Ancestors of Tim Farr and The Descendants of Stephen Farr


George Albert GRANT was born 1 on 17 Feb 1891 in New Harmony, Washington, Utah, United States. He died 2 on 16 Jan 1965. He was buried 3 on 19 Jan 1965 in New Harmony, Washington, Utah, United States. George married 4 Clara Naomi FARR on 23 Dec 1912 in Richfield, Sevier, Utah, United States.

Clara Naomi FARR [Parents] [scrapbook] was born 1 on 10 Jan 1896 in Salem, Utah, Utah, United States. She died 2 on 10 Oct 1974 in Cedar City, Iron, Utah, United States. She was buried 3 in Oct 1974 in New Harmony, Washington, Utah, United States. Clara married 4 George Albert GRANT on 23 Dec 1912 in Richfield, Sevier, Utah, United States.

Clara was counted in a census 5 in 1900 in Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah, United States.


Bernell Franklin FARR [Parents] was born 1 on 25 Aug 1928 in Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, United States. He died 2 on 27 Apr 1978 in Anaheim, Orange, California, United States. Bernell married 3 Roberta Marie HALL on 6 Jan 1954 in Los Angeles, California, United States.

Bernell was counted in a census 4 in 1930 in Montebello, Los Angeles, California, United States.

Roberta Marie HALL was born on 15 Aug 1931 in Almeria, Loup, Nebraska, United States. She died on 11 Mar 2009. Roberta married 1 Bernell Franklin FARR on 6 Jan 1954 in Los Angeles, California, United States.


Clarence L. FROST.

Violet LOO was born 1 on 21 Jun 1908. She died 2, 3 on 5 Aug 2003 in Beaverton, Washington, Oregon, United States. Violet married 4 Clarence L. FROST on 26 Sep 1929 in Sidney, Richland, Montana, United States.

Other marriages:
FARR, Leon Ancil


Lewis W. FLORMAN was born 1 on 23 Apr 1901. He died 2 on 19 Nov 1978 in Grand Rapids, Kent, Michigan, United States. Lewis married 3 Margaret Farr AVERY on 14 Jun 1930 in Cook, Illinois, United States.

Margaret Farr AVERY [Parents] was born on 24 Oct 1906 in Illinois, United States. She died 1 on 2 Dec 2005 in Muskegon, Muskegon, Michigan, United States. Margaret married 2 Lewis W. FLORMAN on 14 Jun 1930 in Cook, Illinois, United States.

Margaret was counted in a census 3 in 1910 in Chicago, Cook, Illinois, United States.


David Norris TWEEDY was born 1 on 3 Feb 1859 in Edgar, Edgar, Illinois, United States. He died 2 on 29 Jan 1937 in Salina, Saline, Kansas, United States. David married 3, 4 Sarah FARR on 17 Feb 1897 in Elmendaro Township, Lyon, Kansas, United States.

Sarah FARR [Parents] [scrapbook] 1 was born 2 on 12 Aug 1872 in Jefferson, Scotland, Missouri, United States. She died 3 on 14 Jan 1950 in Salina, Saline, Kansas, United States. Sarah married 4, 5 David Norris TWEEDY on 17 Feb 1897 in Elmendaro Township, Lyon, Kansas, United States.

Sarah was counted in a census 6 in 1880 in Jefferson, Scotland, Missouri, United States. She was counted in a census 7 in 1940 in Salina, Saline, Kansas, United States.


Daniel Logan FARR [Parents] [scrapbook] 1 was born 2, 3, 4 on 14 May 1874 in Jefferson, Scotland, Missouri, United States. He died 5 on 5 Jan 1950 in Lyon, Kansas, United States. Daniel married Della Ann BARB on 25 Sep 1900 in Emporia, Lyon, Kansas, United States.

Daniel was counted in a census 6 on 1 Jun 1900 in Center Township, Lyon, Kansas, United States.

Danial Logan Farr came with his parents from Missouri at the age of 18 and lived in the Hartford and Olpe area. He was the son of Nathan and Nancy Ann Stierwalt Farr.  His brothers were Hannibal, Jeff, Otis,  and Lester and his sisters were Lucetta, Sarah, and Melissa. He was  married to Della Barb who also came from Missouri and they farmed in  the Emporia, Olpe, and Madison areas.  


The Emporia Weekly Gazette, Thursday, January 12, 1950:

Daniel Logan Farr Dead
Daniel Logan Farr, retired farmer and stockman, died this morning at 10 o’clock at his home 617 Sherman. He was born in Missouri, May 14, 1874, the son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Farr. He and Della Barb were married September 23, 1900. He is survived by his wife of the home, two sons, Merle Farr Route 4, Emporia; Fred Farr of Boulder, Colorado; three daughters, Mrs. Sylvia Marlar of Madison; Mrs. Della Rose Rogers of Ontario, California; Miss Violet Farr of The home’ one brother, Jeff Farr of Emporia; two sisters, Mrs. Melissa Toler of Emporia; Mrs. Sarah Tweedy of Salina; four Granddaughters; five grandsons; and one great-grand child.

Della Ann BARB was born on 25 Sep 1878 in Mount Moriah, Harrison, Missouri, United States. She died on 21 Feb 1965 in Emporia, Lyon, Kansas, United States. Della married Daniel Logan FARR on 25 Sep 1900 in Emporia, Lyon, Kansas, United States.

Was listed as "divorced" in the 1900 Census taken on June 5, 1900.

Della is listed as nearest relative with the same address as Daniel on his WWI draft registration card.

They had the following children.

  M i Murl Barb FARR was born on 22 May 1901. He died on 28 Nov 1973.
  M ii Fred Willard FARR was born on 3 May 1903. He died on 14 Oct 1976.
  F iii Sylvia FARR was born on 27 Dec 1906. She died on 31 Jan 2000.
  F iv
Nancy Violet FARR [scrapbook] was born 1, 2 on 17 Apr 1909 in Kansas, United States. She died 3, 4 on 2 Apr 1991 in Emporia, Lyon, Kansas, United States.

Nancy was counted in a census 5 in 1925 in Eureka, Greenwood, Kansas, United States. She was counted in a census 6 in 1940 in Madison, Greenwood, Kansas, United States.



Newspaper: Wichita Eagle, The
Date of Publication: April 3, 1991
Page: 2D

N. Violet Farr, 81, retired teacher, died Tuesday. April 2, 1991. Service 1:30 p.m. Saturday, First United Methodist Church.

Survivors: sisters, Sylvia Marlar of Hamilton, Della Rose Rogers of Emporia. Memorials have been established with First United Methodist Church and Newman Hospital Auxiliary. Roberts-Blue-Barnett Funeral Home.
Garden City
  F v Della Rose FARR was born on 7 Dec 1911. She died on 25 Feb 1998.

Lora Dennis "Laurie" FARR [Parents] [scrapbook] 1 was born 2 on 9 Dec 1876 in Jefferson, Scotland, Missouri, United States. He died 3 on 5 Jun 1925 in Emporia, Lyon, Kansas, United States. Laurie married Clara Belle MAGATHAN on 23 Mar 1912 in Emporia, Lyon, Kansas, United States.

Laurie was counted in a census 4 in 1900 in Center Township, Lyon, Kansas, United States.

Is found in some records as "Laurie".

The Emporia Weekly Gazette  Thursday, June 11, 1925

Lora Farr Dead

Lora Farr who lived 1 mile north of town, died late Thursday night at Newman Memorial County hospital of septic poisoning as a result of an accident in which he sustained a smashed finger about 2 weeks ago.  He had been in the hospital since Monday.

Mr. Farr was born in Missouri in 1877, and came to Lyon county in 1892, when he was 15 years of age, and has lived near Emporia ever since.

He was married to Clara Magathan in Emporia in 1912, and is survived by his wife and three children, Lowell, 12, Dorothy, 11, and Norma Jean, 2.  He is also survived by three sisters, Mrs. David Tweedy of Salina; Mrs. Gene Toler of Parsons; and Mrs. John Denhamm, of Bethany, Mo.; and four brothers, Jefferson Farr; Hartford; Logan Farr, Madison; Lester Farr, Bethany, Mo., and Hannibal Farr, Locust Grove, Okla.

Funeral services will be held Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the Friends Church.  Reverend H. G. Biddleman will conduct the services assisted by Reverend John Summer.

Interment will be in Maplewood Cemetery.

Clara Belle MAGATHAN [scrapbook] was born 1 on 28 Oct 1890 in Kansas, United States. She died 2 on 26 Nov 1962 in Emporia, Lyon, Kansas, United States. Clara married Lora Dennis FARR "Laurie" on 23 Mar 1912 in Emporia, Lyon, Kansas, United States.

Clara was counted in a census 3 in 1910 in Fremont Township, Lyon, Kansas, United States. She was counted in a census 4 in 1930 in Toledo, Chase, Kansas, United States. She was counted in a census 5 in 1940 in Emporia, Lyon, Kansas, United States.

Other marriages:
JONES, Jake Jeremiah

Listed in the 1930 US Census as "Clara B Bulthuis". No Husband listed, just her two daughters Dorothy M Farr and Norma J Farr and her son C Lowell Farr.

Listed in the 1940 US Census as "Clara Jones" with Jake Jones head of household and daughter Norma Jean Farr.

They had the following children.

  M i Charles Lowell FARR was born on 25 Jan 1913. He died on 21 Dec 1968.
  F ii Dorothy Mae FARR was born on 15 Mar 1914. She died on 12 Sep 2010.
  M iii Wheeler FARR.
  M iv Woolworth FARR.
  F v Norma Jean FARR was born on 6 Jul 1923. She died on 17 Jun 1991.

Carl Eugene TOLER [scrapbook] was born 1 on 18 Feb 1878 in Kansas City, Jackson, Missouri, United States. He died 2 on 24 Feb 1936 in Kansas, United States. Carl married Melissa A. FARR on 23 Dec 1900 in Emporia, Lyon, Kansas, United States.

Melissa A. FARR [Parents] [scrapbook] 1 was born 2 on 6 Feb 1879 in Jefferson, Scotland, Missouri, United States. She died 3 on 30 Mar 1950 in Kansas, United States. Melissa married Carl Eugene TOLER on 23 Dec 1900 in Emporia, Lyon, Kansas, United States.

Melissa was counted in a census 4 on 1 Jun 1900 in Center Township, Lyon, Kansas, United States.


Heber Erastus FARR [Parents] [scrapbook] 1 was born 2 on 16 Aug 1875 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. He was christened on 24 Aug 1875 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. He died 3 on 6 Jun 1965 in Provo, Utah, Utah, United States. He was buried on 9 Jun 1965 in Pleasant Grove, Utah, Utah, United States. Heber married Amanda Elizabeth WILLIAMS on 25 Dec 1893 in Colonia Dublán, Chihuahua, Mexico.

Other marriages:
BLUTH, Rosemilda Ranghilda (Hilda)

Heber was born in a log cabin on Main Street (now Washington Blvd.) and 20th Street on a Monday morning at 3:40 a.m.

 ORDN DATE 17 AUG 1891
 ORDN PLAC Colonia Dublan, Chihuahua, Mexico
 ORDN NOTE Ordained a deacon by Apostle George Teasdale, Winslow Farr, Jr., Frederick G. Williams II, and Philip H. Hurst.
 ORDN DATE 11 FEB 1893
 ORDN PLAC Colonia Dublan, Chihuahua, Mexico
 ORDN NOTE Ordained a Priest under the hands of Joseph Wright, Frederick G. Williams II, and Harry M. Payne.
 ORDN DATE 4 MAR 1894
 ORDN PLAC Colonia Dublan, Chihuahua, Mexico
 ORDN NOTE Ordained an Elder under the hands of Apostle John Henry Smith and Bishop Winslow Farr, Jr.
 ORDN DATE 18 DEC 1895
 ORDN PLAC Colonia Dublan, Chihuahua, Mexico
 ORDN NOTE Ordained a Seventy of the 99th Quorum by Edward Stevenson who was ordained by Joseph Young who was ordained by Joseph Smith who was ordained by Peter, James and John.  (Heber's priesthood line of authority.)
 EVEN TYPE Mission
 EVEN DATE BET 1897 AND 1899
 EVEN PLAC Eastern States Mission (Pennsylvania)
 EVEN NOTE Dates are approximate.
 OCCU Cutting ice from the ice pond DATE 1887  OCCU Cutting ice from the ice pond PLAC Ogden, Weber, Utah  NOTE One time Heber fell into the ice pond.  When his rescuers got him out, his clothes were frozen, and so they had to stand him in the back of the truck, drove him the mile to home, where his mother had to pull off his clothes.  In the summer he worked on the ice wagon delivering ice to customers.
 RESI Colonia Dublan, Mexico DATE 1890
 RESI Colonia Dublan, Mexico NOTE Heber moved with his father and mother and siblings from Ogden to Mexico in 1890 rather than suffer his father's imprisonment again for polygamy.  They traveled by train to Deming, New Mexico, where they reassembled the covered wagons, which they had previously disassembled and took with them on the train.  The family had to live the first year in Colonia Diaz because the river was too high to cross.  NOTE Heber moved with his father and mother and siblings from Ogden to (Colonia Diaz was completely leveled during the Mexican Revolution of 1912.  There is nothing left of it.)  The next summer they moved to Colonia Dublan, about 50 miles further south. They pitched their tents on a prairie of dry grass about two miles from the river where they had to go to get water until they could dig wells.  They bought two terrenos (lots or plots of land) from a Mexican. l; They moved on the land, cleared it, plowed, planted and set out an orchard.  They hired some Mexicans to make adobes, and then built them a house.  Heber was chosen President of the Deacons quorum, then President of the Mutual.  These were his first Church positions.

Binghampton, Arizona DATE 1909  NOTE  The Farrs, along with several other families, moved from Mexico to a small settlement near Tucson, Arizona, in December of 1909.  By this time, Heber and Lizzy had seven children, and Heber had taken a second wife who also had several small children.  Plans had been made earlier with President Joseph Robinson, President of the California Mission, to visit.  On Saturday morning, May 21, 1910, Heber Farr and his uncle, Nephi Bingham, met the train from Salt Lake and California to get George Albert Smith, Joseph W. McMurrin and President Joseph E. Robinson.

The following Sunday afternoon, May 22, 1910, the first branch of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints was organized in the shade at the east of the Bingham  home.  The opening prayer was given by President Joseph E. Robinson.  The new branch was called "Binghampton Branch" after Uncle Nephi Bingham.  There was already a little town in Arizona by the name of Bingham.  Heber Farr was ordained Branch President, Fredrick Granger Williams (Lizzy's father), first counselor and Frank Webb, second counselor.  The sacrament was passed, talks were given, and the closing prayer was given by Joseph A. Farr.

Church services were held that summer under the shade trees by Heber and Joseph Farr's homes.  Uncle Nephi Bingham was county trustee of the Davidson School District.  He received permission to have a large school house built as more Saints and relatives were moving out of Mexico.  By Sept. 1910, the school house was built and by adding the little school house to the south end of the new building there was room for a stage and two class rooms more.

Uncle Nephi got permission to hold Church services in the school house.  At that time the Sunday School was organized.  Joseph A. Farr was ordained Superintendent of Sunday School, Elmer Cardon as 1st assistant, J. Alma Young as 2nd assistant, Ellen Bluth as secretary, and Clara Bingham as assistant secretary.  Heber O. Chlarson was set apart as Ward Clerk.  The next Sunday the Ladies' Relief Society was organized with Elizabeth Farr as president, May Bingham (Nephi's daughter) and Lindy Young (her sister) as her assistants and Hazel Williams (another sister) as secretary.  Later the Primary and Mutual were organized.  See "History of Binghampton" by Edna Bingham Sabin, in the possession of Sherrie Farr Dunford, Julie Farr Thomas, and other Farr family members.

 RESI Orem, Utah DATE 1926
 RESI Grandpa Bingham's place DATE 1888
 RESI Grandpa Bingham's place PLAC Huntsville, Weber, Utah

Heber spent a lot of time at Grandpa Bingham's, and while his father was in Southern Utah trying to escape the U.S. Marshals who wanted him imprisoned for polygamy, and during his father's imprisonment, Heber's mother, Melvina, took her six children (and one on the way) and went to live with her parents, Susan and Erastus Bingham in Huntsville.  It was here that Heber became well acquainted with future prophet and president David O. McKay, as they played and went to Primary and Sunday School.

Married by Bishop Winslow Farr, Jr., at the Frederick G. Williams II home in Colonia Dublan, Mexico. This sealing took place in Colonia Dublan, Chihuahua, Mexico by John Henry Smith.  Sealed again in Salt Lake 4 Oct 1899 when she took out her endowments.

SLGS NOTE This sealing took place in Colonia Dublan, Chihuahua, Mexico, and CONC occured before she was endowed.  Sealed by Anthony W. Ivans

Amanda Elizabeth WILLIAMS [scrapbook] 1 was born 2 on 23 Feb 1877 in Eden, Weber, Utah, United States. She was christened on 5 Apr 1877 in Eden, Weber, Utah, United States. She died 3 on 6 Apr 1964 in Provo, Utah, Utah, United States. She was buried on 9 Apr 1964 in Pleasant Grove, Utah, Utah, United States. Amanda married Heber Erastus FARR on 25 Dec 1893 in Colonia Dublán, Chihuahua, Mexico.

RESI Colonia Dublan, Mexico DATE 1890 to 1909  NOTE "Lizzy" moved with her father and mother and siblings from Eden, Utah, to Mexico in 1890 rather than suffer her father's imprisonment for polygamy.  They traveled by train to Deming, New Mexico, where they reassembled the covered wagons, which they had
previously disassembled and took with thim on the wagon.  They walked
the rest of the way, about 150 miles.  There is some heresay that she
lagged behind the wagon train a little bit so that she could hold hands with Heber Farr, whose family was also moving to Mexico.  They were married in Colonia Dublan three years later.
 RESI Binghampton, Arizona DATE 1909 to abt. 1931  NOTE  The Farrs, along with several other families, moved from Mexico to a small settlement near Tucson, Arizona, in December of 1909.  By this time, Heber and Lizzy had seven children, and Heber had taken a second wife who also had several small
children.  Plans had been made earlier with President Joseph Robinson, President of the California Mission, to visit.  On Saturday morning, May 21,
1910, Heber Farr and his uncle, Nephi Bingham, met the train from Salt Lake and California to get George Albert Smith, Joseph W. McMurrin and President Joseph E. Robinson.  The following Sunday afternoon, May 22, 1910, the first branch of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints was organized in the shade at the east of the Bingham  home.  The opening prayer was given by
President Joseph E. Robinson.  The new branch was called "Binghampton Branch" after Uncle Nephi Bingham.  There was already a little town in Arizona by the name of Bingham.  Heber Farr was ordained Branch President, Fredrick Granger Williams (Lizzy's father), first counselor and Frank Webb, second counselor.  The sacrament was passed, talks were given, and the closing prayer was given by Joseph A. Farr.  Church services were held that summer under the shade trees by Heber and Joseph Farr's homes.  Uncle Nephi Bingham was county trustee of the Davidson School District.  He received permission to have a large school house built as more Saints and relatives were moving out of
Mexico.  By Sept. 1910, the school house was built and by adding the little school house to the south end of the new building there was room for a stage and two class rooms more.  Uncle Nephi got permission to hold Church services in the school house.  At that time the Sunday School was organized.  Joseph A. Farr was ordained Superintendent of Sunday School, Elmer Cardon as 1st
assistant, J. Alma Young as 2nd assistant, Ellen Bluth as secretary, and Clara Bingham as assistant secretary.  Heber O. Chlarson was set apart as Ward Clerk.  The next Sunday the Ladies' Relief Society was organized with
Elizabeth Farr as president, May Bingham (Nephi's daughter) and Lindy Young (her sister) as her assistants and Hazel Williams (another sister) as secretary.  Later the Primary and Mutual were organized.
              See "History of Binghampton" by Edna Bingham Sabin, in the possession of Sherrie Farr Dunford, Julie Farr Thomas, and other Farr family members.RESI Colonia Dublan, Mexico DATE 1890 to 1909  NOTE "Lizzy" moved with her father and mother and siblings from Eden, Utah, to Mexico in 1890 rather than suffer her father's imprisonment for polygamy.  They traveled by train to Deming, New Mexico, where they reassembled the covered wagons, which they had
previously disassembled and took with thim on the wagon.  They walked
the rest of the way, about 150 miles.  There is some heresay that she
lagged behind the wagon train a little bit so that she could hold hands with Heber Farr, whose family was also moving to Mexico.  They were married in Colonia Dublan three years later.
 RESI Binghampton, Arizona DATE 1909 to abt. 1931  NOTE  The Farrs, along with several other families, moved from Mexico to a small settlement near Tucson, Arizona, in December of 1909.  By this time, Heber and Lizzy had seven children, and Heber had taken a second wife who also had several small
children.  Plans had been made earlier with President Joseph Robinson, President of the California Mission, to visit.  On Saturday morning, May 21,
1910, Heber Farr and his uncle, Nephi Bingham, met the train from Salt Lake and California to get George Albert Smith, Joseph W. McMurrin and President Joseph E. Robinson.  The following Sunday afternoon, May 22, 1910, the first branch of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints was organized in the shade at the east of the Bingham  home.  The opening prayer was given by
President Joseph E. Robinson.  The new branch was called "Binghampton Branch" after Uncle Nephi Bingham.  There was already a little town in Arizona by the name of Bingham.  Heber Farr was ordained Branch President, Fredrick Granger Williams (Lizzy's father), first counselor and Frank Webb, second counselor.  The sacrament was passed, talks were given, and the closing prayer was given by Joseph A. Farr.  Church services were held that summer under the shade trees by Heber and Joseph Farr's homes.  Uncle Nephi Bingham was county trustee of the Davidson School District.  He received permission to have a large school house built as more Saints and relatives were moving out of
Mexico.  By Sept. 1910, the school house was built and by adding the little school house to the south end of the new building there was room for a stage and two class rooms more.  Uncle Nephi got permission to hold Church services in the school house.  At that time the Sunday School was organized.  Joseph A. Farr was ordained Superintendent of Sunday School, Elmer Cardon as 1st
assistant, J. Alma Young as 2nd assistant, Ellen Bluth as secretary, and Clara Bingham as assistant secretary.  Heber O. Chlarson was set apart as Ward Clerk.  The next Sunday the Ladies' Relief Society was organized with
Elizabeth Farr as president, May Bingham (Nephi's daughter) and Lindy Young (her sister) as her assistants and Hazel Williams (another sister) as secretary.  Later the Primary and Mutual were organized.
              See "History of Binghampton" by Edna Bingham Sabin, in the possession of Sherrie Farr Dunford, Julie Farr Thomas, and other Farr family members.

Marriage Notes:

Originally sealed in Mexico by John Henry Smith.  Sealed in Salt Lake Temple on 4 Oct 1899

They had the following children.

  F i Lula Amanda FARR was born on 28 Mar 1895. She died on 9 Feb 1920.
  M ii
Heber Vernon FARR 1 was born on 20 Dec 1896 in Colonia Dublán, Chihuahua, Mexico. He died on 30 Dec 1896 in Colonia Dublán, Chihuahua, Mexico. He was buried in Colonia Dublán, Chihuahua, Mexico.



Since this baby died before the Mexican Revolution of 1912 and following, and the records of the Dublan Cemetery were destroyed during the Revolution, there is no way of knowing the exact place of burial within the Dublan Cemetery.
  M iii Erron Williams FARR was born on 13 Nov 1897. He died on 2 Feb 1976.
  F iv
Veretta FARR [scrapbook] 1 was born 2 on 16 Apr 1900 in Colonia Dublán, Chihuahua, Mexico. She died 3 on 6 Jun 1912. She was buried in Tucson, Pima, Arizona, United States.



"Uncle Heber's little girl, Veta, about five or six years older than I, was my little guardian angel.  She always looked after me--saw that I didn't get hurt and that I got my turn in the swing.  She took me to Sunday School and at Christmas time we went to buy popcorn balls together.  She cut pictures out of magazines for me.  I loved her dearly.  She was always so kind and good to me.  I bless her memory to this day."*
*an excerpt from  a book, "Harps on the Willows," by Melva Webb

NOTE "Uncle Heber's little girl, Veta, about five or six years older than
Herbert, daughter of Edith FARR Webb, who is the daughter of Winslow Jr. and Susan Melvina Bingham Farr.

BURI PLAC Binghampton Cemetery, Binghampton, Arizona
BURI NOTE Veretta is buried very near her maternal Grandfather, Frederick G. Williams, and her paternal Great Grandmother, Susan Green Bingham.  The graves are in the northern section of the cemetery, and are clearly marked.
  F v Tressa Olive FARR was born on 27 Jun 1902. She died on 1 Feb 1982.
  M vi Rudolph FARR was born on 14 Jul 1904. He died on 30 Jan 1993.
  M vii Elvin Erastus FARR was born on 4 Aug 1906. He died on 14 Aug 1991.
  F viii Milda FARR was born on 28 Oct 1908. She died on 24 Apr 1991.
  F ix Gwenevere FARR was born on 1 Apr 1911. She died on 24 Dec 1989.
  M x Maurice Frederick FARR was born on 4 May 1913. He died on 12 Jan 1992.
  F xi Mercelle FARR was born on 26 Jun 1915. She died on 26 Nov 2001.
  M xii Oswald Woodrow FARR was born on 14 Jul 1917. He died on 16 Apr 2006.

Heber Erastus FARR [Parents] [scrapbook] 1 was born 2 on 16 Aug 1875 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. He was christened on 24 Aug 1875 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. He died 3 on 6 Jun 1965 in Provo, Utah, Utah, United States. He was buried on 9 Jun 1965 in Pleasant Grove, Utah, Utah, United States. Heber married 4 Rosemilda Ranghilda (Hilda) BLUTH on 25 Mar 1904 in Colonia Dublán, Chihuahua, Mexico.

Other marriages:
WILLIAMS, Amanda Elizabeth

Heber was born in a log cabin on Main Street (now Washington Blvd.) and 20th Street on a Monday morning at 3:40 a.m.

 ORDN DATE 17 AUG 1891
 ORDN PLAC Colonia Dublan, Chihuahua, Mexico
 ORDN NOTE Ordained a deacon by Apostle George Teasdale, Winslow Farr, Jr., Frederick G. Williams II, and Philip H. Hurst.
 ORDN DATE 11 FEB 1893
 ORDN PLAC Colonia Dublan, Chihuahua, Mexico
 ORDN NOTE Ordained a Priest under the hands of Joseph Wright, Frederick G. Williams II, and Harry M. Payne.
 ORDN DATE 4 MAR 1894
 ORDN PLAC Colonia Dublan, Chihuahua, Mexico
 ORDN NOTE Ordained an Elder under the hands of Apostle John Henry Smith and Bishop Winslow Farr, Jr.
 ORDN DATE 18 DEC 1895
 ORDN PLAC Colonia Dublan, Chihuahua, Mexico
 ORDN NOTE Ordained a Seventy of the 99th Quorum by Edward Stevenson who was ordained by Joseph Young who was ordained by Joseph Smith who was ordained by Peter, James and John.  (Heber's priesthood line of authority.)
 EVEN TYPE Mission
 EVEN DATE BET 1897 AND 1899
 EVEN PLAC Eastern States Mission (Pennsylvania)
 EVEN NOTE Dates are approximate.
 OCCU Cutting ice from the ice pond DATE 1887  OCCU Cutting ice from the ice pond PLAC Ogden, Weber, Utah  NOTE One time Heber fell into the ice pond.  When his rescuers got him out, his clothes were frozen, and so they had to stand him in the back of the truck, drove him the mile to home, where his mother had to pull off his clothes.  In the summer he worked on the ice wagon delivering ice to customers.
 RESI Colonia Dublan, Mexico DATE 1890
 RESI Colonia Dublan, Mexico NOTE Heber moved with his father and mother and siblings from Ogden to Mexico in 1890 rather than suffer his father's imprisonment again for polygamy.  They traveled by train to Deming, New Mexico, where they reassembled the covered wagons, which they had previously disassembled and took with them on the train.  The family had to live the first year in Colonia Diaz because the river was too high to cross.  NOTE Heber moved with his father and mother and siblings from Ogden to (Colonia Diaz was completely leveled during the Mexican Revolution of 1912.  There is nothing left of it.)  The next summer they moved to Colonia Dublan, about 50 miles further south. They pitched their tents on a prairie of dry grass about two miles from the river where they had to go to get water until they could dig wells.  They bought two terrenos (lots or plots of land) from a Mexican. l; They moved on the land, cleared it, plowed, planted and set out an orchard.  They hired some Mexicans to make adobes, and then built them a house.  Heber was chosen President of the Deacons quorum, then President of the Mutual.  These were his first Church positions.

Binghampton, Arizona DATE 1909  NOTE  The Farrs, along with several other families, moved from Mexico to a small settlement near Tucson, Arizona, in December of 1909.  By this time, Heber and Lizzy had seven children, and Heber had taken a second wife who also had several small children.  Plans had been made earlier with President Joseph Robinson, President of the California Mission, to visit.  On Saturday morning, May 21, 1910, Heber Farr and his uncle, Nephi Bingham, met the train from Salt Lake and California to get George Albert Smith, Joseph W. McMurrin and President Joseph E. Robinson.

The following Sunday afternoon, May 22, 1910, the first branch of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints was organized in the shade at the east of the Bingham  home.  The opening prayer was given by President Joseph E. Robinson.  The new branch was called "Binghampton Branch" after Uncle Nephi Bingham.  There was already a little town in Arizona by the name of Bingham.  Heber Farr was ordained Branch President, Fredrick Granger Williams (Lizzy's father), first counselor and Frank Webb, second counselor.  The sacrament was passed, talks were given, and the closing prayer was given by Joseph A. Farr.

Church services were held that summer under the shade trees by Heber and Joseph Farr's homes.  Uncle Nephi Bingham was county trustee of the Davidson School District.  He received permission to have a large school house built as more Saints and relatives were moving out of Mexico.  By Sept. 1910, the school house was built and by adding the little school house to the south end of the new building there was room for a stage and two class rooms more.

Uncle Nephi got permission to hold Church services in the school house.  At that time the Sunday School was organized.  Joseph A. Farr was ordained Superintendent of Sunday School, Elmer Cardon as 1st assistant, J. Alma Young as 2nd assistant, Ellen Bluth as secretary, and Clara Bingham as assistant secretary.  Heber O. Chlarson was set apart as Ward Clerk.  The next Sunday the Ladies' Relief Society was organized with Elizabeth Farr as president, May Bingham (Nephi's daughter) and Lindy Young (her sister) as her assistants and Hazel Williams (another sister) as secretary.  Later the Primary and Mutual were organized.  See "History of Binghampton" by Edna Bingham Sabin, in the possession of Sherrie Farr Dunford, Julie Farr Thomas, and other Farr family members.

 RESI Orem, Utah DATE 1926
 RESI Grandpa Bingham's place DATE 1888
 RESI Grandpa Bingham's place PLAC Huntsville, Weber, Utah

Heber spent a lot of time at Grandpa Bingham's, and while his father was in Southern Utah trying to escape the U.S. Marshals who wanted him imprisoned for polygamy, and during his father's imprisonment, Heber's mother, Melvina, took her six children (and one on the way) and went to live with her parents, Susan and Erastus Bingham in Huntsville.  It was here that Heber became well acquainted with future prophet and president David O. McKay, as they played and went to Primary and Sunday School.

Married by Bishop Winslow Farr, Jr., at the Frederick G. Williams II home in Colonia Dublan, Mexico. This sealing took place in Colonia Dublan, Chihuahua, Mexico by John Henry Smith.  Sealed again in Salt Lake 4 Oct 1899 when she took out her endowments.

SLGS NOTE This sealing took place in Colonia Dublan, Chihuahua, Mexico, and CONC occured before she was endowed.  Sealed by Anthony W. Ivans

Rosemilda Ranghilda (Hilda) BLUTH [scrapbook] 1 was born on 12 Feb 1883 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. She was christened on 5 Apr 1883 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. She died on 21 Nov 1973 in Provo, Utah, Utah, United States. She was buried on 24 Nov 1973 in Pleasant Grove, Utah, Utah, United States. Rosemilda married 2 Heber Erastus FARR on 25 Mar 1904 in Colonia Dublán, Chihuahua, Mexico.


AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF ROSEMILDA RANGHILDA BLUTH FARR
A Sketch of My Life by Hilda B. Farr

I wish I could give you a word picture of what has passed through my mind and before my eyes since I began life here on earth. I know of no one who has more reasons to be grateful than I for the many blessings that have come to me in my life.

I was born in this land of the free—in this great nation. I have always been glad I didn’t have to live during the dark ages. I was born the 12th of February 1883 in the city of Ogden, Weber County, Utah. My father was A.C.F. Bluth, who was born in Stockholm, Sweden August 24, 1842. My mother was Johanna Johnson Bluth, born May 14, 1848 at Goteberg, Sweden. They were both converts to the Latter-day Saints Church. My father had been married twice before he married my mother. Both of his first wives had died as had three of his children, leaving him only one young son. My mother had six children. I was the third child. Two older sisters than myself had died before I was born and I had three younger brothers.
When I was six years old, my parents moved to old Mexico in 1889. The relentless zeal of the U. S. Marshalls in seeking out violators of the Edmund-Tucker Law, had put many members of the Church in danger of prison sentences. My father was among those harassed Mormon members, which were being persecuted for their religious beliefs. Something had to be done. The Presidency of the Church made arrangements for a place of refuge where the Saints could live, which was across the border into old Mexico. A migration began which lasted for many years and as a result, eight colonies were established in that land.

My father’s family left Ogden by train the 15th of May 1889. The train took us to Deming, New Mexico where we remained for some time until arrangements could be made for someone to take us by team and wagon to our future home in the colonies. While at Deming, my second brother, Jared William, died with scarlet fever and was buried in Deming. My brother Oscar and I had both had scarlet fever and whooping cough before we left Ogden, which left me with a complication. I was left totally blind. I was blind for several months and under the doctor’s care, but it was only though the faith and prayers of my parents that I was healed and regained my sight.

To travel by team and wagon was no hardship for us children, but I’m sure my mother never felt it was a pleasure trip; cooking over a campfire and sleeping out. I well remember the large barrels on each side of the wagon filled with water for both our use and for the horses. A large tent was set up each night and taken down in the morning when we were ready to travel again. On those nights as we were camping out, we could hear the howl of coyotes and wolves, a sound that always frightened me and I was always afraid one would come too near. The road was no paved highway and was rough traveling. We also had to ford two large rivers.

One month from the time we left Ogden, Utah, we arrived in the colony of Dublan in Old Mexico. We now were in a strange land to begin a new life. Father set up our tent and then we gathered weeping willow tree limbs and built a nice bowery of willows in front of our tent, where we lived until father built our home. He made a mold himself, and made mud bricks called adobies from which he built us a two room house. We later added more rooms, which we felt made us quite comfortable.

My first school was at a neighbor’s home. Mollie Jones was the teacher of the school, where all the children of the families settled there, plus a lot of Mexican children gathered. I had a hard time learning English as I had been raised a little Swedish girl. My mother spoke only Swedish until quite late in her life; she learned what English my father taught her. I remember my father talking to mother in English and she would always answer him in Swedish. As more people came and a church was built, we held our school in the church house. I was 18 years old before I finished the eighth grade which was the highest our schools in Dublan went and I was not allowed to attend the academy at Juarez which was the church school 18 miles away. My father didn’t think girls needed any more education.

After I finished school, I went out working for other people, doing house work and sewing, which I enjoyed. Later I got a chance to work in the Mercantile Establishment where I was the cashier. It was while I was working at this store that I met and became acquainted with a good fellow of our town named H. E. Farr, whom I later married. He was a leader in the Stake, a member of the High Council, a stake missionary, and had filled a three year mission to the Eastern States, laboring in Pennsylvania. We were married March 25, 1904 at Colonia Juarez by President Ivins and later came to Salt Lake City to the Temple and had my endowments.

My first child, a son, was born the 4th of July 1906. We named him Halvan Heber. When my baby was eight months old, I went with my husband to the northern part of the State of Chihuahua, deep down into Mexico where he and some others from our colony had found work on a railroad. Myself and a sister-in-law were the only white women among several hundred Mexican, Japanese, and Indian men who were working for my husband on the railroad. It was a lovely place to live. Such an even climate, no frost, and with beautiful evergreen trees so large some were several feet through the trunk, and wild flowers and ferns. We built a log house to live in.

After some time, I went home for I was expecting a new baby. On May 18, 1908, my second son was born. A lovely baby, but he only lived a week. His father never was privileged to see him. I named him Ivan Bluth Farr. It was a sad time for me as I was young and inexperienced. My parents were such a comfort to me. My father made the little coffin to bury him in and it was lovely—all covered white and trimmed with lace. My father was an expert cabinet maker and helped to build many of the homes in the colony where we lived. After some time my husband came home for a short time and again I accompanied him back to his work with the railroad. After some time, the work with the railroad ended and we returned to our home in Dublan where our third son was born September 3, 1909. We called him Deral Winslow.

Money was quite scarce in the colonies and the stake president had advised people to find good temporary work elsewhere to bring in a little money to help pay for their homes. Some of my husband’s people persuaded him to come to Arizona where he contracted for a large tract of land in Tucson, Pima County. We left our home in Mexico to which we expected to come back some day. Several families left with us in November 1909. Deral was just two months old and Halvan just three. We moved in a wagon which was fixed up with an extension top over the wagon bed, so we could sleep in the wagon at night, but we had to do our cooking on a camp fire. We were about a month on our way, reaching Tucson near Christmas time.

There was no church organization in Tucson. My husband’s relatives were not L.D.S. members then, but were later baptized and came into the church. Other families moved in and in a short time a branch of the California Mission was organized and was called Binghampton. My husband was called to be the Branch President, which position he held for about fifteen years.

During the year 1912, because of the civil war in Mexico and the constant raid of bandits and guerilla bands, the members of the church residing in the Juarez Stake (consisting of eight settlements or wards) were robbed and persecuted and finally forced to seek refuge in the United States with the hope that they would again return to their homes, most of which were located close to the border. But as time passed and the conditions had not improved, a large number moved away and located in other stakes. We had been in Arizona three years and were pretty well settled when the people were driven out of Mexico. My husband, along with others, went to El Paso to help the people get located on lands and find homes and employment. There was 4,000 saints who left the colonies.

When our oldest son Halvan was ten years old, he was afflicted with tetnus (lockjaw). He was seriously ill, having convulsions for 21 days. The medical doctors said he was beyond help and was pronounced dead by the doctor of the hospital and the nurse even pinned the little death cross on his bed, as he was in a Catholic hospital. When we were notified of his death, we went immediately to the hospital and my husband and President Robinson of the California Mission who was with us, did not feel he was gone. They administered to him and in a very few seconds he began breathing again. He was restored to health. The nuns at the hospital always spoke of him as the resurrection and the miracle boy. It was truly a miracle of healing.

In 1926, we had to make another move. We had done well in Tucson and were comfortably situated, but my husband’s health broke down when he was nearly killed by a jersey bull. He couldn’t seem to gain his health back until he came to the Salt Lake Temple and received a special blessing for his health. So when our baby daughter Yvonne was three months old, I left Arizona to move to Utah. Myself and the four youngest children, Keith 6, Azona 4 ½ , Nadine 2, and the baby came on the train by way of San Francisco—crossed Oakland Bay on a boat. Then we boarded a train and came across the new railroad across the Great Salt Lake called the Lucian Cutoff. My husband and the older children had previously come by car bringing our household belongings and found us a house to live in. Before I arrived, Lawrence, who was in Provo with his father, was hit by a car. It broke his arm and fractured his skull. Everyone thought him a dead boy, but through good medical care and nursing and prayer, he was soon able to be around again. His father brought him to Ogden to meet us at the train. How frightened I was when I saw his head and his arm all bandaged.

Soon after, we bought a farm and moved to Pleasant Grove. In 1929, our youngest son Keith, who was then 10 ½ years old, had rheumatic fever which left his heart weak and he died in June of 1929. You can imagine with this large of a family we have spent lots of days and nights doctoring for earaches, toothaches, measles, mumps, and all the other ailments of childhood, none of which ever seemed to pass us by without all having to have their turn. I remember the day we took the four youngest children to Salt Lake to have their tonsils removed. It seemed in those days they used to take out tonsils as a family project. Forty-five miles to Salt Lake seemed like quite a trip then in our old car. Josephine, Azona, and Nadine had their tonsils removed, but the doctor thought Yvonne should wait. As it turned out Yvonne was sicker than the other three, just from smelling the ether. After ten days Josephine had a serious hemorrhage from her operation, which was a lot of worry at the time.

Eight of our children married and are sealed to their partners in the Temple. Our son Deral hasn’t chosen him a wife as yet. All have married well, good members of the L.D.S. Church and active and willing to take part in their church activities. When I go over the jobs my children are doing in the church, I believe it includes every organization in the church nearly,--they are Sunday School teachers and coordinators, Relief Society Presidents and Secretary, Sunday School chorister, Primary Teacher, MIA Counselor, two sons and four sons-in-law are members of ward bishoprics, stake missionaries, Seventy’s and Elder’s Quorums, and served on the High Council.

We now own a home in Provo and have an interest in a dairy farm in Payson where our two oldest sons live and operate the farm.

I was involved in a car accident in 1952 as I was returning from a visit to our oldest daughter’s, who lives in Roosevelt. It was in January, and the driver of the car lost control on the icy road in Daniel’s Canyon. The car went over an embankment which was quite steep and down a few hundred feet and stopped in about three feet of snow. The door came open and I was thrown from the car. Somehow I managed to climb back up the embankment and signaled for help. We were taken to the hospital at Heber City. The car was demolished and the driver had a broken back. I had several fractured ribs and many cuts and bruises, but I felt my life had been wonderfully preserved. I was in the hospital for three days and was then taken to my daughter Josephine’s home where I remained for some time until I was able to care for myself again.

Our son Lawrence Waldo died in August of 1957 after a lingering illness with cancer, leaving a lovely wife and five fine children. His death occurred on his father’s birthday, the 16th of August. His father was 82 and he was 42. Lawrence was well loved and respected—there were 1600 people that came and paid their respects at his funeral in the little town of Pleasant Grove where he and his family lived.

I have thirty five grandchildren and ten great grandchildren. I am thinking of the years yet to come, that I hope to enjoy with my family. My church work has been something I have enjoyed all my life and still do. We have visited five of the temples and have worked in the Salt Lake Temple ever since we came to Utah, which is now over thirty years. I earnestly desire to do more research work and temple work.

Our children are all wonderfully considerate of us and very dutiful of our wishes and needs. These incidents may mean but little to others, but to me they are milestones of my life and are important and dear to me. My life is still a joy to me and I pray it to be so for many years yet to come.

Hilda passed away 21 Nov 1973 in Provo, Utah, Utah. She was buried 24 Nov 1973 in Pleasant Grove, Utah, age 90 years old

They had the following children.

  M i Halvan Heber FARR was born on 4 Jul 1906. He died on 23 May 1984.
  M ii
Ivan Bluth FARR 1 was born on 18 May 1908 in Colonia Dublán, Chihuahua, Mexico. He died on 25 May 1908 in Colonia Dublán, Chihuahua, Mexico. He was buried in Colonia Dublán, Chihuahua, Mexico.
  M iii Deral Winslow FARR was born on 3 Sep 1909. He died on 10 Jul 1997.
  F iv Maybelle FARR was born on 7 Jul 1911. She died on 5 Oct 2003.
  F v Winifred FARR was born on 22 May 1913. She died on 26 Apr 2007.
  M vi Lawrence Waldo FARR was born on 28 Feb 1915. He died on 15 Aug 1957.
  F vii Josephine FARR was born on 26 Jan 1917. She died on 30 Apr 1999.
  M viii
Keith Sawtelle FARR [scrapbook] 1 was born 2 on 1 Dec 1919 in Tucson, Pima, Arizona, United States. He died 3 on 5 Jun 1929 in Pleasant Grove, Utah, Utah, United States. He was buried in Pleasant Grove, Utah, Utah, United States.
  M ix
Joseph Lorin FARR 1 was born in Sep 1920 in Tucson, Pima, Arizona, United States. He died in Sep 1920 in Tucson, Pima, Arizona, United States.
  F x Azona FARR.
  F xi Nadine FARR.
  F xii Yvonne FARR.

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