Ancestors of Tim Farr and Descendants of Stephen Farr Sr. of Concord, Massachusetts and Lidlington, Bedfordshire, England


Elisha BISBY. Elisha married Sarah KING.

Sarah KING [Parents] 1 was born 2 on 26 May 1650 in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States. Sarah married Elisha BISBY.


Nicholas CLAPP [Parents] [scrapbook] 1, 2 was born 3 about 1575 in Sidbury, Devonshire, England, United Kingdom. He died 4 on 14 Mar 1631 in Venn Ottery, Devonshire, England, United Kingdom. Nicholas married 5 Elizabeth PILE in 1603 in Sidbury, Devonshire, England, United Kingdom.

2. NICHOLAS2 CLAP (Widow Christian ) was presumably born in Sidbury about the year 1575. He was living there in 1608 when he proved the will of his mother. The last years of his life were spent, however, in the neighboring parish of Venn Ottery, co. Devon. His wife, Elizabeth , mentioned in the will of her mother-in-law in 1608, he probably married about 1603. He was buried in Venn Ottery on March 14, 1631, and his wife survived him only ten days, being buried on March 24, 1631.

The will of Nicholas Clapp of Yenotry in the County of Devon was made on his death-bed March 12, 1631, and proved on March 29, 1631. He gave to the poor people of the parish of Sidbury l0s. and to the poor of Venotry 3s. 4d. To Jane Clapp, Thomas Clapp, Barbara Clapp, Radagond Clapp, John and Ambrose Clapp, his children, fourscore pounds each from the profits of his lands and tenements in Venotry, to be paid at the rate of nineteen pounds a year. If any child died before time of payment, his share to be equally divided amongst the others. He made arrangements for prepayment if any of the four youngest children "shall be willing to putt themselves to any arte or trade." To Elizabeth, his wife, a feather-bed performed (i.e. furnished), six pewter dishes, potts and a middle pan of brass, a chest, two coffers and the use of other household stuff for her life. To son Thomas, his third best pot of brass. To each

Clapp, of Scituate   89

of his daughters Jane, Barbara and Redagon, a brazen ;panu To his son Nicholas Clapp, a pewter dish. Residue to Richiard Clapp, his eldest son and heir, to whom he gave his lands., and tenements in Venotry. Executor: son Richard Clapp. Overseers : his sons-in-law Francis Pile and Hercules Searles, to each of whom 21s. Witnesses: Nic Putt, Wm Winter, Christopher Whitmore.

CLAPP FAMILY.
Communicated by J. Henry Lea, Esq., of Cedarhurst, Fairhaven, Mass.

The following notes, taken by the writer from the Registers of the Prerogative Court of Canterbury at Somerset House in London, during a somewhat prolonged residence in that city while engaged in genealogical Investigations regarding his own, and other families, may not be without interest to those who are connected with the New England Clapps, as tending to throw some light on the hitherto unknown ancestry of that family in England.

These extracts are only fragmentary, no search of the Calendars for the name having been attempted, and it seems highly probable that an exhaustive examination of these valuable records may result in the solution of the mystery now surrounding the origin of the family and the connection of its various emigrants to this country. The John Clapp of Clehydon does not seem to be identical with the brother of Capt. Roger of that name, but "Colyton" or "Culllton," now Collaton, where he resided, may readily be identified with "Clehydon" of the will, and he was no doubt a not distant kinsman. William Clapp the younger of Salcombe, named as Overseer in the will of John Clapp of Otterton, may have been the unknown father of Capt Roger who was certainly living there at that time. A thorough search of the Prerogative Court Calendars and also of those of the District Courts of Devon and Dorset, none of which ever seem to have been undertaken, would no doubt furnish the whole history of this most interesting family.

Elizabeth PILE was born 1 about 1580 in of Sidbury, Devonshire, England, United Kingdom. She died 2 on 14 Mar 1631 in Venn Ottery, Devonshire, England, United Kingdom. Elizabeth married 3 Nicholas CLAPP in 1603 in Sidbury, Devonshire, England, United Kingdom.

They had the following children.

  F i daughter CLAPP.
  F ii daughter CLAPP.
  M iii Richard CLAPP was born about 1605.
  F iv Prudence CLAPP was born about 1606. She died in BET 1640 AND 1646.
  F v Jane CLAPP was born about 1610. She died before 1655.
  M vi Deacon Thomas CLAPP was born in 1609. He died on 20 Apr 1684.
  M vii Nicholas CLAPP was born in 1612. He died on 24 Nov 1679.
  F viii Barbara CLAPP was born about 1614. She died on 15 Apr 1655.
  F ix Radigon CLAPP was christened on 7 May 1609. She died on 10 Dec 1645.
  M x John CLAPP was born about 1616. He died on 24 Jul 1655.
  M xi
Ambrose CLAPP 1 was born 2 about 1618 in England, United Kingdom. He died 3 after 1655 in England, United Kingdom.

Deacon Thomas CLAPP [Parents] [scrapbook] 1, 2 was born 3 in 1609 in Sidbury, Devonshire, England, United Kingdom. He died 4, 5 on 20 Apr 1684 in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States. Thomas married 6, 7, 8 Abigail WRIGHT after Jan 1655 in Weymouth, Norfolk, Massachusetts, United States.

Other marriages:
, Jane

3. THOMAS2 CLAPP (Nicholas,2 Widow Christian1) was presumably born in Sidbury, co. Devon, about 1609. In 1678 he testified that his age was "about 69 yeares." In 1630 his kinsman Roger Clapp of the neighboring parish of Salcombe Regis, co. Devon, went to New England, the forerunner of a large group of family emigrants. About the first of May in 1633 a ship left the port of Weymouth for the voyage to America. Governor Winthrop recorded that she arrived at Boston on July 24, "with about 80 passengers and 12 kine, who sate down at Dorchester. They were 12 weeks coming, being forced into
Dean and Chapter of Exeter.

† The Clapp Memorial, by Ebenezer Clapp. Boston. 1876, contains a vast amount of genealogical and biographical material about the Clapp emigrants and their descendants. It must be used with discrimination, however. All genealogies contain errors of fact and of judgment, but quite naturally this is particularly the case with publications of an early date.

90   The Ancestry of Joseph Neal

the Western Islands by a leak, where they stayed three weeks and were very courteously used by the Portugals." Weymouth was the convenient port for east Devon and it is reasonably supposd that among the voyagers who enjoyed an unexpected stay in the Azores were Thomas Clapp, his brother Nicholas, and his sisters Barbara; Redigon and Prudence, the latter the wife of their kinsman Edward Clapp, all of whom were soon afterward in Dorchester, where Roger Clapp had settled. Their younger brother John followed them a few years later.

Thomas Clapp's name appears on the Dorchester records in 1634, and in 1638 he was a freeman of the town. By 1639 he had moved on to Weymouth but his stay there was a short one. Wcymouth was in the throes of theological controversy. The local parson, Mr. Lenthal, believed that all baptized persons should be admitted to the church without further trial. For this liberal heresy he was called to account by government and retracted, but one of his chief adherents, Richard Silvester, was steadfast and, on being disenfranchised, moved to Scituate in the more tolerant colony of Plymouth. Thomas Clapp was one of a group of Weymouth men, including Thomas Rawlins, James Torrey and William Holbrook, who left Weymouth for Scituate at about the same time, and possibly for similar reasons.

In Scituate Clapp was propounded freeman on June 6, 1644, and admitted , June 4, 1645, and the latter year he served as constable. He purchased a farm of twenty-four acres from Mr. Timothy Hatherly in 1645. Uniting with the first church he became its deacon in 1647 and remained loyal to Rev. Charles Chauncey, his pastor and the future president of Harvard College, when a large portion of the congregation abandoned him to form a second parish where infant baptism, disapproved of by Mr. Chauncey, could be practiced. Happily Clapp lived to be a member of the committee of reconcilement which reunited the parishes in 1675 in a somewhat less controversial age. He was Scituate's deputy to the Plymouth General Court in 1649, and the town s overseer of the poor, the first appointed, in 1667.

It is probable that Thomas Clapp was married three times, the names of the first two wives being unknown. His third wife was Abigail (Wright), widow of Robert Sharp of Muddy River. Sharp died in 1655. After Clapp s death she married Capt. William Holbrook of Scituate. When Clapp's son Eleazer died in 1676 the papers dealing with the probate of his estate indicate

Clapp, of Scituate 91

that his only heirs by intestacy were his brothers Thomas and -Samuel. As. brothers and sisters of the half-blood did.. not in- -bent under the common law we can therefore say with certainty that Thomas, Samuel and Eleazer Clapp were sons of one moth-~ er, their father's first wife. The two children of- the third wife, Abigail, are duly recorded in the vital records of Scituate. This leaves three children, Increase, Prudence and Elizabeth, all mentioned in their father's will, who are with strong probability to be assigned to an unknown second wife.

Deacon Clapp died in Scituate April 20, 1684. His will, made the day before his death, was proved June 4, 1684. He states that he is "in ye 87 yeer of my age," but this is an exaggeration or an error of ten years. To his wife Abigail he left the use and profits of all his houses and lands and his orchard for life, with strict injunction against waste, also £10 in silver in the hands of his son Samuel Clapp, also two feather beds and their furnishings, the best brass kettle, a skillet, an iron kettle, an iron pot, two pewter basins, four pewter platters, six napkins, a table-cloth, twelve trenchers, a long chest, two boxes and as many other small things as she desired up to the value of 30s. She was to have three cows, six sheep and a horse, which after her decease were to be divided among her children. To his son Thomas Clapp, all his apparell, both linen and woolen, his shoes, stockings and hats, and a double portion of the lands after Abigail Clapp s death. To his son Samuel Clapp, two committee lots and a single portion of the lands. To his son Increase Clapp, two young cattle and a single portion of the lands. To his daughter Elizabeth King, £7, the best brass pan, a bed and its furniture and a single portion of the lands. To his daughter Prudence Clapp, two cows, the second brass pan, a feather bed and its furniture, £7 in movables and a single portion of the lands, and she to have her residence in his house until his wife s death. To his daughter Abigail Clapp, £5, two cows and a single portion of the lands. To his daughter Mary Tilden,* three sheep and two lambs. To his grandchild Elizabeth, a sheep and a lamb. Executors: sons Thomas Clapp and Samuel Clapp. Appraisers appointed in the will: friends John Briggs, Nathaniel Tilden, John Buck, Sr. Witnesses: John Wetherehl, Israel Turner. The inventory contained property valued at £351.t

* This was Mary (Sharp), wife of Nathaniel Tilden and daughter of Abigail (Wright) (Sharp) Clapp by her former marriage.
† Plymouth County Probate, 4(2): 129, 133, 134.

Thomas Clapp, immigrant, born in Dorchester, England, 1597 was son of Richard Clap of Dorchester, and brother of Nicholas Clapp, an immigrant settler of Dorchester, Massachusetts Bay Colony, known to genealogists as"Nicholas of Dorchester." These two brothers were cousins of Edward and Roger Clapp, sons of William Clap, the younger, of Salcombe-Regis, Devonshire, England, and this gives us Richard Clap of Dorchester England, and William Clap, the elder of Salcombe, England, as brothers.  The name is probably of Norse origin, if we take it to be derived from Clapa, as Osgood Clapa, a famous Danish nobleman, was a prime favorite of Hardacanute, an early English king; or it may be a cognate form of some ancient gothic word, as we find the German name Klapp of frequent occurrence. ----

Thomas Clapp, the immigrant, arrived in Boston, July 24, 1633, probably on the ship which arrived from Weymouth, England, that date. He was probably accompanied by his brother Nicholas and cousin Edward. Another brother, John, arrived much later.  Thomas removed to Dorchester in 1634, and became a freeman of the town and of the colony 1638, and the same year removed to Weymouth, a town of recent establishment, having been set apart by the general court out of the plantation of Wessaguscas, September 2, 1635.  He appears to have tarried in the new town but a short time, ---He appears in the town of Scituate, as a deacon in the First Church, 1647, and as deputy in the general court 1649, and when the town meeting petitioned the general court for an officer to take care of the poor of the town he was made overseer in 1667--the first record we have of an "overseer of the poor" as a town officer in Scituate.  He had grants of land in Hingham, but may not have resided there.  He went to Weymouth and thence to Scituate.  He appears to have been Scituate as early as 1640.  As deacon of the First Church, over which Rev.  Charles Chauncey was minister (1641-53, he was a witness of the difficulties that beset the pastor and parishioners of the church that led to its division at the establishment of the Second Church.  Previous to his leaving Massachusetts Bay Colony he appears to have been a disciple of Richard Sylvester and of Mr. Lenthail, the minister who advocated the admitting of any baptized person to membership in the church without further examination, and Thomas Rawlins, James Torrey and William Holbrook went: with Richard Sylvester to Plymouth Colony, settling in Scituate about the same time Thomas Clapp removed to that town, and it is probable the question of baptism moved all these men to seek freedom in the Pilgrim Colony. (It appears that there was a 30 year controversy between the First and Second Churches in Scituate) and in 1675, Thomas was selected one of three members of a committee from the First Church appointed in 1673 to carry a letter containing news of reconciliation to the Second Church, so long desired by the peaceloving of both congregations.  His sister Prudence married her cousin Edward Clapp.  The family name of his wife Abigail is not known.  He died in Scituate, April 20, 1684, greatly respected, a useful and enterprising man blessed with a good wife, eight children and length of days, having attained the ninety-seventh year of his age. The children of Thomas and Abigail Clapp were: Thomas, born in Weymouth, March 15, 1639; Increase, Samuel, Eleazer, Elizabeth, Prudence, John and Aigail, all born in Scituate.  Elizabeth, our grandmother, married Thomas King (Jr).

Abigail WRIGHT was born 1 in 1623 in of Dorchester, Dorset, England, United Kingdom. She died 2 before 13 Feb 1707/1708 in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States. Abigail married 3, 4, 5 Deacon Thomas CLAPP after Jan 1655 in Weymouth, Norfolk, Massachusetts, United States.

Marriage Notes:

MARRIAGE: From birth of first child.

They had the following children.

  M i
John CLAPP was born 1 on 18 Oct 1658 in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States. He died 2 in 1671 in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States.

DEATH: died "the pious child" aged a "little more than thirteen"
  F ii Abigail CLAPP was born on 29 Jan 1659/1660. She died on 2 Feb 1736.

Thomas CLAPP [Parents] was born 1 on 15 Mar 1639 in Weymouth, Norfolk, Massachusetts, United States. He died in 1690/1691 in Dedham, Norfolk, Massachusetts, United States. Thomas married 2 Mary FISHER on 10 Nov 1662.

Mary FISHER was born 1 on 23 Mar 1643/1644 in Dedham, Norfolk, Massachusetts, United States. Mary married 2 Thomas CLAPP on 10 Nov 1662.


Increase CLAPP [Parents] was christened on 14 May 1640 in Dorchester, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States. Increase married 1, 2, 3 Elizabeth BURSELY in Oct 1675 in Barnstable, Massachusetts, United States.

BARNSTABLE, MASS., VITAL RECORDS.
[Vol.1, p. 404] Increase Clap & Elizabeth Goodspeed ye vid: of Nathll Goodspeed Married In Octor 1675

Elizabeth BURSELY. Elizabeth married 1, 2, 3 Increase CLAPP in Oct 1675 in Barnstable, Massachusetts, United States.

BARNSTABLE, MASS., VITAL RECORDS.
[Vol.1, p. 404] Increase Clap & Elizabeth Goodspeed ye vid: of Nathll Goodspeed Married In Octor 1675


Samuel CLAPP [Parents] was born 1 about 1641. Samuel married 2, 3 Hanna GILL on 14 Jun 1666 in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States.

Samuel's will was probated 4 on 14 Apr 1733 in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States.

Hanna GILL. Hanna married 1, 2 Samuel CLAPP on 14 Jun 1666 in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States.


Stephen TILDEN was born 1 on 14 May 1659 in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States. He died 2 on 2 Nov 1732 in Marshfield, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States. Stephen married 3, 4 Abigail CLAPP in 1685 in of Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States.

Abigail CLAPP [Parents] was born 1, 2 on 29 Jan 1659/1660 in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States. She died 3 on 2 Feb 1736 in Marshfield, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States. Abigail married 4, 5 Stephen TILDEN in 1685 in of Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States.


Robert CUTLER [scrapbook] was born in 1553 in Ipswich, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom. He died on 7 Nov 1625 in England, United Kingdom. Robert married Alice GARDNER on 13 Jan 1578 in England, United Kingdom.

Alice GARDNER was born in 1559 in Sproughton, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom. She died on 11 Oct 1631 in Sproughton, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom. Alice married Robert CUTLER on 13 Jan 1578 in England, United Kingdom.

They had the following children.

  M i Thomas CUTLER was born on 7 Nov 1578. He died on 3 Jul 1640.
  M ii
Samuel CUTLER was born in 1580 in Ipswich, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom. He was christened on 17 Feb 1590 in St Nicholas, Ipswich, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom.
  F iii
Alice CUTLER was christened on 16 Apr 1583 in St Nicholas, Ipswich, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom.

Given name may be Alis
  F iv
Mary CUTLER was christened on 8 Jul 1585 in St Nicholas, Ipswich, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom.
  F v
Elizabeth CUTLER was christened on 30 Jul 1586 in St Nicholas, Ipswich, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom.
  M vi
Robte CUTLER was christened on 10 Nov 1588 in St Nicholas, Ipswich, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom.
  M vii
William CUTLER was christened on 2 May 1591 in St Nicholas, Ipswich, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom. He died before 1621.
  M viii
Beniamyn CUTLER was christened on 2 Oct 1592 in St Nicholas, Ipswich, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom. He died on 18 Jun 1664.
  M ix
Robert CUTLER was born in 1594 in Ipswich, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom.
  F x
Ann CUTLER was born in 1596 in Ipswich, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom.
  M xi
John CUTLER was born in 1598 in Ipswich, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom.
  M xii
Rodger CUTLER was born in 1599 in Ipswich, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom. He died in 1632.
  M xiii
Edward CUTLER was christened on 3 May 1600 in St Nicholas, Ipswich, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom.

Thomas DOUNDY was born in 1553 in England, United Kingdom. Thomas married Anne FASTOLFE.

Anne FASTOLFE was born in 1558 in England, United Kingdom. Anne married Thomas DOUNDY.

They had the following children.

  F i Anne DOUNDY was born in 1582/1583. She died on 19 Aug 1613.

John CUTLER [Parents] [scrapbook] was born in 1600 in Spauston, Norfolk, England, United Kingdom. He died on 24 Feb 1637 in Hingham, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States. John married Mary in 1620 in England, United Kingdom.

Mary. Mary married John CUTLER in 1620 in England, United Kingdom.

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