Ancestors of Tim Farr and The Descendants of Stephen Farr


James CUTLER Sr [Parents] [scrapbook] was born on 21 May 1605 in Sprowston, Norfolk, England, United Kingdom. He died 1, 2 on 17 May 1694 in Lexington, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. James married 3, 4 Mary KING on 9 Mar 1645 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

Other marriages:
GROUT, Anna
PAGE, Phoebe

According to the source listed below, James had three wives; Anna, Mary King and Phebe Page. He had children with each wife. The AF has all the children linked to one wife.
Source: "A Genealogy of The Cutler Family of Lexington, Massachusetts James and some of his Descendants 1634-1964" National Genealogical Society.  FHL #929.273 C973b

202        NEHGS NEXUS Vol. XV, No. 6
COLUMNS GREAT MIGRATION DIARY
by, Melinde Lutz Sanborn, F.A.S.C.

Just WHEN I THOUGHT it was safe to ignore the A-C sketches, RCA brings back the last three "C"s for Some detail work. James Cutler, Richard Cutting and William Cutting are all old friends: I met them all in the Same place, as a matter of fact, as James and Richard were featured in the first volume of The Ancestry of Eva Belle Kempton. (William just falls off the face of the earth, so he is fairly easy to handle.) Richard Cutting is a curious person. RCA wants some comment about why he waited until he was seventy before he joined the church, became a freeman, and served as a Watertown selectman. Fortunately, the minister quoted from Corinthians in his sermon, Unfortunately, the Corinthians quotation does not make any sense in this context. After a few minutes, it occurs to me that it needn't be l Corinthians. lt must be ll Corinthians, which describes a man who comes to an understanding of God before he becomes a member of the church. That leaves James Cutler, who really ought to be a snap but isn't. Everybody has worked on James Cutler: Mary Walton Ferris and J. Gardner Bartlett, to name but two. The problem is, they all come to the same conclusions. It should be safe to agree with them, but it turns out not to be.

I HAVE ALWAYS THOUGHT Cutler had too many daughters named Mary but the more I look at it, the more suspicious the whole farmily group looks. Jarnes Cutler had three wives and, by conventional wisdom, twelve children. The trick is to reconcile his will with what is known about the family from other records. After three days of working on a vague hunch - and looking at vital and probate records, deeds, town histories, compiled genealogies, and court records-it still does not add up. Finally, I decide to chuck everything and start from scratch. I hunker down with James's will and Torrey's New England Marriages Before 1700 and suddenly things start to happen. Cutler wrote his will in 1684 when he was 78 years old. He took care of his three eldest sons first, then said "the rest of my children, including with them the two children of my wife formerly the widow of Thomas King," were to have the rest of the estate divided between them. I list the people who got shares of the estate: John Coller, Richard Parks' wife, the wife of John Parmenter, Sarah Waite, Mary Johnson, Hannah Winter, Johanna Russell, Jemima [Cutler], and Thomas, John, and Samuel Cutler. Since they all got equal shares, I assume that all these people were children and not grandchildren representing deceased children. Given that, we can look for the two children of the second wife, Mary King. Clearly they were daughters, as none of the sons was named King. Torrey's index says that John Coller married first Hannah and second Mary Cutler. I tangled with John Coller's family in the Kempton book, and could never understand why the earlier genealogists picked Mary as John's wife when I could never find any evidence of another wife than Hannah. Sigh. I leave this blank, reserving room for John Coller's wife but not naming her.

Richard Parks' wife is another problem. There is little evidence of who she might be, although there is a deed in which she was called Mary. There is a birth record in Watertown for Mary Cutler in 1643. I go back to Mary Walton Ferris's analysis. Strangely enough, she did not connect Richard Parks' wife to the Cutler family. I assumed earlier that she believed that Richard's wife was one of the King girls. This is not right, either, and the Torrey entry reflects the confusion. Since there were three Richard Parkes alive at the time in question, someone chose the wrong Richard to connect to the Cutler and King families, asserting that a much too young Richard married a Sarah "King not Cutler."

I KNOW THE WIFE of John Parmenter was Elizabeth Cutler because they got into a little trouble before marriage, and James Cutler had to post bond for her. Sarah Waite was the wife of Thomas, She deposed in 1678 and died in 1743/44, so her age works out to make her a Cutler daughter of James's marriage to Mary King. Mary Johnson (another Mary!) was called Mary King when she married John Johnson. One King daughter down. Unless both King daughters were named Mary, the wife of Richard Parks must be Mary Cutler. This means Mary Cutler was not John Coller's wife. Hannah Winter. There is a birth record in Watertown for Hannah Cutler, She was the first daughter of james and first wife. It would be easy to match them up but I am suspicious now. If John Coller was not married to Mary Cutler, then his known wife Hannah could be Hannah King or Hannah Cutler. How to choose? I set the problem aside for the moment.

NEHGS NEXUS, Vol. XV, No.6 p. 203

Johanna Russell was born in 1661, based on an exact age at death, and was therefore necessarily a daughter of James' third wife, Phebe Page. Jemima was unmarried in 1684, but married soon after and had children. To be of childbearing age when Jemima Snow had her last recorded child, she must be the youngest of the Cutler daughters and a child of James and Phebe.

WHERE DOES THIS ALL LEAVE US? Clearly the King daughters were born before James married the widow King, so only the oldest girls could possibly provide the identity of the second King daughter. The only daughter old enough and mysterious enough is Hannah. The final clue lies in the phrasing of the will. When speaking of each of his daughters, James Cutler said "to my daughter," but in the case of Mary Johnson and Hannah Winter, merely said "I have already given to," never actually calling them his daughters. The order in which the daughters were named in the will also appears to proceed from eldest to youngest, given what else is known about them. This interpretation would mean that Hannah Cutler was the wife of John Coller; that Hannah King was the posthumous daughter of Thomas King and became the wife of John Winter; that Mary Cutler did not marry John Coller but was the wife of Richard Parks;  and that Sarah Parks, wife of one of the other Richard Parkses, was neither a King nor a Cutler. PHEW! All of the pieces were there, they just needed some shulffling. This means five new Torrey entries and lots of new ancestry for many Cutler and King descendants. (Of course, it does not begin to address the curious situation of the woman James Cutler called "my daughter Phebe," who was undoubtedly not a Cutler at all, but rather a daughter of the notorious Phebe Page by a previous liaison; see The Great Migration, second series.) Just one final problem. It seems that the last time I struggled with the identity of John Coller's wife I agreed with the previous genealogists who married him to Hannah___and then Mary Cutler. I did not just privately agree with them: I did so in print in The Ancestry of Warren Francis Kempton, complete with color frontispiece, autographs, photographs of gravestones, and transcriptions of documents. How to tell the author of this hook, one Dean Crawford Smith, that his editor is fallible? Oh, well, maybe he reads "Great Migration Diary" in NEXUS....

Melinde Lutz Sanborn, F.A.S.G., joined NEXUS as a Consulting Editor with the September-October issue, and "Great Migration Diary" will appear henceforth in each issue of the magazine. Ms. Sanborn is co-author - with Robert Charles Anderson, C.G., F.A.S.G., and George Freeman Sanborn Jr., F.A.S.G. - of The Great Migration, second series.

Mary KING died 1 on 7 Dec 1654. Mary married 2, 3 James CUTLER Sr on 9 Mar 1645 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

Widow of Thomas King of Watertown.
Source: "A Genealogy of The Cutler Family of Lexington, Massachusetts James and some of his Descendants 1634-1964" National Genealogical Society.

They had the following children.

  F i Elizabeth CUTLER was born on 22 Jul 1646.
  M ii
Thomas CUTLER was born about 1648 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.
  F iii Sarah CUTLER was born about 1653. She died on 17 Jan 1744.

John PAGE [Parents] 1, 2, 3 was born on 25 Sep 1586 in Dedham, Essex, England, United Kingdom. He was christened 4 on 25 Sep 1586 in Boxted, Essex, England, United Kingdom. He died 5, 6 on 18 Dec 1676 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. John married 7, 8, 9 Phoebe PAINE on 5 Jun 1621 in Lavenham, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom.

JOHN PAGE

ORIGIN:  Dedham, Essex
MIGRATION:  1630
FIRST RESIDENCE:  Watertown

CHURCH MEMBERSHIP:  On 23 May 1665 the Watertown selectmen ordered several persons, including "old Goodman Page & his wife," to attend the next selectmen's meeting "to answer for not attending their seats in the meetinghouse appointed them by the town" [WaTR 1:85].
FREEMAN:  Requested 19 October 1630 and admitted 18 May 1631 [MBCR 1:79, 366].
EDUCATION:  His inventory included a "Bible and two other small books" valued at 12s.
OFFICES:  Chosen constable for Watertown, 19 October 1630 [MBCR 1:79]. Trial jury in case of Walter Palmer, 9 November 1630 [MBCR 1:81].
ESTATE:  On 21 April 1631 "The house of John Page of Watertown was burnt by carrying a few coals from one house to another: a coal fell by the way and kindled in the leaves" [WJ 1:65].

Granted fifty acres in the Great Dividend in Watertown, 25 July 1636 [WaBOP 5]; granted thirteen acres in the Beaverbrook Plowlands, 28 February 1636/7 [WaBOP 7]; granted thirteen acres in the Remote Meadows, 26 June 1637 [WaBOP 10].

In the Watertown Inventory of Grants John Page was credited with five parcels of land: three acre homestall; thirteen acres plowland in the Further Plain [Beaverbrook Plowlands]; thirteen acres in the Remote Meadows; fifty acres in the Great Dividend; and three acres meadow [WaBOP 112].  In the Inventory of Possessions he held six parcels, and in the Composite Inventory the same six parcels: forty acre homestall (originally a Great Dividend lot, purchased of Edward Howe); twenty acres upland (part of a Great Dividend lot, purchased of John Coolidge); eighteen acres of meadow in Plain Meadow (eight acres purchased of Edward Howe, six of Robert Feake and four of Simon Stone); four acres meadow at Beaver Brook (purchased of William Jennison); seventy acres of upland, being a Great Dividend Lot (purchased of Simon Stone); and thirty-five acres of upland, being a Great Dividend lot (purchased of John Smith) [WaBOP 64, 144].

On 4 November 1646, with others, he pled poverty to be excused from paying a 14s. 5d. fine, but the court, understanding that some of those pleading were "of good ability," considered the matter closely [MBCR 2:164].

On 6 April 1658 John Page of Watertown and Phebe his wife sold to Isaac Mixture of Watertown seventy acres of land, being a dividend, lying in Watertown, also seven acres of remote meadow in the third lot [MLR 6:436-37].  On 26 February 1652[/3] John Page of Watertown and Phebe his wife sold to Joseph Child of Watertown "one small tenement" in Watertown containing one dwelling house and four acres of land [MLR 1:58-59].

The inventory of the estate of John Page of Watertown "who died about the 19th December 1676" was taken 16 February 1676[/7] and was untotalled but included real estate valued at £50: "half a dwelling house with about twelve acres of plain and four acres of meadow £50" [MPR 5:348].

The settlement of the estate witnessed a bitter dispute pitting John, the eldest son, against Samuel Page and James Cutler.  Cutler (husband of daughter Phebe Page) and Samuel Page claimed that John kept the estate entirely to himself and refused to make a division.  The court ruled in favor of John, finding the estate to be his [MCF 1687 III 251, 252, 228, 240, 167].

BIRTH:  Perhaps the John Page baptized Boxted, Essex, 25 September 1586, son of Robert and Susanna (Syckerling) Page [NEHGR 105:26].
DEATH:  Watertown 18 December 1676 "aged about 90 years" [WaVR 41].
MARRIAGE:  Lavenham, Suffolk, 5 June 1621 Phebe Paine; she was baptized Lavenham 1 April 1594, daughter of William and Agnes (Neves) Paine [NEHGR 69:251]; she died Watertown 25 September 1677 "aged 87" [WaVR 42].

ASSOCIATIONS:  Phebe (Paine) Page, wife of John Page, was sister of Elizabeth (Paine) Hammond, wife of WILLIAM HAMMOND of Watertown; of Dorothy (Paine) Eyre, wife of Simon Eyre of Watertown; and of William Paine of Ipswich [NEHGR 69:248-252, 79:82-4, 101:242-45, 105:25-27].

COMMENTS:  In a November 1630 letter to John Winthrop Jr., John Rogers, vicar of Dedham, Essex, reports that "this day I have received so lamentable a letter from one John Page late of Dedham that hath his wife and 2 children there and he certifies me that unless God stirring some friends to send him some provision he is like to starve"; as a result, Rogers donated 20s. to buy meal for the family [WP 2:316]. Dedham, Essex, is a parish adjacent to Boxted where records of this Page family are found.  The two children who came to New England with John Page are apparently Phebe and John.

Some sources claim that John Page had daughters Elizabeth and Mary living in 1660, but the evidence for this is not seen [NEHGR 101:242, 245, 105:26].

4 December 1638: "Isack Sternes & John Page were fined 5s. for turning the way about, & day was given till the next Court" [MBCR 1:247].

John Page took an unusual approach to the Watertown land granting process.  As shown by the Inventory of Grants, he received the usual sequence of land grants down to 1637, when he had his share of the Remote Meadows, but he did not share in any later grants.  About 1637 or 1638 he apparently sold off all these parcels which came directly to him from the town, for in the various inventories of Watertown land three of the five parcels appear in the hands of John Biscoe and one in the hands of Michael Barstow.  The fate of the homestall is unknown, but this was certainly sold as well, and as this parcel carried with it the proprietary rights in future divisions, John Page did not receive a Farm in 1642.

In the Composite Inventory, which showed landholding as of about 1644, Page held only parcels of land that he had bought from others, and these were almost all in the Great Dividend, close to one another but some way from the center of town.  Since Page received thirteen acres in the Beaverbrook Plowlands and in the Remote Meadows, and since his family had at most five members at this time, he must have had considerable wealth in cattle.  Combine this with his virtual absence from town affairs, and the occasional rebuke for antisocial behavior, and one has the picture of a man of some substance who was attempting to withdraw from society, build his own little empire, and interact as little as possible with authority.

Many secondary sources claim that the immigrant John Page removed to Groton in 1662 and returned to Watertown in 1675 after the burning of Groton, but this was the son John, as shown by the births of his children in Groton in the late 1660s and early 1670s, as well as records in Watertown that show that the elder John Page was still in Watertown during these years [WaTR 1:85, 94, 98].

James Knapp deposed in 1678 about working with John Page Jr. at Piscataqua, as many Watertown men of the second generation did, and how young John redeemed a mortgaged piece of John Sr.'s land [MCF 1678 III].  John Hammond deposed that "being at my Uncle Page's house my Aunt Page was very importunate with my Uncle to give Samuel Page a piece of land and my Uncle Page's answer was `Thou knowest it was mortgaged and my son John Page hath redeemed it and it is his'" [MCF 1678 III].  John Page Jr. submitted his account of things he had done for his father when the younger John was a single man, having managed his estate for ten years except about five months when he was in Long Island, and about a fortnight "to help James Cutler when his house was burnt" [MCF 1678 III].

At the court of 2 April 1650 daughter Phebe Page sued John Flemming and his wife for slanderously saying that she was with child.  This case illustrated a family at odds with itself; with the depositions of over twenty neighbors, it seemed that the entire town was talking about them [Pulsifer 1:6-8].  Flemming defended himself and said that his words were based on "the common practice of Phebe Page, & the report of her own friends."  "John Spring being on the watch on Saturday night after midnight testified that he met John Poole & Phebe Page together, and he asking them why they were so late, she answered because she could dispatch her business no sooner & he said he went with her because he lived with her father."  Anthony White also witnessed that "Phebe Page said she must either marry within a month or run the country or lose her wits," and also that "Phebe Page said my mother I can love and respect, but my father I cannot love." William Parker deposed that, having "much discourse with Phebe's mother, she wished her daughter had never seen Poole for she was afraid she was with child." White advised her to return to her father's house again and "she answered no, before I will do so I will go into wilderness as far as I can & lie down and die."  Perce witnessed that "Goodman Page coming to his house said thus that what with his wife and daughter, he was afraid they would kill him, and constantly affirmed the same."  Goody Mixture testified that "old Page said if she knew as much as he, Phebe deserved to be hanged."  Parker again testified "he living at Long Island & Phebe Page there also, she would not keep the house one night, but kept a young man company, and they were both whipped for it by the magistrates' order there, also that she confessed" and both were censured.  Joseph Tainter said "he was informed by one that lived at Long Island that Phebe Page confessed herself she had carnal copulation with a young man at the Island."  Phebe withdrew her action, and the Court granted the defendant costs £2 4s. 6d.  John Page Senior confessed a judgment of the costs of Court against his daughter.

Phoebe PAINE [Parents] was christened 1 on 1 Apr 1594 in Lavenham, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom. She died 2 on 25 Sep 1677 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. Phoebe married 3, 4, 5 John PAGE on 5 Jun 1621 in Lavenham, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom.

DEATH: Daughter of William Paine of Lavenham.

They had the following children.

  F i Phoebe PAGE was born in 1624/1625. She died on 17 May 1694.
  M ii John PAGE was born on 1 Jan 1630. He died in 1711/1712.
  M iii
Daniel PAGE was born about 1631 in Dedham, Essex, England, United Kingdom. He died 1 on 10 Aug 1634 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.
  M iv Samuel PAGE was born on 20 Aug 1633. He died in 1691.
  F v
Elizabeth PAGE.

  F vi
Mary PAGE.


William TROWBRIDGE [Parents] [scrapbook] was born 1 on 19 Nov 1684 in Newton, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. He died on 19 Nov 1744 in Newton, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. William married Sarah FULLUM on 30 May 1721 in Newton, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

Other marriages:
WARD, Sarah

A Deacon of the church, a lieutenant, and Selectman.
Source: Library of Congress "Genealogy of the Trowbridge Family" Page 157.
A slave holder, (s. of Dea. James,) m. Sarah, dr. of Jno. Ward, Jr., Dec. 14, 1708, took the end of his father in law's house.  Additional children:  two daughters, stillborn, 1720.  His will dated 1744, gives 5 pounds to the church, "to be loaned out so as not to depreciate, the interest thereof to be given to such poor widows as the Deacons judge proper."  To son James, 200 pounds; Hulda and Mary, 100 pounds each; Margaret, 200 pounds; Beulah, 200 pounds; Thaddeus, 50 pounds; chil. of his dr. Mary Coolidge, 325 pounds; wife Sarah, 50 pounds; and the residue of his estate to Lieut. Joseph Fuller, Lieut. William Hyde, Dea. John Stone, and Thomas Greenwood, in trust, for his w. Sarah, during her life; at her decease, two-thirds his real estate and one-fourth part of grist mill to son Thaddeus, and he to pay s. James one-fourth part of its value.  1719, Jno. Spring to William Trowbridge, a parcel of land, N. by land of John Ward and said Trowbridge, w. by a town highway, (Mill lane,) N.E. by Rev. Jno. Cotton's farm. 1721, John Ward ot his son in law William Trowbridge, the w. end of his now dwelling house, where said Trowbridge now dwelleth, and thirteen acres adjoining, w. on highway, and one-fourth part grist mill and stream.  1712, Susan, Hannah, Elizabeth, Sarah, and Rose Prentice, daughters of late James Prentice, Sen., to William Trowbridge, nineteen acres near the M.H., N. by Jno. Spring; w. by mill pond on Smelt brook; s. by heirs of Jonathan Hyde, deceased; an open highway runs through the same (Mill lane).  Lewis, his negro boy, born 1736; Nancy, his negro girl, born 1736.
Source: "History of Newton Massachusetts" by Francis Jackson

BIRTH: No date given

Sarah FULLUM was born on 2 Mar 1694. Sarah married William TROWBRIDGE on 30 May 1721 in Newton, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

Daughter of Francis Fullum, Esq. of Weston.

They had the following children.

  F i
Sarah TROWBRIDGE was born on 9 Mar 1722 in Newton, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. She died in 1735.

Source: History of Newton Massachusetts, by Francis Jackson
  F ii Margaret TROWBRIDGE was born on 16 Apr 1724.
  F iii Beulah TROWBRIDGE was born on 29 Aug 1726.
  M iv
Thaddeus TROWBRIDGE was born on 20 Nov 1728 in Newton, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

Source: History of Newton Massachusetts, by Francis Jackson
  F v
Abigail TROWBRIDGE was born on 12 Oct 1732 in Newton, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. She died in 1738.

Source: History of Newton Massachusetts, by Francis Jackson

Philip RUSSELL. Philip married 1, 2 Joanna CUTLER on 19 Apr 1680 in Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

Joanna CUTLER [Parents] was born in 1660/1661 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. She died on 26 Nov 1703 in Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. She was buried in Nov 1703. Joanna married 1, 2 Philip RUSSELL on 19 Apr 1680 in Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

Was a daughter of Phoebe not Mary.
Source: NEHGS NEXUS, Vol. XV, No.6, p. 203


John CUTLER [Parents] was born 1 on 19 Mar 1663 in Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. He died 2 on 21 Sep 1714 in Lexington, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. John married 3, 4 Mary STEARNS on 19 Jul 1693 in Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

Mary STEARNS. Mary married 1, 2 John CUTLER on 19 Jul 1693 in Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.


John POULTER [Parents] [scrapbook] was born in 1750 in East Molesey, Surrey, England, United Kingdom. He was christened on 27 May 1750 in Saint Faith, Havant, Hampshire, England, United Kingdom. He was buried 1 on 17 Feb 1828 in West Molesey, Surrey, England, United Kingdom. John married Jane CLIFIN Cliffen on 9 Jun 1775 in St Mary's, East Molesey, Surrey, England, United Kingdom.

John had a will 2 on 24 Sep 1827 in West Molesey, Surrey, England, United Kingdom. His will was probated 3 on 29 Oct 1828 in London, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom.

Extracted

Will of John Poulter  PRO National Archives
Probate 11/1747 Image reference 424

I, John Poulter, of West Moulesy, in the County of Surrey, gentlemen, being of sound mind Mind  Memory and understanding do make this my last will and testament in manner following, that is to say whereas I have and ____  ____   _____  three   hundred pounds stock  in the five per cent consolidated ___  ___ and I have the sum of one hundred pounds in the bonds of my friend ___ John Salford of Mortlake.  (Item) To hereby give and bequeath all the before named stock ____ and all ___ my estate and effects that I shall div __  of or ___ ___ ___ my friends William Turner the younger of Moulsey _____ and George Edmunds ffarmer of Moulsey and to their executors, administrators and assigns upon the trust following that is to say in the first place to sale the said stock and ___ in the said sum of one hundred pounds and all interest due thereon as soon as they can obtain the same after my decease  and upon further trust to pay to my son John Poulter the sum of forty pounds and to my daughter the wife of Joseph Lyons the sum of twenty pounds.  I give to my daughter Susan the wife of Edward my ___ ___ ___ and seals and after paying my just ___ funeral expenses to my expenses for proving this my will and all costs and charges to my said executors may be put to in the execution of this my will and subject thereto. I give said effects and bequeath all the rest and residue of my monies __ said effects ___  of what ___ or kind ___ that I shall ___ unto my said estate daughter Susan and my daughter Maria the wife of Mark Hollis equally between them share and share alike.  And I do hereby nominate ___ and appoint the said William Turner the younger and George Edmunds executors of this my will in ___ whereof I have ___ out my sound and seal the same having been first read over to me this twenty fourth day of September in the year of our lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty seven.  The mark of John Poulter   Signed sealed published and ___ by the said John Poulter the testor as and for his last will and testament the same having been first was to him in the presence of us Mary Carter, Willm Carter Kingston (?) Proved at London 29th October 1828 before the Worshipful ___ ___ Salusbury Dr of Lawe and swo by the oaths of William Turner the younger and George Edmunds the executors to whom admin was granted being first sworn duly to administor.

Jane CLIFIN Cliffen [Parents] was christened on 12 Sep 1759 in Cobham, Surrey, England, United Kingdom. She was buried 1 on 28 Jul 1818 in East Molesey, Surrey, England, United Kingdom. Jane married John POULTER on 9 Jun 1775 in St Mary's, East Molesey, Surrey, England, United Kingdom.

Extracted

They had the following children.

  M i
John POULTER was born 1 on 4 Apr 1776 in East Molesey, Surrey, England, United Kingdom. He was christened 2 on 14 Apr 1776 in East Molesey, Surrey, England, United Kingdom. He died 3 in 1862/1863 in East Molesey, Surrey, England, United Kingdom.
  F ii Elizabeth POULTER was born on 6 Feb 1778.
  F iii Sarah POULTER was born on 20 Oct 1781.
  M iv Thomas Arnold POULTER was born on 18 Jun 1787.
  F v Maria POULTER was born on 6 Jun 1793.
  F vi Susannah POULTER was born on 19 Apr 1796.

Thomas Arnold POULTER [Parents] [scrapbook] was born 1 on 18 Jun 1787 in East Molesey, Surrey, England, United Kingdom. He was christened 2 on 8 Jul 1787 in East Molesey, Surrey, England, United Kingdom. Thomas married Sarah DAVIS on 26 Sep 1814 in Ealing, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom.

Thomas worked as Cord Wainer.

Sarah DAVIS [Parents] [scrapbook] was born 1 on 7 Oct 1794 in Castle Hotel, East Molesey, Surrey, England, United Kingdom. She was christened 2 on 2 Nov 1794 in East Molesey, Surrey, England, United Kingdom. She died 3 on 3 Jan 1858 in East Molesey, Surrey, England, United Kingdom. Sarah married Thomas Arnold POULTER on 26 Sep 1814 in Ealing, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom.

They had the following children.

  F i Sarah Ann POULTER was born in 1815.
  M ii Thomas Ambrose POULTER was born on 1 Jun 1817. He died on 17 Jun 1892.
  M iii William POULTER was born on 3 Mar 1820. He died on 7 Mar 1866.
  F iv Jane POULTER was born on 30 Jan 1822.
  F v Ann POULTER was born on 22 Feb 1824.
  M vi Charles Thomas POULTER was christened on 19 Mar 1826. He died after 1852.
  M vii
Robert POULTER was born on 26 Nov 1827 in Esher, Surrey, England, United Kingdom. He was christened on 2 Mar 1828. He died on 7 Oct 1838.
  F viii
Eliza POULTER was born on 13 Oct 1829 in Dorset Wharf, Whitefriars, St Brides, London. She was christened on 8 Nov 1829.
  F ix Charlotte POULTER was born in 1831.
  F x
Mary POULTER was christened on 23 Feb 1834 in Hampton, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom.

Robert Frederick ALDOUS [Parents] [scrapbook] was born 1 on 17 Jul 1812 in Kelsale, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom. He was christened on 9 Aug 1812 in Kelsale, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom. He died 2 on 24 Aug 1896 in Huntsville, Weber, Utah, United States. He was buried on 27 Aug 1896 in Huntsville, Weber, Utah, United States. Robert married Mary Anne PARKIN on 24 Dec 1835 in Boston, Lincolnshire, England, United Kingdom.

THE LOG HOME BUILT BY ROBERT FREDRICK ALDOUS

Written and illustrated by Myrtle S. Hyde,
with gratitude for information from
Lester and Hazel Aldous, Adriana Aldous, Joseph Felt, Earl Felt, and Sidney Aldous
1968

On the following page is a composite drawing of the log home built by Robert Fredrick Aldous in Huntsville, Utah, in 1861, and occupied by his family in 1662, on the site where the present Lester Aldous home stands 7585 East 200 South). Traditionally, it was the first log house built in the town site of Huntsville. The east end of the house is to the right of the picture, and the rooms are in a single row.

From talking with older people, who can remember the house, it is learned that there were two lean-to porches, the one on the east entering into the “parlor,” and the one on the south opening into the kitchen.

Grandmother Mary Anne Aldous was a fussy housekeeper, and kept the parlor “special.” Joseph Felt tells that he used to help milk the cows, and sometimes went into the kitchen, but was never invited, as a farm hand, into the parlor.

On the porch by the kitchen was a trough built for the milk cans and kept full of cold water to cool the milk. The water was drawn from the well which was not far from the back door. There was another well on the other side of the house; perhaps it was dug first, while the house was still being built, and later circumstances made it convenient to have one on the south of the house, so another was dug.

The bedroom of the house was undoubtedly to the north of the kitchen­en, rather than between parlor and kitchen. When company came to stay, beds were made in the attic, or loft.

The room on the north end, beginning with the door at the left of the picture, is still being used, as a coal house, and has been moved from its original location. It was built on after the rest of the house had been completed, and was never finished, the floor being just a hole in the ground. Grandmother Aldous worried that grandchildren would open the door and fall into the hole, so she told them it was the “Boo Room,” and to stay away. The ceiling is low with the top of the doorway reaching to it. In probability all the ceilings of the house were the same, just barely clearing the head of Robert. Aldous, who was about six feet tall. His daughter-in-law, Ethel, of average height, who lived in the house for several years, said that the ceilings were so low she white-washed them while standing on the floor.

If memories are correct there were two chimneys, one for the kitchen and one for the parlor.

Possibly too many windows are drawn into the picture of the house. The window on the left is illustrated as it exists, with one side sharing its frame with the door. This was the easiest way to build a window into a log structure, and in this case, it is the only window in the room. Perhaps the other rooms had just one window each also, and if this is the case, one or two of these were very likely on the other side of the house. If the rooms had more than one window there were  probably this number on the south of the house, as drawn.

Little can be learned about the shrubs and trees on the grounds, except for the poplars that Robert Aldous planted, and an apple tree in the southeast corner of the lot.

Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, p.711
ALDOUS, ROBERT (son of James Aldous and Mary Ann Page of Huntingdonshire, Eng,). He was born July 17, 1811, Kelsale, Suffolk, Eng. Came to Utah Sept.
14, 1853, Claudius V. Spencer company.
Married Mary Ann Parkin Dec. 24, 1835 (daughter of Luke and Nancy Parkin). She was born Nov. 9, 1814, and came to Utah with husband. Their children: George P. b. Oct. 30, 1836, m. Christiane M. Thurston Dec. 24, 1865; Georgiana M. b. April, 1838, m. Martin Harris; Charles b. April 9, 1840, m. Lucy Drake Nov.
26, 1862; Frederick b. [p.712] Nov., 1841, m. Margaret Wilson; Angeline P. b. Dec. 27, 1843, m. Brigham Bingham Dec. 24, 1862; Henry b. 1845, died. Family home Huntsville, Utah.
Worked on some of the first public works in Salt Lake City; also on Ogden tabernacle; superintended the building of three bridges in Ogden canyon when first opened. Carpenter and builder; built first school in Huntsville and was its first superintendent; also built first log house there. Watermaster five years. Seventy; high priest.


Robert Frederick Aldous

As written by his granddaughter, Sarah Alice Aldous (Halgren), with added information as noted. Compiled by Myrtle S. Hyde, 1960.

"My grandfather, Robert Fredrick Aldous, was born 17 July 1812 in Kelsale, Suffolk, England," one of fourteen children of James Aldous and Mary Page, his father being a carpenter by trade. Robert received such an education as the common schools of his vicinity could afford, and at the age of seventeen moved with his parents to Fenstanton, Huntingdonshire, England. There he learned carpentering, and assisted his father on the estate of Rev. L. R. Brown. ("History of Utah," by Orson F. Whitney, Vol. 4, p. 433)

"At the age of twenty-four he apparently had achieved some measure of economic independence, at least sufficient to marry, and on 24 December 1835 he was wed to Mary Anne Parkin, the daughter of Luke Parkin and Ann Hancock. His wife was twenty-one years old at the time, having been born 9 November 1814."

He and his wife subsequently resided in Fenstanton, and all of their six children (George, Georgiana, Charles, Fredrick, Angelina and Henry) were born there. Henry died at the age of nine months, but the rest "were seemingly healthy and hardy"

Robert first heard the gospel preached by a Mormon Elder in front of his father's house. He was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints on December 23, 1849. Six months later he was ordained an Elder, and soon after was appointed president of the Fenstanton Branch. The duties of that office he faithfully discharged as long as he remained in his native land. ("History of Utah," ibid.)

"He and his wife and their children sailed from Liverpool, England on the ship "James Pennell" 2 October 1850. They were members of a company of 264 saints under the direction of Elder Christopher Layton."

The following is an excerpt from the Millennial Star, describing their passage:
Robert, along with Mary Ann, George Georgiana, Charles Frederick and Agelina came to the States with the Fiftieth Company on the ship "James Pennell".

"FIFTIETH COMPANY. -- James Pennell, 254 souls.  On Wednesday October 2nd, 1850, the ship James Pennell sailed from Liverpool England, with two hundred and fifty-four Saints on board, under the direction of Christopher Layton, an American elder, who had been in England on a visit.  After an ordinary passage, the ship arrived near the mouth of the Mississippi River, and the passengers were jubilant at the prospect of soon landing on the shores of the promised land, when a terrible storm met the ship and drove her far back into the gulf, breaking her main and mizen masts, and washing part of her rigging overboard.  In this disabled condition, the emigrants, exposed to wave and wind, drifted about for several days, until the provisions on board were nearly all consumed, and starvation commenced to stare the emigrants in the face; but, finally, the crippled vessel was found by a pilot boat, and conducted to the mouth of the river, where, on the twentieth of November, she sailed up along side of the Joseph Badger, which had sailed from Liverpool with another company of Saints, over two weeks later than the James Pennell.  The two ships were now towed up together to New Orleans, where they arrived the twenty-second of November.  The next day the emigrants from the James Pennell continued the journey up the river to St. Louis, Missouri. There and in the surrounding country, they found employment for the winter, and the following year a part of them wended their way to the Valley, while others remained in St. Louis for years, before they continued the journey to Utah.  (Millennial Star, Vol. XIII, page 9.) "

"Wed. 2. [Oct. 1850] -- The ship James Pennell sailed from Liverpool, England, with 254 Saints under the direction of Christopher Layton. It arrived at New Orleans Nov. 22, 1850."

"The family lived in St. Louis for Two and one-half years. Then in the spring of 1853, they joined the Claudius V. Spencer company, which left Council Bluffs, and crossed the Missouri River on the 3rd day of June." Robert's outfit consisted of a wagon, a yoke of oxen and a cow. The only exciting incident of the journey was when the travelers met a band of five hundred Indians, whom they placated with gifts of sugar and tobacco, and were allowed to pass on unmolested. The date of arrival at Salt Lake City was September 14, 1853. after a month's stay in the city he moved to Ogden, and thence went to Bingham's Fort (the name of that place changed to Lynne, and later
incorporated into Ogden City). There he remained seven years. (History of Utah, ibid.)

"In the summer of 1861, according to available information, he, together with a group of other man (among whom was David McKay, father of President David O. Mckay) spent considerable time harvesting and putting up wild hay growing in the valley. He was also among a group of seven men who in 1861 assisted one David Jenkins (presumably a government surveyor) laying out the town site of Huntsville. In 1862 he moved his family to Huntsville, where he was a prominent citizen, and did much in a quiet unassuming way to build up community.

Because he was a skilled carpenter and builder, his services were in demand. He labored at various employments--first upon the public works at Salt Lake City, then upon the Ogden Tabernacle, and in opening Ogden Canyon, where he superintended the building of three bridges. He helped to build the first log school house in Huntsville, and superintended the building of a rock school house at the same place. The latter was constructed with a dome ceiling, and was considered a "wonderful piece of work" (John Henry Aldous wrote this in a letter to Sarah Alice Aldous Halgren, in 1955). He also assisted with his means in the erection of the meeting house and other edifices. He helped lay out the Huntsville irrigation system, as well as the mountain canal on the north side of the valley; John Henry Aldous, in the letter referred to above, says he did "it with (a) common spirit level. It must be about 13 miles long and it is as true as if it had been done with a up to date surveying instrument."

Robert Aldous was one of the first school teachers in Huntsville, and for five years was water master, serving in both positions without compensation. In the Church he held successively the offices of Elder, Seventy, and High Priest.

those who knew Robert Aldous remember him as being a tall man (over six feet) with a very short wife. He was relatively deaf, and carved an ear trumpet, asking people to talk into it to enable him to hear them. He always went to church, and took his foot long trumpet with him. Adriana Aldous (the wife of Robert's great-grandson) writes the following about Robert Aldous,

"His dry wit was much appreciated by his fellow townsmen. after the rock school house was completed, it often was cold there during the severe winter months; it was decided that they should put the stove on the opposite side of the building from where the chimney was, by the next winter, and put stove pipes along the ceiling (or close to it) so more heat would stay in the building instead of going up the chimney. Robert Aldous gave a load of barley to buy the stovepipes with. Bishop Hammond took the barley to Ogden and traded it for the stovepipes, which were installed. Upon completion, Bishop Hammond in Sacrament Meeting drew the attention of the ones present, to the beautiful new stovepipes he had gone to Ogden for and bought, giving the impression that he was the donor. The elderly Sister whom related the story to me said "Robert Aldous stood up and in his dignified way, yet with a little rougish smile on his face, said, 'Well Bishop, you did go to Ogden and bought the stovepipes, what is very commendable, but just remember, my barley (he pronounce it bearley) paid for it.',and sat down." She said it pleased the people and many a chuckle could be heard. As a rule, Robert Aldous went along not letting his right hand know what his left one did; he was kind hearted and generous."

Robert Aldous lived to the age of eighty-four years, dying in Huntsville on the 24th of August 1896.

Mary Anne PARKIN [Parents] [scrapbook] 1 was born 2 on 8 Nov 1814 in Boston, Lincolnshire, England, United Kingdom. She was christened on 17 Nov 1814 in Boston, Lincolnshire, England, United Kingdom. She died 3 on 21 Apr 1892 in Huntsville, Weber, Utah, United States. She was buried on 24 Apr 1892 in Huntsville, Weber, Utah, United States. Mary married Robert Frederick ALDOUS on 24 Dec 1835 in Boston, Lincolnshire, England, United Kingdom.

Of interest in this family is the parentage of Mary Anne Parkin. Some family records state that her mother was Ann, others that she was Nancy Ann. The only documentary evidence found thus far in regard to her name is the christening records of Mary Anne and some of her brothers and sisters--in which record the mother is given as "Ann"--therefore it seems wise to use this unless or until we find something further. We are working on the Parkin genealogy, and have spent many, many hours, written numerous letters, and spent a moderate sum of money, with still very little new information coming to light. The things we have found are too involved to present here.

by Myrtle S. Hyde


Biography of Mary Anne Parkin Aldous

Written from information obtained in response to letters written to granddaughters and grandsons (see footnotes), with added information from research by Myrtle S. Hyde, Dr. Jay A. Aldous, and Mabel G. Peterson. Compiled by great-granddaughter Mabel G. Peterson 1963.

Mary Anne Parkin Aldous was born 9 Nov. 1814 in Boston, Lincolnshire, England, the fifth child and third daughter of Luke and Ann Hancock Parkin. Other children in the family are as follows: Sarah, the oldest daughter was born in 1807, a deaf mute. It is not known whether this affliction was from birth or came as a result of of an illness. She was never married. William the first son was born in 1808. He was not mentioned in his father's will (1848) so undoubtedly passed away prior to that time. Luke was born in 1810 and died in 1813.

Jesmina was born in 1811. Mary Anne called her Jesie, and was perhaps closer to her than her other sisters. (Footnote #3) Jesmina acted as a witness at Mary Anne's marriage. At this time she was twenty-four years of age, and unmarried. At the time her father's will was made, her name was recorded as Jemina and she had married James Jamison.

Eliza was born in 1816 and married Henry Simon Hurren. The youngest child, Jane , was born in 1820. She was married to Peter Pinder and was thirty-one years of age when the 1851 census was taken. After the death of her mother, Ann Hancock Parkin (1844), her father Luke Parkin and her eldest sister Sarah made their home with her. Luke Parkin was much concerned about the welfare of his eldest daughter, because of her affliction, and left specific instructions in his will that his property was to be used for her care and was not to be divided among the other heirs until after her death. (Will, 1848; and census, 1851.)

Mary Anne received $500.00 inheritance from her father's estate after she was living in Huntsville, Weber County, Utah. (Footnote #3)

Very little is known of Mary Anne's early life in schooling, but apparently she must have received the maximum education available for girls of her day.  She always used very proper precise language and retained English wording and accent (she called an apron a pinafore, etc.).  (footnote #1)

Mary Anne's father was a prosperous artisan jeweler, gunsmith, and cutler, and it was an aristocratic well to do home, provided with the luxuries of the time.  Here Mary Anne was taught to be meticulous and to care well for her belongings.  She did not learn to sew, so the family must have hired a dressmaker.  (footnote #4)

Mary Anne was married to Robert Frederick Aldous, a young carpenter, 24 Dec. 1835 when he was 24 years of age and she was 22.  Robert must have been a handsome, fine looking young man, tall, 6 feet or over, while Mary Anne was a winsome 5 feet 2. Her hair was light colored and her eyes were blue.  As far as we know she never had a picture taken. (footnote #4)

It is said that she first met Robert when he was hired to do some carpenter work for her father.  Her parents were displeased when she married a craftsman, and as they thought, beneath her station in life, when she could have married "royal blood".  (footnotes #2 and #3)

The young couple resided at Fenstanton, England and Robert was able to provide a good home for his wife and growing family.  They became parents of 6 children all born at Fenstanton.  George Parkin Aldous was born 30 Oct. 1836; Georgiana born 5 Aug. 1838; Charles born 9 Apr. 1840; Fredrick Robert born 18 Feb. 1842;Angelina Theresa born 27 Dec. 1843; Henry Parkin born 21 Jan. 1846.

Sadness came to Mary Anne when her mother passed away in 1844.  Death again saddened their home 19 Oct. 1846 when the baby, Henry Parkin Aldous, passed away at the age of 9 months.

It was about 2 years later that Robert heard the gospel preached by a young Mormon elder in front of his father's house.  He and Mary Anne became convinced of the truthfulness of the gospel and they were baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 29 Dec. 1849.  Six months later Robert was ordained an elder and soon after was appointed as president of the branch at Fenstanton, a position he faithfully discharged as long as he remained in his native land.  (Whitney, Orson F. History of Utah, Vol. 4, p. 433)

In spite of family opposition and social pressure Mary Anne faithfully sustained her husband in all of his church responsibilities.  Robert and Mary Anne desired to obey divine command and to join with the body of the saints in Zion, so, disposing of their properties they, with their children, sailed for America from Liverpool, England on the ship "James Pennell" 2 Oct. 1850.  They were members of a company of 254 saints under the direction of Elder Christopher Layton.

The emigration of saints from foreign countries was under the direction of the first presidency of the church and was well organized for the comfort, safety, and well being of the saints, and so far as possible, certain requirements were met.

Passengers were required to board the ship either the day of their arrival in Liverpool or the day following.  Here they were placed under the supervision of a president and two counselors received by vote.  This presidency was responsible for dividing the emigrants into wards or branches, with an Elder in charge over each ward.  Watchmen were appointed and a schedule made for cleanliness, recreation, preparation and eating of meals, study, worship, and sleep.

The price of steering passage to New Orleans ranged from £3 10s. to £5 for adults, and from £3 to £4 10s.  For children aged 1 to 14.  Infants were free.  By law, provisions for 70 days were to be stocked on ships sailing between the 16th of Jan. and the 14th of Oct. on the following scale:  3 qts. water daily, 2 1/2 lb. bread or biscuit, not inferior in quality to Navy biscuit, 1 lb. wheaton flour, 5 lbs. oatmeal, 2 lb. rice, 1/2 lb. sugar, 2 oz. tea, 2 oz. salt, weakly to each adult, and 1/2 this amount to children from 1 to 14 years, except water.

In addition to the above scale, the LDS emigrants were furnished with 2 1/2 lbs. sugar, 3 lb. butter, 2 lb. cheese, and 1 pt. vinegar for each adult and 1/2 this amount for children.  This would enable many of the passengers to live more bountifully than they had been accustomed.

Those who could afford to were advised to procure more flour and sugar and such articles as potatoes, ham, dried salt fish, onions, pickled onions, preserves, cayenne pepper, baking powders, mustard, sherbet, carbonate of soda, lime juice, plums and currants. Marine soap was recommended as useful.

Emigrants were urged to bring the best tools of their trade, useful books, and if a professional man, a few of the most useful instruments and treatises pertaining to his profession. (Extracts from: Peircy, Fredrick and Linforth, James Route from Liverpool to Great Salt Lake Liverpool, F.D. Richards, 36 Islington MDCCCLV)

It was under these conditions that Robert, Mary Anne and their children traveled, and in compliance with the council given, Robert brought some of the finest carpenter tools which were very useful when he reached Deseret. Mary Anne must have had many a heartache as she left her lovely things behind and packed the bare necessities. However, womanlike, she did bring one or more silk dresses and a black bonnet trimmed with ribbons and violets, an outfit she reserved for church going and the most special occasions. (Footnote #4)

After an ordinary passage, the ship arrived near the mouth of the Mississippi River and the passengers looked forward to the prospect of landing on the shores of the Promised Land. A sudden terrible storm drove the ship back into the gulf, disabling the ship so badly that it floundered helplessly and drifted about for several days. The passengers were exposed to wind and wave and most of them became desperately sea-sick. Provisions were nearly consumed and starvation commenced to stare the emigrants in the face. At last, the crippled boat was found by a pilot boat and conducted to the mouth of the river, where it joined the "Joseph Badger" which had sailed from Liverpool two weeks later than the "James Pennel." (See the Millennial Star Vol. 13, p. 9-10.)

During the height of the storm, either from fright or despair, Mary Anne was about to be washed overboard. Her son Charles threw his arm around his mother and held on until she regained her balance. (Footnote #3)

They continued their journey up the river to St. Louis where Robert found employment to replenish their funds for the remainder of the journey. They remained here two and one half years. In the spring of 1853, they joined the Claudius V. Spencer Company, which left Council Bluffs, crossed the Missouri River on the 3rd day of June and arrived in the Salt Lake Valley Sept. 14, 1853. (History of Utah, ibid.)

The family resided in Salt Lake a short time while Robert's skill was soon put into active use working on some of the public works. They then moved to Ogden and Robert worked on the Ogden Tabernacle and superintended the building of three bridges in Ogden Canyon when it was first opened. He also built the first log house in Huntsville. (Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah p. 712.)

Beautiful, green Ogden Valley must have reminded the Aldous' of their native land and appealed to them as the place they desired to make their permanent home. So in 1862 Robert moved his family to Huntsville, Weber County, Utah. Robert accomplished many civic , educational, and church obligations, while Mary Anne was busy keeping her home and in a quiet unassuming way became an integral part of community life. (Footnote #5)

It was a busy life for a pioneer wife and mother. Dairying was an important industry in Huntsville because of the excellent pasture. The Aldous family was engaged in this business; Mary Anne made cheese and cream was sold. The milk was placed into large six or ten gallon cans and the cans were placed in cold water to cool. There were no separators, so the cream had to be dipped from the top of the milk with a pointed-bottomed dipper. The skim milk was fed to pigs. Mary Anne wore gray calico dresses--of course with long sleeves, to do her work. She would roll the sleeves up while she was working with the milk, or other tasks for which they would be in the way, and then roll them back down. She was very economical and wasted nothing, some said, "she would skin a cat for its hide and tallow." (Footnote #4)

She was very religious and always attended church, wearing a black silk dress and the bonnet with the violets on it. Immediately, on returning home, she would take it off, a habit she had learned in England. (Footnote #4) It is said, as she and Robert walked to church, she was usually a pace or two behind him. (Footnote #2) This is very understandable when the difference in their height is considered. With his height and long legs she would have found it difficult to keep up with him without running, because of her diminutive size, and she was far too dignified to do such a thing.

She wore her hair combed straight back with a knot on the back of her neck. She was of medium build and carried herself tall and straight. She had a rather broad nose and was resembled more by her son George than by the other children. (Footnote #4)

Mary Anne enjoyed having her grandchildren come and usually tried to have some treat to give them. (Footnote #7) Another grandson remembered her as a good cook and housekeeper. (Footnote #6)

She enjoyed life to the end. The day of her passing she walked all over Huntsville (perhaps Relief Society teaching) and was just straight as an arrow. Anyone seeing her from a distance would have thought she was a young girl. (Footnote #1) After eating her dinner she suffered a stroke and passed away 21 April 1892 at the age of 78. She was buried in the Huntsville cemetery.
*************************************************************
Footnotes:  We are indebted to the following granddaughters and grandsons for answering by letter questions on the life of Mary Anne Parkin Aldous:
#1 Hannah Aldous Bihler, #2 Jean Aldous Taylor, #3 Alice Aldous Halgren, #4 Risha Aldous Ray, #5 Mabel Aldous Slater, #6 Edward Charles Aldous, #7 Henry Aldous

They had the following children.

  M i George Parkin ALDOUS was born on 30 Oct 1836. He died on 13 Feb 1918.
  F ii Georgiana Maria ALDOUS was born on 5 Aug 1838. She died on 30 Oct 1858.
  M iii Charles ALDOUS was born on 9 Apr 1840. He died on 10 Aug 1924.
  M iv Frederick Robert ALDOUS was born on 22 Feb 1842. He died on 16 May 1909.
  F v Angeline Theresia ALDOUS was born on 27 Dec 1844. She died on 28 Jul 1929.
  M vi
Henry Parkin ALDOUS was born on 21 Jan 1846 in Fenstanton, Huntingdonshire, England, United Kingdom. He died on 19 Oct 1846.


Thomas PARK [Parents] 1 was born 2 in 1628/1629 in St Botolph, London, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom. He died 3 on 11 Aug 1690 in Newton, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. Thomas married 4, 5 Abigail DIX on 1 Dec 1653 in Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

Other marriages:
, Margery

Mentioned in father's will. Crippled in King Phillip's War, 1675.

Abigail DIX [Parents] was born 1 on 21 May 1637 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. She died 2 on 3 Feb 1689/1690 in Newton, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. Abigail married 3, 4 Thomas PARK on 1 Dec 1653 in Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.


Source: "History of Newton Massachusetts" by Francis Jackson

They had the following children.

  M i Thomas PARK was born on 2 Nov 1654. He died on 28 Aug 1681.
  M ii John PARK was born on 6 Sep 1656. He died on 21 Mar 1718.
  F iii Abigail PARK was born on 3 Mar 1658/1659. She died on 1 Mar 1745.
  M iv Edward PARK was born on 8 Apr 1661. He died on 1 Mar 1745.
  M v Richard PARK was born on 21 Dec 1663. He died on 19 Jun 1725.
  F vi Sarah PARK was born on 21 Mar 1665/1666. She died on 19 Dec 1727.
  F vii Rebecca PARK was born on 13 Apr 1668.
  M viii Jonathan PARK was born on 27 Aug 1670. He died on 23 Jan 1718/1719.
  F ix Elizabeth PARK was born on 28 Jul 1679.

Richard PARK [Parents] was born 1 on 21 Dec 1663 in Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. He died on 19 Jun 1725 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. Richard married Elizabeth BILLINGS.

Other marriages:
KING, Sarah

He was Lieut. and a representative of Concord. His will, dated 1725, w. Elizabeth sole executrix.
Source: "History of Newton Massachusetts" by Francis Jackson Cambridge or Newton (same place)

Elizabeth BILLINGS was born in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. Elizabeth married Richard PARK.

Source: "History of Newton Massachusetts" by Francis Jackson

They had the following children.

  M i
Joseph PARK.

Source: "History of Newton Massachusetts" by Francis Jackson
  M ii
Josiah PARK.

Source: "History of Newton Massachusetts" by Francis Jackson
  M iii
Jonathan PARK.

Source: "History of Newton Massachusetts" by Francis Jackson
  M iv
Isaac PARK.

Source: "History of Newton Massachusetts" by Francis Jackson
  M v
Ephraim PARK.

Source: "History of Newton Massachusetts" by Francis Jackson
  F vi
Elizabeth PARK.

Source: "History of Newton Massachusetts" by Francis Jackson
  F vii
Sarah PARK.

Source: "History of Newton Massachusetts" by Francis Jackson
  F viii
Rebecca PARK.

Source: "History of Newton Massachusetts" by Francis Jackson
  M ix
Daniel PARK.

Source: "History of Newton Massachusetts" by Francis Jackson
  M x
Zacheus PARK.

Source: "History of Newton Massachusetts" by Francis Jackson

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