Ancestors of Tim Farr and Descendants of Stephen Farr Sr. of Concord, Massachusetts and Lidlington, Bedfordshire, England


Samuel PIERCE was born 1 on 25 Nov 1681 in Woburn, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. He died 2 on 26 Jan 1774 in Mansfield City, Tolland, Connecticut, United States. Samuel married 3, 4 Abigail JOHNSON on 14 Jun 1705 in Woburn, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

Samuel had a will 5 on 12 Feb 1767 in Mansfield City, Tolland, Connecticut, United States. His will was probated 6 on 14 Feb 1774 in Mansfield City, Tolland, Connecticut, United States.

Abigail JOHNSON [Parents] was born 1, 2 on 4 Oct 1674 in Woburn, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. She died before 26 Jan 1774 in Mansfield City, Tolland, Connecticut, United States. Abigail married 3, 4 Samuel PIERCE on 14 Jun 1705 in Woburn, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.


Henry ROLFE [Parents] [scrapbook] was christened 1 on 5 Sep 1585 in Whiteparish, Wiltshire, England, United Kingdom. He died 2, 3 on 1 Mar 1643 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts, United States. Henry married 4 Honour ROLFE on 28 May 1621 in Whiteparish, Wiltshire, England, United Kingdom.

ESTATE OF HENRY ROFFE OF NEWBURY.

" The 15th 12th month 1642 I desire to comend my soule into the hands of the lord Jesus Christ. I desire my goods may be equally divided to my wife & all my children, only my sonne John Roffe must have the howse & land more then all the rest of my children and that their porcons shalbe divided when they be 21 yeares of age if they marry not before In case my wife dye or marry then the goods shalbe divided; otherwise not till my eldest childe come to be 21. yeares of age But still to remayne in their mothers hands with the rest till that either of them are 21 yeares of age or marry If any of my children dye then that porcon shalbe equally divided betweene my wife & the rest of my children. I doe give vnto my wife one great brasse pott and one great brasse pann, and a great brasee posnett and a chafing dish and five pewter platters I doe give vnto my Kinsman Thomas whittear a swarme of bees. I desire my brother John Roffe and my Cosen John Saunders of Sallisbery and william Mondy of Newberry to oversee my will & order it to my desire & accordinge to my will."

Henry Roffe.

Witness: Thomas Hale, Thomas Cowllman, william Mose.
Proved 28: 1: 1643.
Ipswich. Deeds, vol. 1, leaf 2.

Inventory taken 1: 1: 1642, by John Woodbridg, Henry Short and Richard Knight: howse & land, 30li.; Six kowes, 30li.; foure oxen, 24li.; one bull & one steere, 3 yeare old, 7li. 10s.; three beasts, two years old, 8li.; two beasts, one yeare old, 2li. 10s.; three Calves, 1li. 4s.; three hoggs, 1li. 4s.; Bees, 7li. 10s.; haye, 4li.; Soyle, 1li.; Cart, Slead & 3 Yoaks, 1li. 6s.; within the howse: one fetherbed & flockbed, 3li. 10s.; Six fether pillowes, l8s.; 4 Coverleds, 2li.; 5 blanketts, 1li. 10s. ; 3 paier of Sheets, 1li. 8s.; 2li. and a. halfe of bee wax, 2s. 6d.; bowlster Case & pillow & napkins, 10s.; porke, 2li. 7s.; butter & Cheese, 12s.; barrells & butte[r] Cherne & other lumb., 18s.; Pewter, 1li. 7s. 6d.; Brasse, 3li. 13s.; a Brasse pott, 1li.; iron potts, 1li. 6s.; A chafing dish & a posnet, 5s.; 12 bushells of indian come, 2li. 2s.; 9 bushells of wheate, 2li. 6d.; 2 bushells of pease, 9s.; hogsheads & howes & other lumber, 10s.; in apparrell, stock-ins & shoes, 3li.; muskett & fowling peeces & 2 Swords & bandileers, 1li. 19s.; working Tooles & lanthorne, 15s.; bookes, 1li.; spining wheeles, 10s.; a chest & chaiers & other lumb., 10s.; harrow tines, 10s.; total, 153li. 8s. 6d. Ipswich Deeds. vol. 1. leaf 3.

Honour ROLFE [Parents] [scrapbook] was born about 1598 in Wiltshire, England, United Kingdom. She died 1 on 19 Dec 1650 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts, United States. Honour married 2 Henry ROLFE on 28 May 1621 in Whiteparish, Wiltshire, England, United Kingdom.

Honour's will was probated 3 on 30 Sep 1651 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts, United States.

Other marriages:
BLANCHARD, Thomas

ESTATE OF HONOR ROLPE OF NEWBURY.

"Henry Largiu of Charlstowne ------ house of Thomas Blanchard on n----- where widdow Honour Rolfe lay ----- berry lay sick. Shee did declare h------ be; that her sonne Beniam Rolfe should haue the substance of her estate, which was her owne pp estate, & that he should be her sole Executor. Only she gaue these pticulers as followeth, her bedding & Clothes linnen and woollen she gaue to be equally deuided betwixt her two daughters. Also shee gaue twenty shillings a piece to her fourc grtuidchildren to be giucn them five yearca after her death. Also one little Cowe she gaue to her Daughter yt hues at Newberry. Also of foure peeces of Brasse shee gaue two to her sonne Benjamin, which he should Choose, & to each of her daughters one. The rest shee gaue to her Sonne Beniamine, saueing two pewter platters which she gauc to cach of her daughters one. & further shoe cxprest her mind about a Barnc that is built vpon pt of her sonne Beniamins ground, she gaue to her sonne John Rolfe all her interest in the ground that the Barne stood vpon. this is the substance of her expression as farr as he can remember
"memorandum that pt of the 22 the whole 23.24 & pt of y 25 lines were blotted out
Ri. Bellingham.
"Taken vpon oath by the said Henry Largin this 20 12 1650. who further saith that the said Honor Rolfe was of a disposeing memory. before me Ri. Belhingham.
"The Testymoney of George Vaghan Aged abought 23 yeares Concerning the last will of Honor Rolfe widdow deceased: 19th of 10th mo. 1650. This Deponent saith that himselfe being in prfence together with Henry Largin some two daies before the death of the aboue said testator, he heard her make this her last will in maner following. Inprimis She bequeathed all her estate in generall to her yongcst Sonne Beniamine Rolfe onely excepted those pticulore which follow: Item to her foure Grand Children she gaue twenty shillings a peec, to be paid them foure or flue yeare after that time. Item all her Right in halfe an acre of Ground on which the Barne stands and a yonge sowe she gaue to her sonne John Rohfe: Item a little Cowe that she had she gaue to her daughter Hanah Dole. Item all her weareing Cloathes & bedding she gaue to be equally deuided betweene her two Daughters Anna and Hanah: these pticu1cm abouesaid this deponent tooke spetiall notice of; & further he saith not: only a day after her sonne in lawe Richard Dole comeing to her desired this Deponent to Aske her what she would doe with the three pounds ten shillings in England, & shoe Answered that she would that her sonne Beniamine should haue a sute of Cloathes out of it, & the rest he should haue meaning her said sonne in Lawe Richard Dole. The word Beniamine enterhined. Taken upon oath this 20th of the 12th mo 1650 before me William Hibbins"
"The Court vpon the Testimoneys of George Vaughan & Henry Largrn of Charlestowne as fare as there Testiinonys doe agree is the will & Testamet of Honour Rolfe." Copy of will, Ipswich Deeds, vol. 1, leaf 123.

Proved 30: 7: 1651 by Henry Lurgen and George Vaughan. Ipswich Quarterly Court Records, vol. 1, page 26.

They had the following children.

  M i Benjamin ROLFE was born in 1638.
  F ii Hannah ROLFE died in 1678.
  F iii Anna ROLFE was born in 1626.
  M iv John ROLFE was born on 10 May 1634. He died on 30 Sep 1681.

George DAVIS [scrapbook] 1 was born in 1610 in Lynn, Essex, Massachusetts, United States. He died 2 on 14 Jul 1667 in Reading, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. George married 3, 4 Sarah CLARKE before 1643 in Lynn, Essex, Massachusetts, United States.

May have had a first wife named Mary Audley and then married Sarah who he mentions in his will.

George Davis.___ I, George Davis, beinge bound for Cape Feare, doe now dispose my outward estate as followeth, in case I die before I come againe or shall hear after make any other will; being in health, My whole estate, that I leave in New England, I do bestow vppon my wife and Children, and doe make my wife executrix, and my son, Benjamin, executor Joyntly. My estate to be divided into five parts, two parts I give to my wife and my son Benjamine equaly, the other three parts I give to my five daus to be divided equaly, and to be paid vnto them when they come to age, or when they may, as their mother shall Judg best, and their mothers part she has power to dispose it to her she dies to those or to all of my Children, soe it be to my Children, that are most Loving and dutifull unto her. My house and land I do dispose to my wife and my sone Benjamine, provided my daughters have their portions, though it be in other things. To my sone, .Joseph, I give all that I have now in the shipp, and that we cary with us to Cape Feare, with the weavers loome; but in Case it does Miscary before it come ther, and he corn agen to new England, my executors out of the whole estate shall pay him ten pound farther, becaus my Daughters, som of them, are young, and to be brought vpp in the feare of God and well educated, is my desire, which I hope my wife will not be wanting in, therfor their portions shalbe responsable for theire bringinge upp and left to the discresion of my wife what to pay them when they come to age, or when she
dies. I have chosen for one overseer of this my last will, my brother, William Clark, of hun, and doe you chuse another whome you think fit, and give them 40s apeece, and trust to their faithfullnes and care for my poor Chilldren. Dec. 7, 1664. GE0RG DAVIS.

Printed from NEHG Register, Volume 16, January 1862, New England Historic Genealogical Society & Broderbund Software, Inc., Banner Blue Division, March 6, 2001


Soon after George Davis's death, certainly before 1672, Sarah was married for a second time, to Nicholas Rist of Reading [Eaton, 109 110). The will of Sarah Rist of Redding, written 20 Sept. 1697, probated 15 May 1698, touching the worldly estate that my former husband George Davis and my son Benjamin Davis gave to me by their last wills for to dispose of, give and devise the same as follows: to grandson Joshua Davis all ye Homestead.... that is ye same that I now dwell in.. with all the lotts, divisions and dividents. . . .thereto belonging, Joshua to pay to my daughters the legacies hereafter mentioned: to daughter Sarah Cole, to daughter Hannah Boutell, to son-in-law Timothy Wylye [mentioned as William Clarke's nephew and son of Thomas Clarke's neighbor], to daughter Mary Damon, to Susannah Richardson. Executor: Joshua Davis, grandson. Witnesses: Benjamin Burnap, Doroas Burnap, Elizabeth Arnold. [Middlesex Co. Prob. 9:399.] This last witness was the orphaned granddaughter of Thomas Clarke of Readingl Elizabeth Arnold was born at Reading 17 June 1079, daughter of William and Elizabeth (Clarke) Arnold; she married in Woburn, 22 Dec. 1699, James Richardson. At the time she signed this will both her parents and both her Clarke grandparents were dead. Was she then living with her next of kin, her grandfather's sister Sarah Rist? On 11 Aug. 1701 Joshua Davis of Boston, Joyner, and wife Rebecca sold to William Bryant of Reading, blacksmith, inter alia, a houselot bounded by land of William Arnold deceased [Thomas Clarke's son in law]; also a meadow bounded by William Eaton and Major Swaine [Thomas Clarke's stepson); also a parcel of meadow and swamp-land whioh lyeth undivided between Nicholas Fist and me Joshua Davis, arain bounded by land of William Arnold deceased. All these lands were located in Reading. Witnesses:  Jeremiah Swayne, Jn0 White, Joshua Eaton. [Middlesex Deeds, 13:12.1 This grantor, Sarah Rist's grandson, Joshua Davis son of Joseph Davis, was born at Reading 29 Jan. 1673, married there 29th May 1697 Rebecca Peirce, daughter of John and Ruth (Bishop) Peirce [TAG, supra, 25:163j. The grantee, William Bryant, blacksmith, of Reading, had married there on 5 May 1701 Rebecca Arnold, Thomas Clarke's granddaughter, born at Reading 6 Dec. 1661, daughter of William and Elizabeth (Clarke) Arnold. The property described was a part of George Davis's estate as a proprietor of Reading, which estate had passed to Joshua Davis by his grandmother's will, and which he thus conveyed to his second cousin's husband, probably because William Bryant had already or was about to come into possession of adjoining lands which had belonged to his grandfather in law, Thomas Clarke. It's all in the family~ George Davis and Sarah Clarke had eight children, the last six recorded at Reading:

i. Benjamin, d. at Reading in October 1679 (probably on 31 Oct. rather than on 13 Oct. as shown in the printed vital records of Reading). During King Philip's War he Was a soldier in Capt. Poole's Company (George M. Bodge, Soldiers in King Philip's War, 1906, 420). The will of Benjamim Davis, dated the 29th of Oct. 1679, proved 6, 8, 1682, gave his whole estateTo his mother Sarah Rice (or Rist), except two acres to his sister Mary Grover to help her bring up her children while she remains a widow. Executors: Goodwife Rice and John Damon, who was also a witness. Inventory of the estate of Benjamin Davis who departed this life the last of October 1679 taken 5, 9th, 1679, by Jeremiah Swayn and Benjamin Fitch, totaled 158.01.00 Including housing, lands, orchard, neadow, swamp and divident, oxen, cows, steer, horse, bridles, saddle, pistols, cutlash and other acooutemts, guns, one pair Sandiliers, joiner's tools and household equipment very evidently the same coproperty enumerated in their father's estate (Middlesex Co. Prod. 5:171.). ii. Joseph. d. at Reading 28 Jan. 1676; im. Hannah  On  3 Apr.1677 administration on the estate of Joseph Davis was granted to his widow, Hannah Davis. Inventory amounting to about forty pounds included house, homelot and swamp lands (ibid. 3:166; b:259). Six children, born at Reading, one of these was the ubiquitous Joshua Davis who settled his grandmother Rist's estate. iii. Hannah, b. 31 May 161.8, d. at Woburn in 1719; m. at Lynn 10 May 16o9, John Boutwell, b. there in 161.5, d. at Reading 3 Dec. 1719 aged 71. years, son of James and Alice Boutwell. Nine children, born at Reading. iv. Sarah, b. 1 Oct. 1651; m. at Salem, 11 June 1670, Abraham Cole, b. ca. 1638, d. autumn 1715, son of Thomas and Ann Cole. Re was a tailor at Salem; eight children born there (Perley, 2:131.). v. Elizabeth, b. 16 Jan. 1651., d. at Reading 21 July 1695; m. there 22 Jan. 1678, Timothy Wiley, b. there 21. Apr. 1653, d. there 19 Dec. 1777 son of John and Elizabeth Wiley. Four children, born at Reading. He m. (2) in 1696 Susanna  , who probably d. at Reading 31 Aug. 1732 (Eaton, 126). vi. Mary, b. 16 Jan. 1657/8, d. at Reading 27 Nov. 1727; m. (1) Matthew Grover, who d. in 16W. Two children. She m. (2) Sammiel Damon, b. at Peading 23 June 1656, d. there 12 Jan. 1723/1., son of Dea. John and Abigail

Source: Book area US/CAN 973 D25 aga v.39

DEATH: Actually died at Cape Fear, N.C.

Sarah CLARKE [Parents] [scrapbook] was born in 1620 in Lynn, Essex, Massachusetts, United States. She died 1 on 3 May 1698 in Reading, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. Sarah married 2, 3 George DAVIS before 1643 in Lynn, Essex, Massachusetts, United States.

Sarah had a will 4 on 20 Sep 1697 in Reading, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. Her will was probated 5 on 16 May 1698 in Reading, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

Other marriages:
RIST, Nicholas

Sarah married Nicholas Rist or Rice after the death of her first husband George Davis.

(Warrant for Arrest of Sarah Rice)
To: To the Constables in Reding

You are in theire Majesties names hereby required to apprehend and bring before us Sarah Rice the wife of Nicholas Rice of Reding on Tuesday next being the 31't day of this Instant moneth. at the house of Lt Nathan'l Ingersalls at Salem Village aboute ten of the Clock in the forenoon, who stand charged with haveing Committed. sundry acts of Witchcraft on the Bodys of Mary Walcot and Abigail Williams & others, to theire great hurt: &c in order to her Examination Relateing to the premises aboves'd faile not Dated Salem May 28'th 1692
[fig=BS30719a][/fig] us *John Hathorne [unclear: ] Assis'ts
*Jonathan. Corwin
(Reverse) In obedence to this warant I have brought the Body of Sarah Rice the wife of Nicolas Rice of Redding to the house of Leut nathanal Ingersons in Salem Viledg the: 31 of this Instant May: 1692
Atest *John Parker Constable of Redding
( Essex County Archives, Salem -- Witchcraft Vol. 2 Page 52 )

(Complaint v. Martha Carrier, Elizabeth Fosdick,
Wilmott Reed, Sarah Rice, Elizabeth How, John Alden,
William Proctor, John Flood, Mary Toothaker and
daughter, and Arthur Abbott)
Salem May the 28'th 1692

Joseph Houlton and John Walcot both of Salem village Yeomen made Complaint in behalfe of theire Majes'ts against Martha Carrier  of Andover the wife of Thomas Carrier of s'd Towne husbandman  Elizabeth Fosdick of Maulden or charlstown William Reed of Marble- head the wife of Samull Reed of s'd placeSarah Rice of Reding  the wife of Nicholas Rice of s'd Towne Elizabeth How the wife of  James How of Topsfeild Capt John Alden of Boston Mariner, William  procter of Salem farmes, Capt John flood of Rowley marsh on  boston Mary Toothaker, the wife of Roger toothaker of Belrica,  and Mary Toothaker the daughter of s'd Roger Toothaker Arthur  Abott that lives between Ips. Topsfeild & wenham for sundry acts  of Witchcraft by them and Every one of them Committed on the  Bodys of Mary Walcot, Abigail Williams Marcy Lewis Ann putnam  and Others belonging to Salem Village or farmes Lately, to the hurt  and Injury of theire bodys therefore Craves Justice.

*Joseph houlton
*John Walcutt

Carrier of Andover -- -Marshall Essex

Reed of Marblehead -- Const --

Rice of Reding -- Const -- -

How of Topsfeild -- -Const

Wm procter -- -Const --

( Essex County Archives, Salem )


(Petition of Nicholas Rice)
To the honoured Generall Court now Sitting in Boston

The humble Petition of Nicholas Rist of Reading Sheoweth that whereas Sara Rist wife to the petition'r was taken into Custody the first day of June last and ever Since laine in Boston Goal for witchcraft, tho in all this time Nothing has been made Appear for w'ch shee desur'd Imprisonment or death, the petition'r has been a husband to the Said woman above Tweinty years, in all w'ch time he never had reason to accuse her for any Impietie or witchcraft, but the Contrary Shee lived w'th him as a good Faithfull dutifull wife and alwise had respect #[to the respect] to the ordinances of God while her Strength Remain'd and the petition'r on that Consideration is Obliged in Conscience and Justice #[oblige] to use all lawfull means for the Support and preservation of her life, and it is deplorable that in old age the poor decriped woman should ly under Confinment so long in a Stinching Goal when her Circumstances rather requires a Nurse to Attend her


May it therefore please yo'r hon'rs  to take this matter in to yo'r prudent  Considerations.and derect Some  speedy Methods whereby this ancient  decriped person may not for ever ly  in such Miserie wherein her life is  made more afflictive to her than death,  and the petition'r Shall as in dutie bound  Ever pray

Dated the 19'th october 1692
(Reverse) 1692 The humble petition of Nicholas Rist of Reading

( Mass. Archives Vol. 135 No. 63 )

They had the following children.

  M i
Benjamin DAVIS died 1 on 13 Oct 1679 in Reading, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.



Benjamin, d. at Reading in October 1679 (probably on 31 Oct. rather than on 13 Oct. as shown in the printed vital records of Reading). During King Philip's War he was a soldier in Capt. Poole's Company (George M Bodge, Soldiers in King Phllip's War, 1906, 420). The will of Benjamin Davis, dated 29 Oct. 1679, proved 6, 8, 1682, gave his whole estate to his mother Sarah Rice [or Rist], except two acres to his sister Mary Grover to help her bring up her children while she remains a widow." Executors: Goodwife Rice and John Damon, who was also a witness. Inventory of the estate of Benjamin Davis "who departed this life the last of October 1679" taken 5, 9th, 1679, by Jeremiah Swayn and Benjamin Fitch, totaled £188.01.00, lncIuding housing, lands, orchard, meadow, swamp and "divident," oxen, cows, steer, horse, bridles, saddle, pistols, cutlash and other "accoutemts, guns, one pair Bandiliers, joiner's tools and household equipment very evidently the same property enumerated in his father's estate (Middlesex Co. Prob. 5:174).
  M ii Joseph DAVIS was born in 1643. He died on 28 Jan 1676/1677.
  F iii Hannah DAVIS was born on 31 May 1648. She died in 1719.
  F iv Sarah DAVIS was born on 1 Oct 1651.
  F v Elizabeth DAVIS was born on 16 Jan 1654. She died on 21 Jul 1695.
  F vi Mary DAVIS was born on 16 Jan 1657. She died on 27 Nov 1727.
  M vii
John DAVIS was born 1 on 20 Jul 1660 in Reading, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. He died 2 on 4 Nov 1660.
  F viii
Susannah DAVIS was born 1 on 11 May 1662 in Reading, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. She died 2 in 1738 in Stoneham, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

Susanna, b. 11 May 1662, d. prob. in Stoneham In 1738; m. (1) in Woburn, 22 Oct. 1680, John Richardson, b. there 24 Jan. 1660/1, d. 18 Mar. 1715, son of Lt. John and Elizabeth (Bacon) Richardson. Four children, born in Woburn. (John Adams Vinton, The Richardson Memorial, .1876, 190.) She in. (2) David Roberts; m. (3] as his third wife, Peter Hay, who d. in Stoneham 1 Apr. 1748 aged 91 years. Peter Hay m. (1) 26, 1, 1685, Mary Kibbey, who d. 12 Mar. 1693/4; m. (2) Sarah who d. at Stoneham 3 Mar. 1729 in her 69th year; m. (3) Susanna (Davis)(Richardson) Roberts; m. (4) int. 29 Oct. 1742, Ruth (Peirce)(Eaton)(Dunster) Marrett, who d. 10 July 1748. (T. B. Wyman, Estates and Genealogies of Charlestown, 1:483; TAG, supra, 26:163.)

Joshua DAVIS [Parents] was born 1 on 29 Jan 1673 in Reading, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. Joshua married Rebecca PIERCE on 24 May 1697 in Reading, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

Rebecca PIERCE. Rebecca married Joshua DAVIS on 24 May 1697 in Reading, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.


Thomas ALDOUS [Parents] was christened on 27 Nov 1679 in Fressingfield, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom. He was buried on 20 Feb 1735/1736. Thomas married Ann GODDARD on 16 Dec 1702.

Ann GODDARD. Ann married Thomas ALDOUS on 16 Dec 1702.


Thomas DAVIS [Parents] was born 1 on 31 Jan 1675 in Reading, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. Thomas married 2 Hannah HARTSHORNE on 27 Dec 1698 in Reading, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

Hannah HARTSHORNE. Hannah married 1 Thomas DAVIS on 27 Dec 1698 in Reading, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.


William PATTEN [scrapbook] 1, 2 was born 3 in 1606 in Hardington, Mandeville, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. He died 4, 5 on 10 Dec 1668 in Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. William married 6 Mary in BY 1632 in England, United Kingdom.

William's will was probated 7 on 2 Apr 1669 in Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

WILLIAM PATTEN OF CAMBRIDGE


(512) 1. WILLIAM PATTEN. The origin and location of the ancestry of William Patten has always been an open question. There are traditions regarding the family in England, but, in his case, there is no evidence in support of them. It is reported that a family of Pattens was in the north of England and went from there to Scotland in the fifteenth century, and about a century later some of their descendants went to the north of Ireland. Such a theory may be correct regarding the Pattens who came to this country in the eighteenth century, as they are stated to have come from Scotland and from Ireland.

A survey of Great Britain at the time of the settlement of New England shows but a few places where the name of Patten occurs to any very great extent. One of these was Lancaster County. In the parish of Warrington, sixteen miles east from Liverpool, there was a family of Pattens, and it was from this neighborhood that many settlers came to Dorchester and its vicinity. It is also from this region that the William Patten went who was Bishop of Winchester and founder of Magdalen College. The latter is a man who is claimed by most of the Pattens in this country as their ancestor, but we have so far failed to find any proof which could connect them with him. The earliest will to be found in this region is that of Thomas Patten, of Warrington, in 1579. After this we find no other wills until 1653, when one Thomas Patten, of Warrington, made his will and in it expressed gratitude to his brother William for various kind favors and appointed him as his executor. This could hardly have been our William, for as he had already been in this country at least eighteen years, it is not probable that he would at that time have been appointed an executor of a will in England.

Another locality where there were many Pattens was the county of Somerset, and it is to this family that we are inclined to think our William belonged. Nothing has been found to show by what vessel he came here, and if this point could be established a clue would perhaps be furnished to his residence before coming to this country.

We find also traditions in the family, not only in one branch but in many, that three brothers came to this country and settled in different places. This is a tradition that can be found to exist in a large number of New England families. This fact, as far as this family is concerned, is not supported by any evidence. Besides William Patten there seems to have been but one other of that name mentioned in the records of that time. This was Nathaniel Patten, who settled in Dorchester. Nathaniel Patten came from Crewkerne [crucis urna, the place of the cross], in the county of Somerset, England, and while he may possibly have been related in some way to our William, there is no evidence that he was a brother. In fact, the evidence is to the contrary. There is evidence existing to show clearly how and when he came to this country. In the notebook of Thomas Lechford, an attorney of that time, there is a legal document in which Nathaniel s former residence is stated and particulars as to his coming over as one of the charterers of the ship Charles of Bristol, on which he sailed on 18 June, 1640.

In the notebook, referred to is a notice of an account for which he brought suit against the undertakers of the ships Charles of Bristol and the Hopewell of London. The last items in the bill were as follows:

Itm           for a bag of hoppes spoyled by the raine because some of the undertakers gave orders it should not be received aboard
Itm           for a nimming sheet and rugg lent unto the Steward Robert Ring for the undertakers use
Itm           fora cabbin bought in the ship because Ihad not convenience in the ship according to agreement for myselfe & family
Itm           for a womans pillion lost in the ship Hopewell
Itm           costs & charges att B ristoll from the 24th of May till thel8th of June for myselfe & family because att the said 24th day we should have bin gone
Itm           they undertooke to victuall the said ship Charlesfor 16 weeks & to carry but 150 passingers to my remembrance, and they the passingers were debarred of our beere & water before landing & i/we had bin put to a long voyage we must needs have suffered much more than we did, wch I leave to the consideration of the Cort.

He settled in Dorchester and was a prominent citizen there and was interested in considerable real estate. In Suffolk Registiy of Deeds, under date of 21 July, 1671, we find that Nathaniel Patten, of Dorchester, in the county of Suffolk, appointed his "trusty and welbeloved kinsman Thomas Patten of Bristoll nowe resident in Boston" his true and lawful attorney to act in all business matters for him. This Thomas Patten probably did not remain here permanently, as there is no further evidence of him after the settlement of the estate of Nathaniel. Nathaniel Patten died 31 January, 1661. He left no surviving children that there is any record of. He left no will, but his wife Justine made a will dated 2 January, 1673. In this, she mentions different relatives to whom she left property, but no children. An agreement was entered into 14 December, 1674, between Benjamin Bale of Dorchester, and Thomas Patten, attorney for his father John Patten of Severalls in the parish of Crewkern, within the realm of England, referring to the settlement of the estate of Nathaniel Patten of Dorchester. This agreement refers to Benjamin Bale as being Nathaniel Patten s sister s son, and provided that all his estate outside of what the court had set aside for the widow should be divided into two equal parts; one part to be given to Benjamin Bale and the other part to Thomas Patten, attorney for John Patten, for the use of said John Patten and any other person concerned with him. By this agreement a division of the real estate was also made, one part being set off to Benjamin Bale in consideration of his delivering to Thomas Patten, sometime the next summer, one load of fresh hay. The other part was set off to Thomas Patten in consideration of his paying to Benjamin Bale fifty-nine pounds.

In England we find the will of Thomas Patten of Crewkern, in Somerset County, and he was clearly the father of Nathaniel. In this will, which was dated 27 March, 1629, mention is made of his nephews Robert and Thomas Patten; also his sons John, Thomas and Nathaniel; his daughters Sarah, Joane and Elizabeth, and his brother John; but the name of William nowhere appears in this family, thus showing that William and this Nathaniel were not brothers.

In Somersetshire we find the will of one Thomas Petten of Hardington Manfylde [Mandeville], Somerset, which we give here: In the Name of God Amen. The ninth daie of November in the second year of the Raigne of our Soveraigne lord Charles by the grace of god King of England, Scotland, Fraunce and Ireland defender of the faith, Anrw Domini One thousand sixe hundred twentie sixe I Thomas Petten of Hardington Man fyZde in the Co untie of Somset, carpenter, being verie sick of my body, but pfect of remembraunce thankes bee given to god therefore doe make my last will & testamt as followeth ffirst I give and bequeath my soule unto the allmightie god whoe gave it and is my maker and Redeemer of all mankind and my bodie to bee buried in the church yard of Hardington Man fyld. Item I give and bequeath unto four said (aforesaid) sonne William Petten one white calfe, one spitt, one Pyckeaxe, one co/er, my best wearing clot heres, my bedd, a Coverled and one paire of dowlish sheets. Item I give and bequeath unto my daughter Jone Petten a debt of neere eleaven pounds of lawful money a/England and the bill obligatory/or the same debt wch debt is in the hands of one WIlliam Joye ofLie and one little cow theme, one co/er and my old cloke. Item I give and bequeath unto my sonne Andrewe Petten All my carpenters working tooles; alsoe I the said Thomas Petten doe ordaine and make my two daughters Margaret Petten and Anne Petten to bee my whole executors joyntly and equallie and shall have all the Residue a/my goods and chattells whatsoever wch is not giver nor bequeathed upon this my last will and Testament. In witness hereof I have hereunto set my hand and seale the daie and yeare first above written.
Signed sealed and published in the presents of us John Marsh, John Apley, John Marsh the younger.
Proved at London 10 May, 1627.

Here we find a William Patten mentioned who may have been our pioneer. The county of Somerset was essentially farming country, and what would be more natural than that one coming from such a country should be selected by the inhabitants of Cambridge as a proper person and one well fitted to take the care of their town cattle. Unfortunately for us, the parish registers for that vicinity in England are not in existence for that period. The Hardington Mandeville registers only go back to the year 1687.

Another question that has been raised is whether there is any coat of arms of the family. We have found, in several branches, what has been held to be a Patten coat of arms, and while we have seen two or three of these,we have found no two of them exactly alike, and probably others, of which we have heard but not seen, have the same dissimilarity. Not every family in England was entitled to bear arms, and we are inclined to the opinion that the Somersetshire Pattens, being a farming class, were not of those who had this right, and consequently there is no true coat of arms for this branch of the family.

The first mention of William Patten to be found in this country is in the Cambridge Town Records under the date of 13 March, 1635/36, when the following vote was passed: Agreed Wth William Patten to kepe 100 Cattell on the otherside the Riuer for the space of seauen Mount hes to begine when the Towne shall appoint him and to haue Twenty pounds the one halfe paid him In Monny when he hath kept halfe his tyme and the other halfe In Come when he hath done keeping at the price wch the Comon Rate of Come goeth when he is to be paid and he is to have a man to help him the first 14 days he payinge him for one weeke the Towne for the other alsoe he is to lodg ther exsept once a weeke and to haue a man to keepe them everj other Sct both day and hee to paye Xs a beast/or every beast he shall loese and to keepe noe Cattell of anny man exsept the Townsmen give leaue vpon the for/etuer of 5s a head for every head he shall soe keepe.

In 1638 there appears the following record: Agreed Wth William Patten to keep three score cowes more or lesse vnder 4 score att the direction a/the Townsmen/or all this sumr vntill they take them in att lOs a weeke the one hal/e to bepd in the first weeke in July eithr in monie or good come & thothr halfe when he leaveth a/keeping them in monie & those that Refuse to paye in monie shall paye in come att the price that it is att when it is merchantable he is to pay 3d/or eur cowe he lea veth out a night & Xs a cowe for eurie one that is lost through his Defaulte he is to take noe oth cattell without the townsmens consent he is to dryve them out by six a/the clock in the morning & bring them home by sunn hal/e an houre high att night at the latest & to bring them into the towne eure Evening he is to keepe them but eurie third Sabt & thoth to be prvided for as in former tyme & whoe eur shall bring in anie strange cattell shall synde a helpe for 2 or 3 dayes & the owners to bring them into the common eure morning by the tyme appoynted & his owne cow to be kept free as long as he keepeth them & he is to pay 6d damage for eurie morning that he is not gone out by the tyme appoynted.

In 1646 we find that Brother Patten was fined thrice one shilling for one hog without keeper. On the twentieth day of the third month in 1649, we find that Andrew Stevenson and William Patten were appointed to execute the town order concerning hogs, and to levy on all such as shall be found breaking that order the just penalty of the same therein prescribed. In the same year liberty was granted some of the townsmen, among them William Patten, for the present hay time to mow the common meadow at Shawshine, "prvided they intrench uppon noe prpriety."

On two or three different occasions we find him appointed as one of the surveyors of fences, his district being that about the Menotomy Fields. He was also appointed surveyor of highways on one or two occasions.

The Common, as it was called, was well-timbered, for we find that when anyone wished for lumber he went to the selectmen for permission to get it from the Common. In 1660, at a meeting of the selectmen, several people, among them William Patten, were granted liberty to take timber to repair their fences and for "reparaccon of their houses. In 1663 he was granted liberty to take timber from the Common for a cart, and at another time for a cow-house and half a hundred "rayles7 In November, 1665, he was granted liberty to fell timber to build a lean-to and an end to his barn, and in 1668 to "repayre his old house at towne." He did not always ask for permission, for in 1662 we find that he was fined twenty shillings for felling trees on the Common contrary to town orders. Fines levied by the selectmen were sometimes abated, for in 1663 we find that a fine imposed upon William Patten was abated five shillings. In 1642 we find William Patten enrolled as a member of the honorable Artillery Company of Boston.

William Patten lived on what is now Massachusetts Avenue, opposite the Common. We find in the proprietors  records that William Patten had: One house and garden. about halfe an Acre upon the Cow Common, John Means East, Cow Common South, Thomas Blogget west pine swampe North. In the new Lotts next Manotomie two Acres of planteing grounde Persivall Greene East, Willam Manning west Richard Champnies South, Gregory Stone North. In 1645, forty-seven lots on the west side of Menotomy River were granted to the several inhabitants of the town. In this distribution William Patten had "three acr more or lesse, Richard Francis East Daniell Kempster West, Charlestowne lyne north Comon south." A reference to the accompanying plan will give an idea of the location of his place. In 1901 the city of Cambridge published its early town records and with them a plan of the place in 1635 which had been compiled from the best sources obtainable. By the courtesy of the city clerk we are able to reproduce that plan here.

An agreement was made by the church 9 June, 1652, as to the division of Shawshine. In this William Patten was assigned lot 87, containing ninety acres. Although by the generosity of the church all the inhabitants received allotments of the Shawshine lands, comparatively few established a residence there. Although the name William Patten appears often in the matters of land distribution in the settlement of Billerica, it is doubtful if he ever took up his residence there, but remained in Cambridge until his death. As early as 1655, there were so many householders there that they were incorporated as a distinct town named Billerica. The town records, 29 January, 1654155, show that in answer to a letter sent them by their neighbors of Shawshine, alias Billerica, wherein they desire that the whole tract may be disengaged from this place and be one entire body by itself, a committee of five was appointed, who drew up an agreement for a separation, and this was consented to by William Patten and others present, the inhabitants of Shawshme. This agreement, or "Great Deed," as it is called, has been carefully preserved by the town ofBillerica, and bound between two covers which bear the title, "The Great Deed from the Cambridge Proprietors to the Billerica Proprietors, 1654." The body of the deed reads as follows:

To ALL PEOPLE to whome these prsents shall come Greeting KNOW YE that wee whose names are Subscribed FOR Sundry good consideracions us the reunto moving and for valluable consideracions to us respectively paid well & truly the recite whereof wee do by these prsents respectively acknowledge and therewth to be fully sattesfied & payd and thereof and of every part & parcell the reof do fully clearely and absolutely acquitt exonerate & discharge the Inhabitants of Billerica their heyres successors Ex ors administratoLtrs and Assignees forever by their prsent have given granted bargained sold aliened enfeoffed and con firmd unto & by these prsents do fully clearly and absolutely give grant bargain & sell alien enfeofe & con firme unto the Inhabitants of Billerica aforesaid their heyres assignes & such others as shall from time to time be by them admitted as free denizens of the said place & to the enjoyment of the priviledges thereof all our respective rights & interest therein unto any part of parcell of the said land now called by the said name of Billerica als Shawshine with all the.priviledges & appurtenances to the same appert eyning or in any wise belonging (only excepting & reserving our Joynt & respective interest that any of us have in the farme wherein John Parker now dwelleth comonly called by the name of the Churches farme (i.e.) the church at Cambridge with free liberty on all the comons of the said place for the Inhabitants on the said farme from time to time for the herbage timber & firewood as any other of the Inhabitants and a joint interest therein together with ye said towne & inhabitants thereof)
TO HAVE AND TO HOLD the said bargained prmises with all the priviledges & appurtenances (except before excepted) unto them the said Inhabitants their heyres assigns & successours for ever to their & their only propper use & behooffe. AND we whose names are subscri bed for us our heyres exorrs & administrators do respectively covenant promise grant to and with the Inhabitants of the said place their heyres assignes & law full associates & successors that they the said Inhabitants their heyres assignes successours & law full associates shall or may at all times & from time to time for ever hereafter lawfully & peaceably have hold occupy possess & Injoy the said bargaines & assigned prmises & every part & parcell the re of with all and singular priviledges & appurtenances thereof without the law full claims let hindrance contradiccon or denial of us or any of us whose names are subscribed our heyres executors administrators or assignes or any of them or of any other person or persons whatsoever claiming by from or under us or any of us provided always this instrument is to be understood of every mans engagement to be only for & in the behealfe of himself his owne heires executors & adm strators &c and no further or other. IN WITNESS whereof we have put our hands & seales this 25th day of March Anno Dom 1654.

This is the foundation upon which the town of Billerica was started, and to this document the name of William Patten with others was signed. We here reproduce the document, so that his descendants may see his name as he wrote it. The name may be seen in the fifth column, about halfway down.

He married before coming to this country a woman named Mary, who died 20 September, 1673.

William Patten died 10 December, 1668. He left no will, but on 2 April, 1669, his wife filed with the court the following inventory of his property:

His wearing Apparell:
1 Gray Coate
1 Strayte bodyed Coate
I Shagg d Coate 13s
2 pr Breeches
old cloaks, Jackett, & wescote
S/woes & stockins
Shirts, bands, cuffs & handkerchiefs
2 hatts

In ye Hall:
2 Tables & a forme
5 old chayres
1 cubbard & cubbard cloath
1 small chest
1 Tub & old payle
2 Sives, great bowle, trenchers, ladle
earthen ware
Iron Pott & kettle
Pewter, & a brass candlesticke
brass ware
A spitt
A smoothing Iron
And Iron, fire shovell, tongs, liakes, gridiron,
bellows, sheers, peel
Stone Jug
Hand Saw, Trowell, Scales, weights,
2 axes, beetle rings
4 old cushins
4 pr sheets
2 Table cloaths & 4 napkins
4 Pillow beers
1 file

In ye Parlor, Parlor charnb. Hall chamb. & cellar:
1 chest
1 old warmeing Pan
1 old wheele for spinning
1 old Tub
1 old trundle bedstead, thin flocke bed,
pillows, blanket
1 beame knife, with &Paring Knife
1 bedstead & furniture
2 spinning wheels
Sword & muskett
4 bush 1/2 barley
15 bush. Ry
1 halfe bush
1 Croscutt Saw
2 ft wood
3 bush pease
in cheese
Pillion & old coverled
Old Iron & Sithes
Porke
Coopers ware & 2 glass bottles
Sope

In ye yard & barnes:
Swine
5 Cowes
1payre oxen
21 yearlings
22 yearlings
1 old mare
1 horse
1 sucking calfe
cart rope & horse harness
1fann
forkes, rakes, flailes
Iron frow
Old Butt
25 bush Indian
1 old sacke
1 dung forke shovell & spade
4 sheep & a lamb
Plough, cart, yoakes, chaynes, cart ladders,
old hoops and boxes
old hows & grindstone & mattocks
House, barne, & 10 acres of land, where of 75
5 acres is sowne with Ry
4 acres plow land in west field
3 acres of swamp land
Iron wedges
House & yard at Towne

Mary 1 was born 2 in 1609 in Hardington, Mandeville, Somerset, England, United Kingdom. She died 3 on 20 Sep 1673 in Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. Mary married 4 William PATTEN in BY 1632 in England, United Kingdom.

They had the following children.

  F i Mary PATTEN was born in BET 1632 AND 1634. She died in 1674.
  M ii Thomas PATTEN was born in Oct 1636. He died on 16 Jan 1690.
  F iii
Sarah PATTEN was born 1 on 27 Jan 1638 in Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

BIRTH: year given as 16___
  M iv
Nathaniel PATTEN was born in 1639 in Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. He died 1 in Jan 1639/1640 in Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.
  M v
William PATTEN was born about 1641 in Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. He died on 22 Mar 1645. He was buried 1 on 22 Mar 1645/1646 in Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.
  F vi
Sarah PATTEN was born 1 on 27 Nov 1641 in Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

BIRTH: Year given as 16___
  M vii Nathaniel PATTEN was born on 28 Jul 1643. He died on 12 Jun 1725.
  F viii Sarah PATTEN was born on 26 Jan 1645. She died on 24 Sep 1677.

Thomas PATTEN [Parents] [scrapbook] was born 1, 2 in Oct 1636 in Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. He died 3, 4 on 16 Jan 1690 in Billerica, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. Thomas married 5, 6 Sarah KENDALL on 20 May 1686 in Billerica, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

Other marriages:
PAINE, Rebecca

Sarah KENDALL. Sarah married 1, 2 Thomas PATTEN on 20 May 1686 in Billerica, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

Surname may be Dunton

They had the following children.

  F i
Mehetabel PATTEN was born 1 on 28 Feb 1687 in Billerica, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.
  M ii
Kendall PATTEN was born 1 on 20 Apr 1689 in Billerica, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

Thomas PAINE 1 was born in 1616 in of Norfolk, Massachusetts, United States. Thomas married 2 Rebecca WARE on 17 Oct 1640 in Dedham, Norfolk, Massachusetts, United States.

Thomas's will was probated 3 on 23 Sep 1686 in Dedham, Norfolk, Massachusetts, United States.

Rebecca WARE was born in 1620 in of Norfolk, Massachusetts, United States. Rebecca married 1 Thomas PAINE on 17 Oct 1640 in Dedham, Norfolk, Massachusetts, United States.


From Maybeth's chart

They had the following children.

  F i Rebecca PAINE was born on 19 Oct 1642. She died on 19 May 1684.

Thomas PATTEN [Parents] was born 1, 2 on 22 Mar 1665 in Billerica, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. He died 3 on 10 Oct 1747. Thomas married Miriam STEARNS.

Miriam STEARNS. Miriam married Thomas PATTEN.

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