18 Jan. to 8 April (1312], but not for Christmas.

II. Amy de Gavaston is believed to be this second daughter of Piers to whom his countess gave birth not long after Epiphany (6 Jan.) 1312. The first recorded of the dozen or so damsels of the chamber of Queen Philippa [wife of Edward III], Amy de Gavaston, was on 16 June 1332 granted for life the manor of Woghfield, Berks [Patent Rolls]. Lands in Essex were released to her 25 Feb. 1333, when she will have attained her 21st year [ibid.].
By 18 June 1338 she had married John de Driby [ibid.] and on 13 June 1340 is styled Anne, wife of John de Driby, when their manor of Wokefield, Berks, is named [ibid.]. The manor identifies her, and we suggest that her name, written Amie, was (as we shall later see in the will of her daughter Alice) misread as Anne, a very easy mistake to make.
There are several factors to support the thesis that Amy de Gavaston, wife of John de Driby, was daughter to Sir Piers:
(1) Her age corresponds with that of the unknown daughter of Piers born early in 1312.
(2) It is most improbable that a niece or other relative of Piers (or for that matter, an illegitimate daughter of his) would have had the influential connections, after his fall, to have the standing at Court which Amy de Gavaston enjoyed.
(3) Margaret de dare, widow of Piers de Gavaston, took as her second husband Hugh de Audley, cousin german to Roger de Mortimer of Wigrnore, whose forfeited lands of Woghfield (Wokefield) were granted for life in 1332 to Amy de Gavaston.
(4) As Margaret was cousin german to Edward III, he woula quite naturally make her daughter Amy a damsel in the chamber of his queen and would, without difficulty,

102 THE AMERICAN GENEALOGIST

have granted Wokefield to Amy for life at the supplication of Margaret. All the lands of Piers de Gavaston had escheated to the Crown on his demise, by reason of forfeiture, at the insistence of the barons who put Piers to death.
(5) Amy's daughter Alice (née de Driby) by her will in 1412 appointed as supervisor William, lord Ros [d. 1414], whose grandmother, Margaret, lady Stafford, was daughter of Margaret de Clara by her second husband, Hugh de Audley. Hence, if Amy was daughter of Margaret de Clara, the supervisor appointed by her daughter Alice was son of Alice's first cousin of the half blood. Often the person named as supervisor in mediaeval wills was the most influential kinsman.
(6) Margaret de clare's daughter and heiress by her second husband, Hugh de Audley, Margaret (b. ca. 1317), married ca. 1335 Half, lord Stafford (1299-1372), and had daughters named Elizabeth, Margaret and Beatrix (the last married Thomas, lord Ros, and was mother of the William, lord Ros, above mentioned). These Stafford ladies would be first cousins of the half blood of Alice de Driby, and we shall note that she named her three daughters Elizabeth, Margery, and Beatrix.
(7) Margaret de Clare was lady for life of Oakham and Egelton, Rutland. Feudal Aids, vol. 4, p. 207, gives "A D 1316, Ocham, Rutlands., held by Margreta de Gavaston, corn. Cornwall, lady of Okham & Egelton." When Amy's daughter Alice (née de Driby) lost her first husband, Sir Half Basset, in 1378, she as his widow obtained possession of lands he had held in her right: of Bredon, co. Leicester, of a carucate of land in West Keal, cc. Lincs., and of a rent of 3 shillings in Oak-ham, Rutland [C-. W. Watson in Misc. Gen. et Her., 5th series, vol. 8, pp. 202-6]. Bredon had come from the Driby family. Did the small Oakham right come in some way from her grandmother, Margaret de Gavaston? The daughter of Alice, Elizabeth Basset, was grandmother of Henry, Lord Grey of Codnor (1434-1495), who in 1 Rich. III had a grant of Oakharn and Egelton for his "good service against the rebels"did the ancestral connection play a part in the grant of these specific places? If not, it is a strange coincidence.

Notes:
The following is from "TAG Vol 40, pp. 95-96"
¹ THE EULKELEY DESCENT FROM PIERS DE GAVASTON
THIRD PAPER
By John G. Hunt, B.S.C., of Arlington, Va.

In this magazine for 1959 (35:100-106) and for 1961 (37:45-51) we presented reasons for supposing that Piers de Gavaston has living descendants, although the New Complete Peerage claims that his "only daughter" Joan died young. That he had another daughter, Amy or Anne, married to John de Driby (or Dryby), we Suspected but could not prove by direct positive evidence. We aie indebted to the research of Mr. Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr., for actual proof (the fine dated 1334. quoted under V below) that Amy (Anne) was indeed a daughter of Piers (Peter) ae Gavaston.

V. John de Dryby, born probably about 1268; he "appears to have had a black mark against him, for it is his next brother, Simon, when their uncle Hugh Dryby dies, who gets Dryby manor, and when Simon dies in 1323 he leaves it for life to his widow Margery and then to his younger brother, Robert" [Curzon and Tipping, Tattershall Castle, pp. 25 et seq.].
This John ae Dryby was legitimate, and a parson, as proved by a fine (recently noted by Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr.] quoted at page 18, Farnham's Leicestershire Medieval Pedigrees, 1925: "Fine, Trinity, 1334, between John de Dryby, of Tateshale, parson of a rnediety of,the church of Hedersete, pltf., and Roger de Estbriggeford, chaplain, and John Cleymond of Kirketon, dfdts., of the manor of Breedon, etc.; the manor is declared to be the right of Roger who granted it to John de Dryby for life with reversion to John son of Thomas de Dryby and Anne, daughter of Peter de Gavaston and the heirs of John."

96 THE AMERICAN GENEALOGIST

From the DeLisle and Dudley MSS, vol. I, p. 171, we note a charter of John de Dryby, lord of Tateshale, granting to Roger de Estbriggeford the chapel of St. Nicholas within the castle of Tattershall; witnesses: John de Kirketon, Humphrey de Littilberie, Robert de Littilberie, knights, and others: Monday, 13 Dec. 1333.
The said John de Dryby had the Breedon (or Bredon), Leics., estates settled upon him for life by his mother in 1323, when an inq. ad quod damnum shows that she wished, however, to ensure that the reversion of the estates would be to her right heirs. Moreover, in the same year she sought to prevent him from getting her other lands, granting Tatteshale, etc., to Gilbert de Bernake, parson of Tatter shall, in order to receive them back to her for life with remainder to Robert her son, "on whose death they shall remain to Wm. Bernake and Alice his wife" (her only daughter) and their issue [vol. 17, Great Britain, Record Office, Lists and Indexes; and Curzon and Tipping, op. cit.].
She must, however, have had a change of heart before she died. The inquisition following Joan's death in Oct. 1329 shows that eleven days before she died she had settled Breedon upon John (who then was aged ‘xl years and more  according to the jurors). This was a gift without any strings; thus he had the free disposition of Breedon, even though he was a parson, and thus not likely to beget (or to have begotten) any lawful issue. This may well indicate that she was aware of his having illegitimate issue to whom he wished to pass a landed estate. From Curzon and Tipping's cited work we learn that parson John in 1334, shortly before his death. passed Tattershal to Sir John do Kirketon who (in spite of ouster attempts by the de Bernakes) held Tattershall until he died in 1367, when it reverted to lady Bernake's descendant. It appears that de Kirketon was a cousin of parson John (see under IV, above).
A word now as to the age of the parson. As Robert de Dryby, the father, was dead in 1279, the son John had to be at least fifty years old in 1329 when the jurors styled him "xl years of age and more," and being the eldest of three surviving sons, he was probably more nearly "lx" years of age in 1329. Possibly "xl" was a clerical transposition for "lx" in the record. However, the ages stated for adults in inquisitions of that period are often far from exact, and round figures such as "30 and more" may be used for a mature man, and "40 and more" for a man of or above middle age.

² Editor's Note. Quite aside from the Bulkeley connection, for which evidence has been presented, we feel that Mr. Hunt, with an assist from Mr. Sheppard, has made an important historical discovery in proving that the unfortunate Piers de Gavaston left descendants by his near-royal wife, Margaret de Clare, granddaughter of Edward I, especially in view of the unanimity of English historians and peerage writers in asserting that their only daughter was Joan who died at the age of fifteen. Since the evidences and proofs have been split between three articles over the course of more than four years, I feel that they should briefly be summed up here for the benefit of all who may be interested. Mr. Hunt origina1ly was able to present only circumstantial evidence for his conclusion that Amy (or Anne) de Gavaston, wife of John de Dryby, was daughter of Piers de Gavaston and Margaret de Clare. The chief items of evidence were:

PIERS DE GAVASTON  99

(1) An early chronicle in Latin states that Piers do Gavaston had a daughter born soon after the feast of the Epiphany (6 Jan.] 1312 [supra, 33:100-1].
(2) The Patent Rolls show that Amy or Anne do Gavastori (the name is variously read], a damsel of the chamber of Edward III's queen, was granted a manor for life in 1332, and had lands in Essex released to her 25 Feb. 1333 when she will have attained her 21st year, and by 1338 was wife of John do Driby. The age perfectly fits the nameless daughter of Piers.
(3) Her proved daughter Alice, lady Basset, made William, lord Ros, supervisor of her will. He was a first cousin once. removed of Alice if Amy (or Anne) was daughter of Piers and Margaret. To this circumstantial evidence, the present article adds one item of direct proof:
(4) Amy (or Anne) was defiriitely called daughter of Peter [i.e. Piers] de Gavaston in the Dryby Fine of 1334.
The conclusion therefore seems to be unassailable. Her date of birth makes it certain that Margaret de Clare must have been her mother. If it be objected that she might have been illegitimate, that is easily answered. She is not called a "base" daughter in the Dryby Fine. The downfall of Piers do Gavaston was so catastrophic, and the hatred of the leading barons for him so great, that no tenderness would have been shown towards an illegitimate child. Only the fact that her mother was own cousin of King Edward III can explain her position in court, the grant of a manor to her for life, and her marriage into a gentry family of standing. I feel that future writers on the peerage and of thIs period in English history will have to give due consideration to the facts presented in Mr. Hunt's articles.


Piers de GAVASTON 1st Earl of Cornwall 1, 2 died 3 on 19 Jun 1312. Piers married 4, 5, 6, 7 Margaret de CLARE on 1 Nov 1307.

TAG Vol. 35, p. 100
I. Piers de Gavaaton was patently son of Sir Ernaud de Gavaston, a knight of Edward I, whose wife was the lady Clarmunda de Marsan et de Louvigny, known in her lifetime as the lady Marcia [Walter Phelps Dodge, Piers Gavaston). Sir Ernaud evidently descended from "Ernald Gast whom King John in 1200 granted certain lands near Bordeaux [Charter Rolls for that year]. Also see C. F. Tout, The Place of Edward II in English History (2nd ed., 1936) p. 12, note, which adds corroborative details touching Gavaston's Gascon kinsfolk.
Piers became a favorite with Edward II, who created him Earl of Cornwall, and his sad story is well known. He married, 1 Nov. 1307, Margaret, daughter of Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Gloucester, by his wife Joan de Acre, the king's sister (Dodge, op. cit.; Complete Peerage, new ed., sub Clare and Cornwal] His rise was rapid and his career was brief. He was executed 19 June 1312. In spite of the assertion in Dugdale's Baronage, in the 11th edition of Encyclopaedia Britannica, vol. 11, p. 539, and in the new edition of the Complete Peerage, that Piers left an only daughter, he and his wife had the following issue:

1. Joan, b. Ca. 1309, d. Jan. 1325 aged 15 years [Calendar of Inquisitions, Misc., vol. II, p. 326, No. 1329; cf. VCH, Wiltshire, vol. VI. "Joan, daughter of Piers de Gavaston, late earl of Cornwall, died in the priory of Amesbury on the feast of St. Hilary, 18 Edward II, she was of age of 15 years and died of illness. Thomas de Multon, lord of Egremcnt, alienated none of her lands before or after her death."
2.(TAG Vol. 40, p. 95) Amy.
In this magazine for 1959 (35:100-106) and for 1961 (37:45-51) we presented reasons for supposing that Piers de Gavaston has living descendants, although the New Complete Peerage claims that his "only daughter" Joan died young. That he had another daughter, Amy or Anne, married to John de Driby (or Dryby), we Suspected but could not prove by direct positive evidence. We are indebted to the research of Mr. Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr., for actual proof (the fine dated 1334. quoted under V below) that Amy (Anne) was indeed a daughter of Piers (Peter) de Gavaston. (see notes on Amy)

DEATH: Executed

Margaret de CLARE [Parents] [scrapbook] 1, 2, 3, 4 was born 5, 6 in 1292 in of Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England, United Kingdom. She died 7, 8, 9 on 9 Apr 1342 in France. Margaret married 10, 11, 12, 13 Piers de GAVASTON 1st Earl of Cornwall on 1 Nov 1307.

Other marriages:
AUDLEY, Hugh de Earl of Gloucester

They had the following children.

  F i Amy de GAVASTON was born about 1312. She died after 30 Nov 1357.

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